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Extended Holiday stay (6 months) question - France

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Oct 27th, 2009, 12:04 AM
  #21
 
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Don't forget -- for the Visa application, you need to provide the following documents in French (if it is in English it needs to be officially translated into French):

From http://www.consulfrance-houston.org/...hp?article1301


- A note, dated and signed by the applicant, stating that he/she does not intend to have in France a paid professional activity which requires a work permit.

- Proof of medical insurance with coverage valid in France. Letter from the insurance company only : the card is not sufficient.

- A non criminal record certificate to be obtained at the police’s office of the city of residence.

- Deed of your house/apartment in France. (You need to already have a place of residency)

- Processing fees: by credit card (Visa, Mastercard) cash or money-order only. Personal checks or American Express are not accepted. NOTE: Some French Embassies / Consulates only accept CASH for the Visa application!


When you have all your documents ready, call the French embassy and ask if you need to make an appointment in order to apply for a Visa. It's very likely that you do need an appointment.

Make sure you have the correct application forms and fill them out exactly as instructed. All documents that you provide need to be original (not copies). Show up extra early to the French embassy to get your paperwork processed. It may take up to several months to get your Visa.
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Oct 27th, 2009, 01:44 AM
  #22
 
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If you decide to apply for a Schengen visa you must do that at the embassy of the country you will first be entering - so France if landing in Paris, but Germany if landing in Frankfurt for instance.
Do not apply for one from France if you are flying into (or entering by another means) another Schengen country first.
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Oct 27th, 2009, 02:08 AM
  #23
 
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You apply to the embassy of the Schengen country that is your main destination (i.e. staying the longest), or the first Schengen country you arrive at if your stay in each Schengen state is of equal length.
So if you intend to stay in France for a month but only for a week in Germany, even if you land in Frankfurt first before travelling on to Paris, you apply for your visa at the French embassy.
As Americans don't require a visa for tourist stay up to 90 days, this information is irrelevant. If you are applying for a long-stay visa for France (longer than 90 days), you will need type D visa, but usually such visa allows you to enter France via another Schengen state, but only within 5 days. It's usually indicated by '+5 days transit Schengen' on your visa.
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Oct 27th, 2009, 02:43 AM
  #24
 
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Alec, lufalcon intends to spend 6 months touring Europe by bike - so a visa is required and they will need it from the first country they enter since they will be touring.
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Oct 27th, 2009, 03:14 AM
  #25
 
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I don't think you can get a visa that allows you to tour through Schengen states for 6 months. You can get a Schengen visa up to 90 days, or no visa if you are Americans or some other nationality. Then there is type D visa that is issued by individual country according to its national regulations, and allows you to stay in that country for longer than 3 months, and 90-in-180 days through the rest of Schengen, once you register your residence in the country that issued the visa. The trouble with type D visa is that you need to satisfy the authorities that you will be staying in their country, backed up by rental agreement for your accommodation for the duration of your visa's validity. So it's not really suitable for someone touring through Schengen, without a fixed base. You can I suppose get a refundable rental in France for the purpose of visa application, and then cancel it once your visa is through, but this is strictly speaking illegal and may have implications when you want to register your residence and get your residence permit.
If you, in your scenario, apply to the German embassy for a 6-month Schengen visa to allow you to tour through Schengen, it will almost certainly be refused, because you won't actually be staying long-term in Germany.
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Oct 27th, 2009, 09:17 AM
  #26
 
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Alec, the OP isn't touring through Schengen. The OP is looking for Visa requirements for a long-stay period in France (more than 90 days).
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Oct 27th, 2009, 09:47 AM
  #27
 
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nancicita: "Alec, the OP isn't touring through Schengen. The OP is looking for Visa requirements for a long-stay period in France (more than 90 days)."

The OP's questions were answered months ago (this is an old thread)

We are trying to help lufalcon who topped this thread 2 days ago.
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Oct 27th, 2009, 10:07 AM
  #28
 
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Thanks janisj for the clarification.
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Nov 11th, 2009, 09:45 PM
  #29
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Alec - thanks for your information. I started this thread and I see that others are interested.

I have reviewed the new (June 2010) regulations for a long stay visa for France. I will be applying for this next month or January for a 5 month holiday in France in 2010. If I read this correctly, this will provide me the status of a resident. Here is the quote:

"The applicant must require a long stay visa, valid as a resident card, for any stay longer than 90 days in France. If granted this visa is like a resident card , valid for as long as one year..."

This statement is very important to me as I intend to buy a motorcycle in Paris and my understanding to do this and obtain a new Carte Gris and insurance, I need to show proof of residency.

Alec, you appear to be very knowledgeable on French regulations. Do you think this will allow me to buy, license and insure the motorcycle?

Thanks for your assistance.

RetiredTraveler
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Nov 12th, 2009, 01:20 AM
  #30
 
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Yes, with your carte de séjour, you should be able to register and insure a motorcycle, as you will be a legal French resident.
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Nov 12th, 2009, 05:44 AM
  #31
 
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You can also use a letter from friends saying that you are staying with them to register and insure a vehicle. Once you have a rental set up, you can use the lease (bail).

Peter
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Nov 12th, 2009, 05:47 AM
  #32
 
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And worth pointing out that you don't have to be tax resident to own a car in France. Many 2nd home owners have a French registered car in their garage for use during visits.

The key info seems to be proof of residence - often in the form of a utility invoice.

Peter
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Nov 12th, 2009, 06:13 AM
  #33
 
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Check into which insurance company will insure a non-EU driver's license.

Not all do.. expect to pay a premium.
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Nov 12th, 2009, 08:30 AM
  #34
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Lincasanova - I got a French drivers license when I lived in Paris from 2003 to 2007 (I still have it) and had motorcycle insurance then too. Maybe this will allow for a normal rate and also help facilitate me buying and registering a motorcycle.

mpprh - you message is getting me excited. I have been worrying and struggling in finding a way to legally buy, register, license and insure a motorcycle for when I come for 5 months next year. I will use a notarized letter from a friend who will let me stay in his apartment during that time to show to the French Consulate in getting my long term visa. However, I am not sure they will issue me a Carte Sejour, in fact, I don't know what they will give me, whether it is simply a Visa or what? Do you know what the new program provides?

Once I get over the hurdle of buying the motorcycle, I will store it in a friends garage over the winter and use it each Summer I return to Paris.

I don't know what you mean about "Once you have a rental set up, you can use the lease (bail)". Do you mean if I rented an apartment for 5 months that I could use my lease document as proof of residence? Will a letter from my friend certifying I will live with him for 5 months be sufficient?

Looking forward to your response.

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Nov 12th, 2009, 11:38 AM
  #35
 
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Sounds like you are very well set up.
At least in Spain, a letter from your friend, plus registering at your friend's address at city hall should suffice.
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Nov 12th, 2009, 02:55 PM
  #36
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lincasanova - Please explain registering at city hall. Is there some form I need to complete as a visitor? Is this a requirement if I live with a friend for 5 months? Sorry to ask so many questions but I am just trying to be well informed before I go.

RetiredTravelor
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Nov 12th, 2009, 11:31 PM
  #37
 
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I do not know 100% for France, but if you are getting a residency card in the end, after your visa is issued, then one must always prove local residence. ( I do not know what type of VISA you are getting and if the end product of this VISA is a resident permit).

In Spain, when one comes with a visa to convert to resident permit, and I assume there is something VERY similar in France, one "signs up" at the nearest city hall. They then provide a proof of residence letter for you to take to the police, along with the other documents, to finish applying for the resident permit.

Same goes for resgistering a car for yearly local road taxes.

Once you are told exactly which documents you will need after getting the visa ( step one) to present to get a resident permit once in France, you can ask where to get those additional documents.

It may vary country to country but if it is anything similar to Spain, once there you will need an additional document only attainable in France.

Good luck. It will all be spelled out for you, I am sure, once you start the process.
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Nov 13th, 2009, 03:14 AM
  #38
 
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We bought our car in France before we moved here, but after we had bought our house. Therefore we had an address, even though at the time we were not 'resident', i.e. living here. We did not have a carte de sejour. We also had Canadian drivers’ licenses, which were accepted with no question.

Proof of ‘residency’ could be either a utility bill, or a letter from the Mayor confirming that we had an address. We did the latter, as we were having all our bills sent to Toronto, and had left them there.

More of a problem may be getting short term insurance coverage. I don’t know, as we insured the car by the year, for when we came on holidays. Since we had our French bank account, the payments came out of that.

In fact we bought our car the night before we were coming back to Canada, from an old couple who had driven it less than 25 000 km. in 14 years. We asked them to look after it for us, as we didn’t actually have time to insure it before we went back. No problem’ he said, ‘I will look after it as if it were still my own.’ We came back 6 months later wondering if we’d been very foolish - the owner might have resold our car and denied ever meeting us! In fact, he had bought a new car, which was parked on the street, and ours was in his garage. ‘I told you I would look after it’ he said. We shared a drink, (apple juice) drove the car home, and became friends.
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Nov 13th, 2009, 09:17 AM
  #39
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A letter from the Mayor looks like what I may need to do. I believe if I show my Visa and letter from my friend who is a resident in Paris indicating I will stay with him, this may be what I need to eliminate problems buying a motorcycle.

Thanks for the information. You know, surely there are others who have done this or are retired and spend 4 or 5 months in France on extended holidays and wanted to buy a motorcycle. I have been looking for someone who has done exactly this using the long term visa and have never found a person who did this. I have been trying to put all the bits and pieces together from many sources including this forum to learn what I need to do to get through the process. The entire reason I will be going to France is to explore France on a motorcycle and to get there and find out I can not do this scares me. I am beginning to see that there is a path to follow that might get me safely through the legal requirements.

Thanks to all.
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Nov 13th, 2009, 10:31 AM
  #40
 
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I'd like to add a comment that may or may not be relevant to you. I entered France with a one-time only entry permit and a right to apply for a one-year carte de sejour. Once all the paperwork for the carte de sejour was submitted in France, it took 3 1/2 months to receive it. During that time I was technically not allowed to leave France and reenter. Reentry by car or, in your case, moto, is less problematic than flying back in.
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