Favorite Paris Markets

Jun 18th, 2005, 05:16 AM
  #21  
 
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Many will have them. Richard Lenoir is one. Also look up in Montmartre on the street up to the funiculaire.
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Jun 18th, 2005, 05:18 AM
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Julie and I like the very same book...I picked mine up on ebay for under $10.00 and it's worth 10 times that to me!

A friend sent me this article this morning from The Independent...which has a great travel section BTW..

http://travel.independent.co.uk/low_...&host=2&dir=36
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Jun 21st, 2005, 01:16 PM
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Aug 7th, 2007, 10:02 AM
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Aug 7th, 2007, 01:10 PM
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The misinformation on this thread practically has me rolling around laughing on the floor.
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Aug 7th, 2007, 01:34 PM
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Then please clear it up, Kerouac. Some of us take anything written on Fodor's as gospel.

(That request for clarification is not snide, BTW. We'll be in Paris in October, and I have had this thread in my notes for some time.)

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Aug 7th, 2007, 02:09 PM
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The BHV has great areas for home improvement, and even has a hidden little cafe that looks like a workshop. La Samaritaine used to be similar but then it got snooty (thanks, LVMH), and now it's closed.

Dangerous places for me are the FNAC or Surcouf, since I like computers, cameras, and A/V gadgets and related stuff.

Monoprix is everywhere. It's a very ordinary supermarket chain in France—however, it's exactly the place to go if you want to see local French people and the kinds of things they buy. If you want fancy grocery shopping indoors, go to La Grande Epicerie at Le Bon Marché, or try the smaller gourmet food halls at Galeries Lafayette or Printemps.
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Aug 7th, 2007, 10:47 PM
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Here is the official list of Paris street markets and their operating days and hours: http://tinyurl.com/kd4hd

This is not to be confused with market streets like Cler or Montorgueil.

You might want to note that there are far more markets in the outer arrondissements than in the center of Paris, where are few markets continue to survive by selling items to tourists for double the price. I'm not surprised that a lot of people find Paris to be expensive.
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Aug 8th, 2007, 07:38 AM
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Aug 8th, 2007, 08:25 AM
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Aug 8th, 2007, 08:26 AM
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Thank you for that list, Kerouac! I will add it to my Paris Notes.

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Aug 8th, 2007, 10:43 AM
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kerouac:

To my observation, most tourists visiting markets in Paris are wandering through for a look, some purchasing "picnic" foods.

If the "few markets continue to survive by selling items to tourists for double the price", where do the people who live in Paris shop for their food?

Are they paying inflated tourist prices? If not for the tourists, would they have no place to shop?
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Aug 8th, 2007, 10:46 AM
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There are very few residents in the center of Paris compared to the outer arrondissements. They pay the price for living there -- or they shop elsewhere.
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Aug 8th, 2007, 11:03 AM
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For example, the population of the 1st arrondissement has dropped from 89,519 in 1861 (highest recorded population) to about 16,000. The population of the 15th arrondissement (the most heavily populated) is about 230,000. Nevertheless, it too has gone down from the high point in 1862 when it was 250,551. In any case, it has more shopping opportunities than the center.
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Aug 8th, 2007, 11:37 PM
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If you want to make your life easy although the maps and metro do make getting around Paris easy enough - do yourself a favour - take a tom tom or navman navigator along. You will have no problem finding anything even when you are walking. Enjoy the markets.
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Aug 10th, 2007, 11:24 AM
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According to Le petit parisien, a Paris street and transportation guide which includes the ambulatory marchés information, there are no such marchés in the first and second arrondissements. I would consider a marché such as the one on the Place Maubert--5th arrondissement-- to be for the local population and not just for the tourists.
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Aug 12th, 2007, 03:52 AM
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The markets are for Parisians, for heaven's sake, and as DJKBooks says, "we" wander through them for the local flavor, the gorgeous displays of vegetables, the endless numbers of olives, the steaming choucroute garnie on the burner, etc. Oh, and to buy tinned foie gras.
I have also bought darling smocked dresses for our granddaughters at less than they were in the shops. Our DDIL bought a ski jacket at Richard Lenoir one time when it turned cold and she needed one--I think it was $12. I just don't have ANY idea where she could have gotten it for $6, but Kerouac, please do tell us.
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Aug 12th, 2007, 06:21 AM
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Tati (www.tati.fr) at Barbès Rochechouart would have been a good place to look for the $6 jacket... Its prices put Wal-Mart to shame.
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Aug 12th, 2007, 06:27 AM
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