Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Flying only the first half of a R/T ticket

Flying only the first half of a R/T ticket

Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 08:50 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 836
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Flying only the first half of a R/T ticket

Seems like I've heard that airlines are cracking down on this sort of thing...but how can they if you use the outbound portion of your ticket....and never show for the return? We need one/way travel to England (from Boston)to board a cruise that will bring us back....IS there any reason I shouldn't try to book us on a cheaper R/T ticket, and just not use the return? Thanks!
tuckerdc is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 08:54 AM
  #2  
P_M
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 23,367
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
A lady in my office needed a one-way ticket from Ireland to AUS. She found it was cheaper to buy R/T and not use the return portion. She had no problems. I don't see what the airlines can do to crack down on this. It's not like they are incurring a loss because you DON'T show up for a flight.
P_M is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 08:57 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 49,519
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I haven't heard anything about airlines cracking down on this, and I agree - how does it hurt them

Our family of four did this a few years ago. The cost of a RT ticket Rome-Marseilles/Marseilles-Rome was less than half the cost of a one-way, so all four of us flew from Rome to Marseilles and tossed the other tickets.
StCirq is online now  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 09:00 AM
  #4  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,699
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi tuck,

Of course you can do it, and it is unlikely that the airline will do anything about it.

They can, if they wish to, bill you for the one way ticket. Read the contract.

ira is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 09:07 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 19,000
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
You're saving them fuel, Coke, and peanuts (plus the odd bottle of cheap Chardonnay). Why would they want it otherwise?
Robespierre is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 10:24 AM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,885
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Nothing will happen, although you are breaking the fare rules.

That said, you may also look into www.aerlingus.com. The airline just simplified their fares, and they do sell one-way fares. In June it's about $300 from Boston to London connecting in Shannon or Dublin.
AAFrequentFlyer is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 11:23 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 15,749
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
When they come to your house to arrest you for not using the return, just insist that you were there, but couldn't clear customs in time and you missed the flight. Then DEMAND they pay you half your fare back since they didn't provide you with the return. That ought to work.


In case you can't tell, I'm kidding. Tear up the ticket for the return and don't look back.
Patrick is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 11:43 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,605
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If you have a balance in freq fly miles with this airline, they might choose to deduct some miles; they might also pass the extra fare to the travel agent who requested your ticket.
http://www.thetravelinsider.info/2002/0816.htm

However, on the ASTA website it lists this 'passenger right':
"Use all, part or none of the segments on any ticket purchased.
Use of a combination of roundtrip tickets, a ticket with a point beyond the consumer's final destination, or only one leg of a roundtrip ticket is sometimes necessary to achieve the most economical travel under an airline's fare structure. Regardless of an airline's fare restriction policies, and in keeping with the treatment of all other consumer purchases, a consumer who purchases a ticket buys the right, but never the obligation, to travel to the points covered by the fare. "
http://www.astanet.com/govaffairs/trav_rights.asp
Travelnut is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 11:57 AM
  #9  
P_M
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 23,367
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Very funny, Patrick.

I don't mean to hijack this thread, but why in the heck do they charge more for one-way than R/T? That makes no logical sense.
P_M is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 12:16 PM
  #10  
rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 13,194
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<<why in the heck do they charge more for one-way than R/T?>>

For one-way travel - - which is fully refundable, changeable and can be bought at the last minute (as many business people require) - - they charge the full, logical and TRUE price of providing that seat in a profitable way. For some (many) kinds of roundtrip tickets, they offer substantial (sometimes huge) discounts because they know that people will tolerate paying, in advance, for both directions, with such conditions as non-flexible return - - to get the reduced fares.

They fill up as many seats as they can, each at the highest price they can get for the varying needs of the travelers willing to buy them.

Best wishes,

Rex
rex is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 12:28 PM
  #11  
JP
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 182
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If you check around you may find one-way tickets that are cheaper than round-trip (such as the AerLingus deal mentioned above). Try consolidators (listed in your travel section, or online ones like airdeals and justfares).

I've taken one-way transatlantic flights several times in the past few years, and have always found cheaper fares than the best round-trip ones.
JP is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 12:29 PM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 34,193
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I don't really know, actually, it doesn't make any sense to me either (one-way tickets are not by definition full-fare or last minute, I'm not sure if that is what Rex is implying, that they must be). Some carriers don't charge more, such as Southwest in the US, where each leg is whatever price it is, whether you go one-way or RT.

I suspect it may be because they think one-way fares are more attractive to business people who can pay more. That is the usual reason, but I'll admit I don't really see why that would be true, as most business people must return, also, but that's usually the reason fares are higher inexplicably.

I read an explanation once which made some sense to me, but unfortunately, I can't recall the reasoning (I guess it isn't intuitive).
Christina is online now  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 12:29 PM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,271
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This has been discussed before...

Technically it is a violation of the airline's tariffs. Your ticket, in highly legal terms, is a contract where you agree to abide by the tariff rules for a particular fare and the airline agrees to provide transportation.

Over the years, dodges around the airline's illogical fare structure have been devised including back to back ticketing (discussed by me on the airlines forum), hidden cities and this one i.e. using 1/2 of a return ticket.

That's the theory. Back in the long ago era when passengers actually used travel agents (you remember travel agents, don't you) the travel agents were threatened with debit notices for selling tickets in violation of the tariffs and of course if the agent was debited, then the agent would supposedly go after the customer.

That's the theory.

In practice, it is highly highly unlikely that anything will happen although technically they could bill your credit card for the difference in fare or take it out on your frequent flyer miles.

What are the odds of anything happening? About 1,000 to 1 so go for it.
xyz123 is offline  
Old Jan 3rd, 2005, 12:30 PM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,885
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I explained this few times here, but let';s try it again.

Airlines have many different fares for the same class of service. The very cheap economy tickets have many restrictions, such as minimum stays, Saturday stay, traveling on certain days, etc.

The more expensive the economy tickets the less restrictions, including no minimum stays, no Saturday stays, etc.

So, in order for the airline to sell the more expensive tickets to the people that can't have restrictions, the airline has to sell a one-way ticket at a 1/2 price of the no-restriction tickets, NOT the very cheap, very restricted tickets. If they did sell one way tickets for 1/2 price of the cheap economy ticket, the entire fare structure would collapse. Everybody would be buying one-way cheap tickets, thus avoiding all the restrictions.

As much as most tourist don't think this is fair and many think it's stupid, it is the higher fares that allow the airlines to sell certain number of deeply discounted fares. If the airlines were to have just one fare for each class of service, the coach ticket may cost about $2000, not $500 that one can find on US-Europe routes, so then most of the leiosure travelers would be crying about the high cost of flying.

So as silly as this may look to the casual flyer, s/he should enjoy the benefits of these structured fares.

AAFrequentFlyer is offline  
Old Jan 4th, 2005, 08:25 AM
  #15  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 836
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks to all for the helpful and informative responses! I especially liked reading that ASTA language and the Aer Lingus tip. Looks like we go looking for the cheapest avaialble fare, r/t or not.
tuckerdc is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
HumbleDave
United States
8
Jun 4th, 2007 06:24 PM
socialworker
United States
13
Sep 26th, 2006 07:25 AM
abqdeb
United States
5
Jul 16th, 2004 06:27 AM
LT
United States
14
Dec 23rd, 2002 02:01 PM
hawaiibound?
Air Travel
13
Oct 10th, 2002 07:54 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:17 AM.