Foodies: Parmegiano Reggiano

Apr 16th, 2003, 01:34 PM
  #21  
ira
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Thanks a lot to all of you folks for your helpful info.
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Apr 16th, 2003, 01:43 PM
  #22  
 
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"Message: I beg to differ, no real cook would have that crap in a cardboard tube in their kitchen. Of course, if you like sawdust...to each his own."

Thanks, Emeril. I have it grated by a nice Italian lady who gave us the recipe. They're pretty darn good and many people have asked for the recipe, but then again, I'm not a "real" chef. I guess here in California we have "road rage" while back in Charlotte you have "food rage."
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Apr 16th, 2003, 01:52 PM
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Bruteforce, as Shanna said, this isn't Kraft in the green tube. So before you jump down people's throats as "THE Gourmand of the Travel Board", perhaps you could pick up some helpful hints.
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Apr 16th, 2003, 02:45 PM
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I love parmesan, rocket (arugula) and balsamic vinegar salads... Mmmmm!
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Apr 16th, 2003, 02:53 PM
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"Message: I love parmesan, rocket (arugula) and balsamic vinegar salads... Mmmmm!"

Sometime try substituting the parmesan with some shaved pecorino and add fresh tomatoes. Of course, I love just about anything with balsamic.
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Apr 16th, 2003, 03:01 PM
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Not so keen on fresh tomato in salads though the exception is really sweet, full flavoured tomatoes with good fresh buffalo mozarella...

I sometimes make the balsamic into a dressing but usually just use it as it is.

I like pecorino too...

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Apr 16th, 2003, 03:19 PM
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"full flavoured tomatoes"

It is amazing how much more tasteful a tomato (or melon) tastes in Italy. I have pretty good luck with hothouse tomatoes for taste, but nothing like Italy.
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Apr 16th, 2003, 04:01 PM
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The tomatoes in England are often small little perfectly round and delicious! While here we eat big fat red Jersey Tomatoes!
Nothing like a fresh tomato eaten like an apple
except I guess with some Parm cheese with it~
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Apr 16th, 2003, 04:27 PM
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you say tomatoe, I sat tomato, let's call the whole thing off, except of course for the Parm.Regg. which has a sweet, nutty taste with a slightly grainy texture that melts in the mouth. Expensive but worth every penny. From the first of April through the November, the Parma cows eat fresh grass to produce the milk to make this cheese. Mouth size Pieces broken off served with ripe pears and thin slices served with raw artichoke bottoms laces with a superb extra virgin olive oil
Bon appetit!
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Apr 16th, 2003, 04:31 PM
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mimi, spoken like a true blue foodie~
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Apr 16th, 2003, 04:41 PM
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cigalechanta said, "you say tomatoe"

Aha. I wondered where Dan Quayle was hiding. Your artichoke/pear combo sounds great. Perhaps a Fodorite cookbook is in order.
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Apr 16th, 2003, 05:51 PM
  #32  
ira
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Hi all,
I'm honored to have started a foodie thread.

I love salada caprese. I also have a great affection for Pecorino Romano.

Why is Parmigiano Reggiano the "best" of all Italian cheeses?
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Apr 16th, 2003, 07:12 PM
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"I also have a great affection for Pecorino Romano. Why is Parmigiano Reggiano the "best" of all Italian cheeses?"

It's not. After our visit to Pienza, Pecorino is the cheese of choice for me (and everyone else on our trip).
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Apr 16th, 2003, 10:57 PM
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Where in the US can we order authentic Italian Mozzarella di Buffala (website, catalogue, 800#)??
This thread is making my taste buds crazy. johnchas.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 05:28 AM
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Even having a chink of the real stuff grated before your eyes does not save you from the grated cardbord effect. Grated Parmigiano Reggiano must be used withing 24 hours if kept outside the fridge or 48 hours if kept into the fridge, or it loses too much wetness and therefore flavor. This is why all the Itlaian families have their own "grattugia" and grating the cheese for serving on pasta is a daily chore. If you can't use a traditional "grattugia" you can use an electric grater. The best ones are the handheld ones that are fed little pieces of cheese and with wich you can grate your own cheese on your hot pasta. Yet no electric grater will produce the same texture in the grated cheese.
The reason for which Parmigiano Reggiano is though of as the king of Italian cheeses is not only due to its taste but also to its versatility. Parmiagiano is the most renown of the "grana" cheeses (that include also Grana Padano. Grana Lodigiano, Vernengo, Grana Trentino etc.) due to the superior standards under which it is produced (only from raw milk produced from cows fed of fresh grass growing in a very limited area of Emilia Romagna, and which temperature during the production of the cheese cannot exceed a certain temperature, less than 50ºC, but I can't remember it exactly now). This way Parmigiano Reggiano is usually aged for 18,24,30 or 36 months, but very limited and exclusive productions can be aged up to 8 years, while the other varieties of Grana cheese are usually age 12-18 months. Grana is used not only to garnish pasta, it is present in the recipes of a variety of Italian dishes, including every kind of risotto, lots of meat recipes, lasagne of every kind, ravioli, tortelli, anolini, cappelletti and so on.
After writing all this, you may think that I am a big consumer of it. you are wrong: I am allergic to uncooked Grana cheeses!
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Apr 17th, 2003, 06:32 AM
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Ira, I don't know how rural you are in Georgia -- of course everything that isn't Atlanta is usually considered rural Georgia. I live in semi-rural Augusta. Parmegiano Reggiano is available here at the Fresh Market, and I have even found Pecorino there.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 07:18 AM
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I am not sure how easy it is to find in the states, or if you are buying the real thing or not. i think it is funny though how many things get the name Parmigiano, without having any of the authenticity. My dad buys good fake Parmigiano that says clearly on it "Made in Wisconsin." Makes me laugh, but it's still not bad stuff.

I brought home real Parmigiano for Christmas, and it was really really different for my parents than the stuff they have had at home. Then, I gave them another block that I bought here (italy) that they liked even more, and since I got it sliced fresh at a cheese shop i think it made a big difference. there is a difference in quality, i think, even among the authentic stuff.

question: has anyone had any real honest-to-goodness true blue modena balsamic vinegar?
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Apr 17th, 2003, 07:31 AM
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Yes, and like the cheese the authentic is like night and day when compared to the cheap fake stuff and it is VERY VERY expensive, a tiny bottle about the size of a perfume bottle is over 40 dollars. Like truffles, too expensive for even special occassions.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 07:35 AM
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but how can you tell when the balsamic vinegar is authentic? i guess the cost is the only way? because it seems like they call everything authentic, even over here in italy. i know that they sell balsamic in wineries instead, but even there, i have a hard time knowing if it is REAL balsamic.

40 bucks for a perfume sized bottle? wow.
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Apr 17th, 2003, 07:53 AM
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actually, it's alot more today. It must say on the bottle, and no straying from this wording:
Aceto balsamiico traditional modena or reggioemilia(the two places where it always came from. I use recipes from a site. The real thing over pears and a dollop of fresh ricotta,
over mesclun salad with shallots, extra virgin olive oil, criped pancetta, toasted walnuts and top with shards of aged parmesan.
The authentic Balsamic are in certain shaped bottles and special sealing by restrictions.
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