following special diet in Paris

May 23rd, 2001, 01:59 AM
  #1  
Teresa
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following special diet in Paris

I follow a controlled-carbohydrate eating plan to control my insulin levels. Basically, I eat carb-rich food at only one meal per day. A typical lo-carb meal for me is a green salad or steamed veggies with grilled/roasted chicken or beef, a chicken caesar salad (without croutons) or something along those lines. I'd appreciate any ideas on where to go for meals such as these in Paris. (When I travel to the US it's so easy to follow my plan, as most restaurants have various salads.)

BTW, I can have my carb-rich meal at either lunch or dinner, if that makes a difference. At that meal I have no restrictions as to what I eat.

Breakfast is cheese or sometimes an omelet plus black coffee (because I hate milk!). So as you can see, cafe au lait and croissants are out! Ideas for breakfast are welcome also.

Thanks!
 
May 23rd, 2001, 03:06 AM
  #2  
Ross
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Hi Teresa!!!

There is a restaurant chain throughout France called <<HIPPOPOTAMUS>>, which has several locations in Paris. They are similar to the TGIF Friday's restaurants found in the US, only cleaner and the food is better. Don't expect to eat the MOST extravagant meal here, though you can get grilled chicken with unlimidted steamed string beans, baked-potato, and rice, at all times. There is a location that I frequent every time I go to Paris that is located near the Bastille metro stop. They have menus posted outside in several languages, including English. The prices are QUITE reasonable, especially for a full meal in Paris. You can check out their menu in French on the web at www.hippopotamus.fr

Feel free to E-Mail me if you have any questions. I eat there because of the types of foods that I eat as well, though not due to insulin control.

Enjoy Paris!!!

It's LOVELY!!!

Ross.
 
May 23rd, 2001, 04:40 AM
  #3  
elaine
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Teresa
I can't think of any cafe or restaurant in Paris where I haven't been able to
have a salad nicoise (greens, tuna, olives) or an omelette, or for lunch, as just two examples. When you order the salad ask for it
"sans carottes et sans pommes de terre)
(sahn car ROT ay sahn pum de tare)
because I noticed a tendency to add potatoes sometimes and shredded carrots often. YOu will also see plain grilled or sauteed fish on many menus.
Breakfast is more problematic. Some hotels offer a breakfast buffet that includes cold meats and eggs made to order, at an often high price (around
$15-$20 US). Still, if you look at it as lunch, and just have a salad at lunchtime, it may not be unaffordable for you.
It will take all your willpower to resist the gorgeous-looking breads and rolls and croissants that surround you at breakfast
Carbohydrate Addicts' Diet by any chance? If you'd like to discuss it further, feel free to email me.
 
May 23rd, 2001, 05:35 AM
  #4  
Gretchen
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For breakfast you could go to a cafe for your coffee after stopping by a market for a hunk of cheese. Also some cafes serve an "American breakfast"--eggs, coffee and bread. All the rest sounds very available at any or many restaurants or brasseries.
 
May 23rd, 2001, 06:23 AM
  #5  
Kathy
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Hi Teresa,
I think you should really not have a problem. If you are going out to dinner, you will probably need to make a reservation anyway. If you stay in a hotel, making the reservation is one of the services they'll provide & can communicate to the restaurant any dietary restrictions you may have at that time. I think the general menu offerings, however, should allow you to follow your diet with one or two small modifications.
Bon Voyage!
Kathy
 
May 23rd, 2001, 08:19 AM
  #6  
elvira
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Boucheries often have whole roasted chickens (the spit roaster is usually on the sidewalk or walkup window) for sale. There are lots of Chinese and other Asian restaurants throughout the city. Omelets are lunch food. You can get gyro sandwiches (skip the ones served in the Latin Quarter just due east of Blvd St Michel; look for the shops in other neighborhoods) which are packed with meat and veggies - just don't eat the pita pocket. Cafes, bistros and most restaurants have a variety of salads; even if they're only side orders, you can get several to make up a meal (interesting veggies, like celery root...). Lots of meals are served with frites (French fries); tell the server that you don't want the frites - sometimes s/he will ask if you'd like something else instead. If s/he doesn't, you can ask. Don't get uppity if s/he says no; this isn't the U.S. and the customer isn't always right; ask for a side salad and be willing to pay extra for it; sometimes, surprisingly, there's a "discount" of some sort on prices when you get the bill...leave the server a little extra on the table...; there are traiteurs (delis) in every neighborhood with salads, cold and hot meats, cheeses, etc. and most will make up a plate to go (if not, just buy little bits of what you want and make up your own meal).
 
May 23rd, 2001, 11:47 AM
  #7  
Abby
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This is interesting. Is it as easy to follow such a diet in Italy; specifically Rome, Venice and Florence? Do they have equivalents of the boucheries in Paris where you can get simply roasted chickens, and are vegetables available without too much oil? Also what about skim milk? Is that available anywhere in Europe?
 
May 23rd, 2001, 12:26 PM
  #8  
Christina
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I agree that you shouldn't have any problem ordering what you want in a typical Parisian cafe or bistro--just order a protein dish (meat, chicken or fish), salad or vegetable. Cafes especially often have a variety of salads, in particular one with greens, walnuts, and goat cheese (chevre) is one of my favorites and would fit your diet, I guess. Just don't order or eat the bread, potatoes, etc. Omelettes are common on cafe menus, so you could get that for breakfast. Just thought I'd suggest some well-known restaurants which have entire meals of degustations or cheese tastings where you get a variety of cheeses (although I can't quite imagine eating that without some kind of bread myself, they will probably serve bread with it). Try Les Miss at 4, rue des Fosses-Sainte-Jacques near Luxembourg metro for salads and a cheese-based menu or the restaurant attached to the fromagerie La Ferme Saint-Hubert in rue Vignon in the 8th arr near Madeleine metro; they have a 7-variety cheese menu and degustations and also salads.
 
May 23rd, 2001, 12:30 PM
  #9  
Christina
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BTW, skim milk is certainly available in France, but I have not looked for milk much in other countries so cannot say for sure, but I would guess it is. I think in Italian it is latte scremato.
 
May 23rd, 2001, 12:37 PM
  #10  
Ess
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I was on the Atkins diet (low-carb) before I left for Paris. It worked pretty well for me, lost 11 lbs. Once I got to Paris all bets were off. It was certainly possible to avoid carbs, but who would want to? I thoroughly enjoyed all the croissants and pastry and street crepes and bread. And when I got back home I had lost another 2 lbs from all the walking. Anway, I never got back on that diet. Paris did me in. Teresa, I hope you have a lot of will power!
 
May 23rd, 2001, 03:27 PM
  #11  
Teresa
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Wow! Thanks for all the wonderful suggestions. I was really concerned, but I see I don't have to be.

In my country the customer isn't always right either (LOL) so I'm used to asking for substitutions politely and even begging if need be

Since I do get to eat carbs once a day, I think I can deal with postponing gratification till that one meal. That's the beauty of this plan, and yes, it is the Carb Addict's Lifespan Program... I lost 62 lbs and have kept them off for a year, so I'm not planning to undo all this hard work, even for croissants! But I digress...

Thanks again for all the ideas.

Teresa
 
May 23rd, 2001, 03:40 PM
  #12  
Donna
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You might want to bring a really comprehensive French food glossary along. The most comprehensive one I've found is "French Cuisine, The Gourmet's Companion" by Jeffrey A. Sadowski. With most other glossaries, frustration sets in when only every fifth or sixth word on a menu is included. But, this one is a winner.
 
May 24th, 2001, 04:58 AM
  #13  
elaine
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Teresa
Congratulations on your accomplishment.
I've been on the CA eating plan for almost 10 years myself, and never plan to go off it. The only difficulty is that it doesn't mesh with most people's idea of dieting (especially when they see me at my 'reward meal') and well-meaning people are always suggesting low-calorie alternatives for breakfast or lunch like
yogurt and fruit that don't go with this plan.
Good luck
 

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