French welcome for tourists

Jul 10th, 2012, 11:36 AM
  #41  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 777
Pal: Okay, I see what you mean.

In some ways, it's similar to Mexico, where I think tourism has changed the culture.

Having visited Playa del Carmen years ago when it was a sleepy fishing village, and then as time has gone by and many cruise ships have come and gone, there seems to me to be a fundamental shift in values, more Americanized, you might say.

And it really irks me to see tourists treating the Mexican people like peasants/slaves from time to time.

But then, values in society in general have changed, and I guess one could also argue the pros and cons of tourism.
sundriedpachino is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 11:55 AM
  #42  
 
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I suppose that you object to that too, Pal!>

No I do not and I note that one character from Coronation Street moved to Brittany I believe and opened a bakery, of all things.

And yes it does save these villages - note that many French also buy second houses in such villages - and I think the French village is about as nice towns - looking that is - as anywhere in Europe - no wonder so many want to live in those dreamy places where life is slower and safe.

So no I am not against it - just the attitude I read about in books and hear on TV shows comes across as kind of haughty - superior attitude to dumb locals.
PalenQ is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 11:57 AM
  #43  
 
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Actually it's ironic that the French and English get along so well, like in the Brittany village.

All my French friends and in-laws constantly mock the British as being nerdish - over and over - laughing at their 'quaint' ways so it is ironic they get along so well.

Money talks.
PalenQ is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 11:59 AM
  #44  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
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My DH and I spent three weeks in France last summer in France, Provence and the Riviera. We interacted with many wonderful French people, and with the exception of two men (who I think were somewhat mentally imbalanced), everyone was very kind to us.

I agree that taking the time to greet people when you enter their establishment goes a long way, as do all the other small polite gestures. Most people were also very accepting of my attempts to use my schoolroom French.

The French, like everyone else, appreciate being treated respectfully. They are not overly familiar but they are friendly when you attempt to do things according to what's expected.
cybertraveler is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 12:19 PM
  #45  
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
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Ha! I don't think the French would put up with being treated by the British as dumb locals for one minute! I suppose British humour can come across as sarcastic sometimes.
MaisiePlague is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 12:22 PM
  #46  
 
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I don't think the French would put up with being treated by the British as dumb locals for one minute!3

No, they'd rather treat the British as dumb foreigners.
Pvoyageuse is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 12:43 PM
  #47  
 
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All my French friends and in-laws constantly mock the British as being nerdish - over and over - laughing at their 'quaint' ways so it is ironic they get along so well.>>

mmm - who is exploiting whom, i wonder?
annhig is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 12:45 PM
  #48  
 
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Just got back from two weeks in France and everyone that we encountered was wonderful. I am not very fluent in French, but I did know enough to greet everyone and at least try some of their language. Wonderful country, wonderful food and great wine!
kraines is offline  
Jul 11th, 2012, 09:33 AM
  #49  
 
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I've been to France a few times, to Paris and elsewhere. I agree with the comments that big-city people (Parisians) will be cooler than people elsewhere. One thing that I've noticed is that if you know the customs, it avoids situations where you think that they are rude. For example, any restaurant with outside tables which are set with glasses and silverware reserves them for people who eat: you can't just drink a glass there. For the French, this is self-evident and they think YOU are rude for blocking their best tables, and will ask you to move. First, learn the local customs, then you'll be able to swim with the flow.
RunningTheWorld is offline  
Jul 11th, 2012, 09:46 AM
  #50  
 
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annhig - I should add that I do not share the mocking feelings for Brits that it seems most of the French folks I know have. I constantly upbraid them for their misconceptions about Brits.
PalenQ is offline  
Jul 11th, 2012, 11:05 AM
  #51  
 
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I should add that I do not share the mocking feelings for Brits that it seems most of the French folks I know have. I constantly upbraid them for their misconceptions about Brits.>>

phew, Pal, that's a relief.
annhig is offline  
Jul 12th, 2012, 01:21 AM
  #52  
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
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Don't worry PalenQ, plenty of Brits love taking the piss out of the French too!
MaisiePlague is offline  
Jul 12th, 2012, 08:00 AM
  #53  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
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i know that you are an afficionado of Corrie, but have you ever seen 'Allo 'Allo?

i'm sure you'd appreciate its humour.
annhig is offline  

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