Ever go see a movie in another country?

Old Mar 2nd, 2005, 11:02 PM
  #21  
 
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I saw About A Boy in Ireland, but the real fun for me is going to see a movie in Melbourne, Australia, which I've done several times.

Always take the Gold plan from a local theater chain there that entails a private entrance through the projection room, a private lounge room with your own included drink bar and popcorn dispenser and a big comfy couch or recliner with drink hoders and tables in an elevated row at the back of the usual cinema. A semi-plush treat for around $5 US more. Saw one of the LOTR and a few others like this.

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Old Mar 2nd, 2005, 11:23 PM
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In one of the Scandnavian countries we went to a movie, before the show started we had wine in the lobby and had another glass at our seats. Our seats were assigned but we didn't know and when another couple stood in front of us and said we were in their seats we were "outraged" and mumbled about their nerve, just because they must come there every week, it's not "their seats"! We moved down the aisle and watched a pretty steamy Roman Polansky movie. I heard later when it opened in the US it had been tamed down alot. Only later did we find out that there actually were assigned seats. I owe that couple an apology.

BTW,the odd part was all of the assigned seats were clumped together in the middle of the theatre but no one moved to one of the many empty seats where it would be more comfortable, except us.
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Old Mar 2nd, 2005, 11:46 PM
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Recently saw Neverland in London. As a teen, we used to watch movies in La Napoule at an open-air theatre that was not a drive-in, but a "walk-in." You took your picnic and your blanket to sit on the ground. Saw Cabaret in Amsterdam or Rotterdam, cannot remember it was so long ago, too young at the time to appreciate irony of seeing that movie in Europe.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 12:46 AM
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Several years ago I watched "Wag the Dog" in Skopje, Macedonia with Macedonian subtitles. If you will recall that was about a US president manufacturing a fake war on Albania in order to distract the voters from a brewing scandal.

My friends thought the movie was pretty stupid -- but then the next summer I think, Macedonia was embroiled in a conflict between Slav & Albanians! Talk about life imitating art
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 12:57 AM
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I remember seeng M*A*S*H, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and the Graduate in movie theaters in Aix-en-Provence when I was a student there -- can I say it -- 35 years ago. They were all dubbed in French!
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 01:12 AM
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Hi

I normally go to see movies when I'm travelling. I have been to movies in the US, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, South Africa etc. It is a bit fun to go to the movies in Thailand. The national anthem is played before the movies and everybody gets up from their chairs. It is fun to see the people that hasn't experienced (or heard about this before). I also remember seeing a movie in KL in Malaysia. The movie was subtitled in what I think was Malay and Chinese and it was of course a bit confusing

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Gard
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 01:56 AM
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On our first trip to Paris, some thirty years ago, my husband and I went to see Woody Allen's "All You Wanted to Know About Sex But Were Afraid To Ask". It was an English soundtrack with French subtitles. First, we were surprised to find that it was customary to tip the usher. Then we were surprised when the movie began to find ourselves laughing out loud alone just a few seconds ahead of the rest of the audience. On a lot of the really funny lines, the audience were laughing so loud that we would miss the next spoken line and since we didn't read much French, some of the humor was lost on us. I still remember the evening vividly, and I remember we had to watch the movie again when we got home to see what we had missed. However, what I don't remember is why on earth we ever decided to spend a few of our very precious hours in romantic Paris watching an American movie!
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 07:16 AM
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Yes - we have been to a couple in London and seen a bunch in Paris. FYI - Paris - like NYC - is a very cinema town. As well as the first run movies (English laguage movies shown in english are noted VO in the ads - usualy at the big first run cinemas on the Grandes Boulevards) there are alwasy as least a few themes festivals (by actor, director, genre etc) running - which we often enjoy more. In festivals the movies are always run in their original language - just check the papers for one you would enjoy.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 07:34 AM
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"(English laguage movies shown in english are noted VO in the ads - usualy at the big first run cinemas on the Grandes Boulevards."

But again, don't be fooled into thinking that VO means English, they are often just as likely to be Spanish, German, Italian, or even Japanese movies in THOSE original languages with French subtitles -- no English within a mile of them!
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 07:34 AM
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I went to a movie in a small town in Italy last October, "Shall We Dance" with Richard Gere. They don't do subtitles often. It was the only theater in the center of town and our only choice. It was dubbed into Italian which is the norm in Italy.

My biggest surprise--there was an intermission in the middle of the film. The projector was stopped at the end of a scene, the lights came up, and we had 2-3 minutes for a quick bathroom break or candy run. My friend told me this is normal for all theaters throughout Italy.

She also told me that many cinemas in Italy are closing, even in larger cities. Cable TV and videos are taking their toll.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 07:50 AM
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Yes, from time to time. I remember seeing one of the Star Wars movies in Glasgow years ago. Most recently, we saw Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban in Oban, Scotland last summer -- not far from the areas around Glenfinnan and Loch Shiel where parts of the movie were filmed and through which we had just driven a day or two before. Also, it was a tiny little theater that seated about 30, so it was almost like watching a movie at home.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 07:52 AM
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Years ago, during a semester abroad in France, my roommates and I went to lots of movies during the weekday, student discount showings. Many of the American movies were in English with French subtitles. Many times we would be laughing out loud, while the French audience was stone quiet. Either the translation was poor, or the joke was "too American" for them to understand. I also remember that our French classmates were given the assignment to attend these movies to help improve their English.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 09:02 AM
  #33  
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A footnote about "humor culture gap": When we went to see "Fargo" in North Carolina, we had just moved here from the Midwest. You could tell who, in that movie theater, had ever lived in the Midwest by who laughed at what. Native Tar Heels "got" some of the basic absurdities, of course, but not things like Marge pulling her parka around her at 0 degrees, saying "feels like it's gonna get chillier" and some of the phrasing that's pure MidWest.

("Gonna leave 'im home or gonna take-with?")
 
Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 09:44 AM
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I was impressed in Canada, they have these "salt stations" with several different flavor salts and you hold your popcorn over a grate and shake away...I thought it was neat anyway...
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 09:57 AM
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Saw "Little Women", the OLD version, with Kate Hepburn, long ago in a little town in Japan. I remember the Japanese script subtitles flowing vertically along the side of the screen and not horizontally across the bottom. I also remember how hot a summer evening it was, with everyone carrying and using a nice paper fan in that old-fashioned building which had neither heat or A/C!
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 10:03 AM
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Quite some time ago I saw "Tootsie" when we were in Ravenna, Italy. It was dubbed in Italian of course. What fun!

The Italian TV is hystercial, I can't stop laughing.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 10:03 AM
  #37  
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Gladiator in London at Trafalger Sq.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 12:08 PM
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Patrick is correct. VO just means original version - the movie will be shown in whatever language it was originally made.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 12:23 PM
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Went to see the movie 10 with Dudley Moore and Bo Derek, a long, long time ago. Not a great movie, but it was in English with Greek subtitles. The experience of being on a date with a gorgeous Greek boy, sitting in a deck chair under the stars on a rooftop in Corfu Greece was very memorably. Ah!!!
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Old Mar 3rd, 2005, 12:33 PM
  #40  
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Twice--the first time was in Italy and, fortunately, it was in English with Italian subtitles. The next time they dubbed in Italian and, though I speak a bit, I only caught about 25% tops of what was being said. It was fun, though. If you are familiar with the voices are so different that it's rather comical. That and watching the lips move for one second and the dubbing go on for several more (or vice versa).

One way to get a feel for what it's like is to not use the headset when watching an in-flight movie. If you can imagine doubling what you've just comprehended, you'll get an idea of what you might take away from the movie in an unfamiliar language.
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