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Fodorís, Steveís, Degas, Steinbicker, Frommerís, Eyewitness, just who does have the best walking tours of Paris?

Fodorís, Steveís, Degas, Steinbicker, Frommerís, Eyewitness, just who does have the best walking tours of Paris?

Mar 17th, 2006, 10:23 AM
  #1  
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Fodorís, Steveís, Degas, Steinbicker, Frommerís, Eyewitness, just who does have the best walking tours of Paris?

I am traveling to Paris for 9 days in May. I have researched the different museums and sites with the many guides that I have purchased or borrowed from our library. I donít plan to walk around Paris with my nose in a guide book, afraid to venture off on my own. But, I would appreciate guided, mapped, walks of the different quarters so that I can see the more interesting parts of Paris. I have looked at several threads here and Rick Steveís and Eyewitness have limited maps with walking tours. Degas gives narrative tours but they are hard for me to follow on a map. Any suggestions?
SurfSide6 is offline  
Mar 17th, 2006, 10:45 AM
  #2  
ira
 
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Hi SS,

You left out Michelin.

If you sit down with Degas's walks and a map (see www.viamichelin.com or www.mappy.com) you will find them rather easy to follow.

ira is offline  
Mar 17th, 2006, 01:08 PM
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I love to walk, but I don't follow walking tours. I get a good map, do some planning, and pick an area. I create my own tour based on what I want to see in that area. Before I leave my hotel, or over my breakfast, I go over my plan for the day and keep the map with me. That said: I seem to always find some corner to investigate that I hadn't planned on.
cchottel is offline  
Mar 17th, 2006, 01:12 PM
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Chronicle books puts out a boxed set of cards, "City Walks: Paris"
50 adventures on foot. You can take one or two cards with you for the areas you would like to walk through.
cigalechanta is offline  
Mar 17th, 2006, 01:17 PM
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There are some other guidebooks that specialize in walking tours of Paris, you might look at them. I look at them and get a feel for what they cover, maps, etc.

I would never follow Rick Steves because I don't like his taste, and detest his maps. I read one of his once, and I thought it was just silly (rue Cler), as all it did was point out the names of shops (this is a cheese shop, over here you have a flower shop, etc.). I think if you can't recognize a cheese shop when you see one, you are in big trouble.

Now I did used to like the Michelin green guide walking tours the best and have used them. Also, their book is the most detailed in looking up information as to what you see on the walking tours, and describing its history, art, etc. in detail.

I don't know if they still have them in the Greenguide, however, as they revised them a few years ago, and changed some things I used to like. I think maybe they got rid of them, not sure. If not, I'd vote for them, but I'm not that familiar with Frommers or Eyewitness.

I think Steinbicker's are good for day trips (I consider the book invaluble), but I don't remember it being top rated for within Paris. I don't know, I'll have to check it over again to see what he has. For his day trips, he has good routes, maps, and mentions of things to see, but there isn't a tremendous amount of detail about the things. It's not like Michelin in that regard.
Christina is online now  
Mar 17th, 2006, 02:06 PM
  #6  
 
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I'm a guidebook junkie & have over 6 feet of shelf space dedicated to guidebooks about France. There is another 3 feet of shelfspace for maps.

My favorite book for walks in Paris is "Walking Paris" by Gilles Desmons. It's easy to find books to get you to the Pl Madeleine, Opera, etc. I judge walking books by how extensive their walks are in the 16th Arr, The Park Monceau district, and also east of the Bastille. Most books barely touch the 16th, and it has some magnificent art nouveau buildings and some interesting areas & parks to explore.

I also like the Cadogan guide to Paris, which has many walks in the main areas. There is a 3 book series by Thirza Vallois that covers a huge portion of Paris - but it may not be for the first timer, or even the 6th timer. "Slow walks in Paris" by Michael Leitch is also quite good, but it may not be in print anymore.

There is another book called "Unexplored Paris" by Rodolphe Trouilleux that has 180 places described that most tourists don't find on their own, but are very interesting. We use this book quite a bit, and mark the various "unexplored" places on the "Walking Paris" book.

I have been using the Michelin Green Guide less & less, but for the first 8-10 trips to Paris, it is indespensible. I have the "cards" also, but did not find them to be that great, compared to the books I have.

Stu Dudley
StuDudley is offline  
Mar 17th, 2006, 06:24 PM
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Another vote for "Walking Paris" by Gilles Desmons. I've completed most of his walks and look forward to walking the 16th next month. Stu, I've tried to find "Unexplored Paris" by Trouileux but can only find a French edition; is it published in English? Surfside6, my first trip I followed walks from the Frommer's guide and found them very good for a first visit. Actually, in retrospect, the Frommer's walks were better than very good so if you have Frommer's already don't hesitate to walk these.
Margaretlb is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 06:31 AM
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Great suggestions! (my logon at work is SurfSide6).

I used the Michelin Green guide when I traveled to Paris 20 years ago and really liked it. I called their company last week and found that they have not updated that guide since 2001. They have just released a Paris and Northern France guide but I would prefer just the Paris one. The Paris guide is available at my library and I will look it over.

The Paris Walks guide is available and I may order it from Amazon. My partner has scolded me because I already have so many guides!

I tried sitting down and mapping out a walk using Degas' suggestions in the Marais. It worked out quite well but perhaps that is because specific streets were mentioned and it was easy to follow.

The bottom line is that I researched all the different sites. I know the flavor of a city is in it's streets areas. I would like to experience as many of those "flavors" as possible.
InMiami is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 06:47 AM
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Fodor's recently quoted several people from here in their new guidebooks - I'm surprised they didn't use Degas' walks too; they (the walks) are very good!
grantop is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 07:44 AM
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Having just rreturned from Paris, here are my thoughts. We had Rick Steves with us and we had Degas' walks. throughour travels we have foundout that we actually never follow walking tours. What we do is read through the tours and see what appeals to us and then with map in hand kind of set off to do our thing. This allows us to veer off the path to see what interests us and also allows us to skip things we know don't interest us. So many tours have the usual, "...and this is he house so and so lived in." Frankly, a lot of times, the places themselves aren't that interesting; it is the people themselves who lived there that are.
julies is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 08:55 AM
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Like others, I like to read many versions of hte same walking tour and take a combination of what interests our family in particular.

I do love my Paris Michelin guide, though, and in addition to their own walks, it recommends the following website:
http://parisbalades.com/Autre/defaulte.htm

I found it very helpful!

Dina
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Mar 18th, 2006, 09:29 AM
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>>Stu, I've tried to find "Unexplored Paris" by Trouileux but can only find a French edition; is it published in English?<<

Yes - it's in English. I purchased mine in Paris - don't know where specifically, but many of major museums have lots of English guide books.

Stu Dudley
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Mar 18th, 2006, 09:38 AM
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I kick myself not buying it one rainy day in the Marais . At a bookstore but don't remember the street. Not rtoo far from Vielle du Temple.
cigalechanta is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 10:23 AM
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cigalechanta
Date: 03/17/2006, 05:12 pm
Chronicle books puts out a boxed set of cards, "City Walks: Paris"
50 adventures on foot. You can take one or two cards with you for the areas you would like to walk through.
Here is another vote for this little pack of cards. I loved only having to take one card with me. I used Rick Steves and some of the Fodorites' suggestions too, by adding them to the card or guide book while doing my research before the trip.

I hope I can find the same format for other cities..
everittp is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 11:01 AM
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You can purchase the English version of "Unexplored Paris" from Amazon. Just go to the advanced search & put in the author's name - Rodolphe Trouilleux. They display the French version, and an English version titled "Unexplored Paris 2003". The cover is different than my book, but if you enlarge the book cover, it says it's in Ehglish. Mine was published in '97, so I presume this is a later edition. The price is a whopper for a paperback - $36.46. The price tag is still on mine, and it's 18.29Euro.

Stu Dudley
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Mar 18th, 2006, 01:58 PM
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Dina, fantastic site! The pictures that go along with the dialog are great. I will have to explore the entire site.
InMiami is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 02:00 PM
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oops, dialogue
InMiami is offline  
Mar 18th, 2006, 05:29 PM
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Hi Stu, I checked out the book on Amazon and yes the cover IS in English as you detected, but if you read the description of the book from the seller, they say the text is in French. I think the photo they used might just be a stock photo and not a picture of the exact book they have for sale. Just wanted to comment so if anyone was thinking of purchasing they could check into it before they bought it.
grantop is offline  
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