Foodies: Parmegiano Reggiano

Apr 17th, 2003, 07:57 AM
  #41  
 
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when you say 40 bucks for a bottle, where are you buying it from? i'm assuming that's the price in the states? hopefully it would be a little less in italy?

the recipe sounds delicious.
Jackie_in_Italy is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 07:58 AM
  #42  
 
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You can identify the true stuff because it is produced by two consortiuns, one in modena and one, less famous, in Reggio Emilia. Only the bottles that bear the consontiums' marks hold true balsamic vinegar. As for the size of the bottles, remember that balsamic vinegar is not meant to be used as common vinegar. You actually use but a few drops of it to flavor some foods, such as aged cheeses (Parmigiano Reggiano stravecchio, over two years of aging), wild strawberries and plain bread. One drop is enough to flavor a small chunk of bread! Check out www.acetaiasangiacomo.com.
Alice_Twain is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 08:04 AM
  #43  
 
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Alice,
your knowledge about the stuff is helpful. Thanks for the website . I've always been curious about the stuff, and being over here in Italy, I think it's the perfect time to try some of the real vinegar. This might call for a visit to Modena (or Reggio Emilia, not sure yet!)!
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Apr 17th, 2003, 09:21 AM
  #44  
mm
 
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As Mario says Parmegiano Reggiano is "The Undisputed King of Cheeses".

maitaitom: I love the way toasted Parmegiano Reggiano tastes. Fantastic.

MM
mm is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 11:19 AM
  #45  
 
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The person who wrote that parmigiano reggiano can be kept in the freezer is giving bum advice. I have tried freezing parmigiano reggiano and have found that it crumbles and loses its flavor. However, it will keep for quite a while in the fridge. Some advise wrapping it in waxed paper.
cirpi is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 11:34 AM
  #46  
 
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"maitaitom: I love the way toasted Parmegiano Reggiano tastes. Fantastic."

When we place the grated cheese on the Silipat, we also put a little basil or rosemary with it. They're a great party appetizer. We made a batch last night.
maitaitom is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 11:46 AM
  #47  
 
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The best way to preserve a wedge of Parmigiano Reggiano, in my experience, is to roll it in a white cotton or linen cloth, than in a plastic bag and finally place it in the less cool part of the fridge. This works well enough, in particular if you take it out every day or ttwo for a few minutes (usually the time needed to grate some of it or to cut a few pieces for eating).
Alice_Twain is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 11:52 AM
  #48  
ira
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Hi SugarPlum,

I'm about 90 miles out of Augusta.

I did get to Athens, GA (home of UGa) and found some PR cheese.

It is much, much better than the stuff I bought that started this thread.

What about olive oil? Are there really major differences between brands?
ira is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 11:54 AM
  #49  
 
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We can buy buffalo mozzarella in the supermarkets here.

The BEST Italian cheese is none of the above but provolone piccante. Brilliant stuff.

However I intervened in this thread simply to tell you about 2 books. One is called "Dear Francesca" and is written by a third generation tally Scot called Mary Contini, whose family owns the best Italian deli in Scotland if not Britain- Valvona and Crolla.

It's partly an instruction book for her daughter about how to keep an Italian kitchen, partly a history book about how her grandparents came to Scotland from Italy just after the 1st war, and established their business here (and is very moving) and it's partly a cook book.

The second book is a novel called "Blessed are the Cheesemakers" set in Ireland and written by Sarah-Kate Lynch. It's a lovely surreal book that all cheeselovers will love.
sheila is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 11:57 AM
  #50  
 
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My grandfather wrapped his in cheesecloth but no plastic. No cheese should be left out of the refrigerator or it will sry. When you buy any cheese at the market that is wrapped examine the edges. If they are yellowed it is too old and dry. Here is Cambridge we are lucky to have a great cheese shop and the owner has his own cellar for the affinage.(one of the few in the states)
cigalechanta is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 12:09 PM
  #51  
 
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We're fortunate to have a great Italian market a few miles from our house, so we're never with out our parmegian or San Marzano tomatoes...anyway, when you finish your wdge of cheese, put the rind in a ziplock and throw it in the freezer to use later to flavor soups. It works great. The rind gets soft but doesn't actually fall apart in the soup. I use it especially when I make home-made minestrone..it makes a huge difference in the flavor.
sandi_travelnut is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 12:09 PM
  #52  
 
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cigalechanta: All cheese must be kept in the fridge, usually under a plastic "bell" that protects it from drying off. I do not know exactly the English cheese, but you probably miss the concept of a cheese so smelly and soft that it _actually_ chases after you if you just forget it outside the fridge for more than a few minutes. With chases after you I mean that it starts melting out of the dish you placed it in and slowly makes its way to the floor, while its smell starts impregnating the whole house, ingluding the bed sheets behind two closed doors. I would not dare leave some cheeses from Piedmont out of my fridge, not without muzzle and leash!
Alice_Twain is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 12:09 PM
  #53  
 
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We're fortunate to have a great Italian market a few miles from our house, so we're never with out our parmegian or San Marzano tomatoes...anyway, when you finish your wedge of cheese, put the rind in a ziplock and throw it in the freezer to use later to flavor soups. It works great. The rind gets soft but doesn't actually fall apart in the soup. I use it especially when I make home-made minestrone..it makes a huge difference in the flavor.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 12:16 PM
  #54  
 
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LOL ! Alice, there have been cheeses like that in my house and you are so right!! They do follow you out the door and all over the house! My husband loves them! I whine about them but sometimes even I like them
Then there are the Goat cheeses that my husband says " The Goatier the better"!!
Scarlett is offline  
Apr 17th, 2003, 12:17 PM
  #55  
ira
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Hi Alice,

If the cheese that chases you has blue veins in it, it is probably a well-aged Stilton.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 01:10 PM
  #56  
 
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So, Miss Scarlett, you're saying that you provide the "whine" to go with your husband's cheese?

Sorry, couldn't help myself.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 01:20 PM
  #57  
 
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that was cheezy of you! Sorry I couldn't help it. The smell of that cheese got to me.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 02:55 PM
  #58  
 
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Sheila: Where is "here"? Unless you're in Southern Ca, I'm hoping for a website or ctc # for Mozzarella di Bufala. Anyone?? Thanks. johnchas.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 04:02 PM
  #59  
jmw
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Hello, Ira et al. Would I be a peasant to say my favorite at the moment is Asiago? Slivered on bresaola w/ green onions and olive oil, which brings me to the new topic Ira tried to weave into this discussion a couple of posts back: olive oil. Favorites anyone? Presently I choose mine by the aesthetic qualities of the bottle, so I'm open to suggestions w/o sarcasm. J.
 
Apr 17th, 2003, 04:34 PM
  #60  
 
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mimi, heather,
Lol, yes, I can always supply the whine

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