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Europeans: What is YOUR attitude about smoking?

Europeans: What is YOUR attitude about smoking?

Old Feb 4th, 2002, 03:48 PM
  #61  
Elizabeth
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I am American.I do not like smoke but realize that when I travel I am outside of the U.S.
It is all about personal choice. I can choose to go or I can choose to stay at home.
 
Old Feb 4th, 2002, 03:54 PM
  #62  
buzz off
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Smokey 's post is about smoking, please behave and don't turn this into a political rant, we have enough problems in the world.
 
Old Feb 4th, 2002, 04:24 PM
  #63  
Laura
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Lordy Lordy. There will always be smokers in Europe as well as the USA, It is NOT illegal and will never be due to the amount of money it generates. I'm and American ex-smoker (2 years clean) but I have NO right to tell others what to do with their bodies....don't give me the 2nd hand smoke crap, if you don't like the heat get out of the kitchen. And please don't feed me the line about how much tax payers $ are spent on the smoker with lung disease....our country has a bigger demon eating tax payer $ and it's called obesity. 60% of our population now, I consider that a crime that needs to be handled.
 
Old Feb 4th, 2002, 09:00 PM
  #64  
yesterday's prof
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My response was to Eurofemme who wrote: "Why are Americans so snoopy? If you think about it you have a reputation for a reason". Then the response from xxxx was: "Do Americans have a reputation for being snoopy?"Erlsegaard put it so clearly in his/her response and I applaud her-- another point: The war was going on for at least two years before the Americans came into it and only after a great deal of cohersion. We didn't want to be "snoopy" that was the whole point. It was called "isolationism". If you all were so cool how come you couldn't beat the Germans on your own? Because they were so powerful, so organized, so very good at what they did. By the time we got there it was a done deal. Face it. You couldn't do it alone. If you could have you wouldn't have needed us. That's not to say that we won the war for you. But you couldn't do it without us. And no one said anything about Normandy. I don't watch war films unless they are documentaries. So go smoke a bunch of cigarettes and let yourself think how cool you are.

What are the cancer statistics in Europe, anyway? I often wonder that while breathing tons of second hand smoke in cafés.
 
Old Feb 5th, 2002, 12:32 PM
  #65  
Shain
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Hi "Fodorites",
well - not in general - but americans are trivial complainers! Especially because they call themself "free".

I found during the last 12 years that I have travel frweuntly to the US and many other countries, that in fact in goes a bit too far with their
"non-smoking" restrictions.
Especially I think for someone like me,
who never had smoked before, but do accept smokers like any other person .

Especially because I do understand why smokers want to "smoke" on special occasions like after dinner, or while under stress or whatever.

Of course there are always two points of view, but as long as smokers are not
provocativ or disturbingly heavy smokers and also keep understanding non smokers, I think it's a give and take.

And for nonsmokers, to be militant against smokers, is absolutely the wrong way and only brings more stress with it.

I agree also with non-smokers and in fact it is something that brings down your health, but on the other hand, to believe, you live much heathier as an vegetarian or non-drinker or whatever seems to be extrem, I think is a misunderstanding of what's really godd for a man/woman or in fact turns out
bad too.

So, feel disturbed by persons who are not allowed to go for their very own freedom, because they react stressed and disharmonized. I think this really is the wrong way.

So smokers and non-smokers - tolerance I guess - that is the keyword - and
balance between those good and bad habits we all have as humans.

What else could be more freedom to society - so live it .
Shain/eu/de/dus
 
Old Feb 5th, 2002, 02:07 PM
  #66  
wondering
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Beano brings up an excellent point. How many smokers would be offended by noxious smells coming from other people?

Smokers, what would you do if you were sitting in a restaurant next to people who were giving off very noxious smells? Would you be tolerant of them? Would you still enjoy your meal?
 
Old Feb 5th, 2002, 03:54 PM
  #67  
Steve Martin
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Hey, that's my joke!
 
Old Feb 5th, 2002, 08:45 PM
  #68  
Pam
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There are those of us who are truly allergic to cigarette smoke. Within ten minutes of being exposed I am hacking my head off and get a wicked headache. Nothing ruins a meal faster than someone lighting up close to me.

The news has almost weekly articles published by the medical/scientific community documenting the negative effects of second hand smoke on non-smokers and smokers alike. Smokers certainly have the right to smoke, but I also have the right to breathe non-toxic air. I do appreciate all of the comments by the smokers who try and be as considerate as possible.

We travel extensively. I have found that I can rarely stay in reasonably priced hotels in Europe or Africa as they usually reek of smoke. We often eat early or try to eat outside with careful consideration of which way the wind is blowing. We rent cars instead of relying on public transportation. But, I am lucky that we can afford to do this.

I am an expat living abroad who is from Boulder. (By the way, smoking is allowed in bars there as long as they have contained areas with special ventilation systems.) There, we can enjoy restaurants, bars and outdoor entertainment without the nuisance of smoke.

I think that one point that many businesses miss is that many people like myself simply do not spend our money in establishments where we are not comfortable.

I do wish that travelers, particularly in airports would heed and respect the non-smoking signs. That is one place that I can't seem to remove myself from the smoke and I am truly miserable when I have to sit in a miasma of pollution for many hours waiting for a flight. Lord, I hate going through Amersterdam and Copenhagen. I will position myself by a non-smoking sign and then insist that people do not light up around me. Ugly American? So be it.

 
Old Feb 5th, 2002, 10:13 PM
  #69  
Jennifer
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I can't believe I'm adding to the fracas, but here is indeed an interesting thought that someone mentioned:

"Smokers, what would you do if you were sitting in a restaurant next to people who were giving off very noxious smells? Would you be tolerant of them? Would you still enjoy your meal?"

Thus, what if a person placed a can of Lysol or something that smelt of burning debris or a can of mixed chemicals (which is all that cigarettes are), (or any strong odor will do) with the dispensing spout pouring out steadily a stream of fumes and saturating the room. The spray got on everyone's clothing and hair and in their lungs. There was no way to escape the stench. Would people honestly have as much tolerance for that as non-smokers are expected to have for smokers?

Just a thought,

Jennifer
 
Old Feb 5th, 2002, 10:13 PM
  #70  
Dieter
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I am a German man who presently lives in Cologne.
I'm a nonsmoker and I do not care to smell any smoke.
This can be arranged with smoking and non-smoking sections in pubs.
 
Old Feb 5th, 2002, 10:37 PM
  #71  
marlboroman
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Jennifer: No, I would not have any tolerance for that. I want to be able to spew MY fumes and stench into the air without other people complaining but I don't want anyone else to do this with THEIR fumes and stench because if they do I'll complain.
 
Old Feb 6th, 2002, 07:11 AM
  #72  
Shain
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Hi Fodorites,
as I am living in the E.U. and traveledmuch around, I completely agree with Dieter - and - formyself - I am nonsmoker too.

Other countries other behaviours - so tolerate or stay at home.

Shain/eu/de/düsseldorf
 
Old Feb 6th, 2002, 07:20 AM
  #73  
Difference
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The last time I was in Paris, I was walking down Champs Elysees, and got very sad when I saw that this venerable street was turning into a regular American mall. I mean, Gap, Disney Store, McDonald's, etc...

I was pondering on this when I overheard two Americans talking behind me. They were saying "well, McD's takes care of the food, and the Gap takes care of the clothing, now if we can just do something about the stench of the people and the smokers, and Paris will be just like any American city!"

I thought they were making a sarcastic comment, but, alas, they were being quite serious...

I felt like hitting someone...
 
Old Feb 6th, 2002, 07:31 AM
  #74  
Shain
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Applause Difference.

But - I don't really think americans do it because they don't no other ways.
Go with the mainstream - and feel free to be at home wherever you are.

Those americans...tztztz

But we are definately not talking about american imperialism, at least not planned.
And I have to say - a Mc Donalds sometimes saves your "revenge of Montezuma" as it is always the same!

Enjoy to be not part of the mainstream.

Shain/eu/de/dus
 
Old Feb 6th, 2002, 03:58 PM
  #75  
r
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Capo; you asked the question why do Spanards outlive americans even though they smoke more? Do they? Do you have statistics? Someone asked earlier on this thread if anyone has any actual statistics on the cancer rate of the general population in european countries. That would be very telling.

There is a very high rate of cancer in the US which is why I think many of Americans are very sensitive about smoking and second hand smoke. Many of us have lost dear ones to lung cancer and other forms of cancer. If you have ever been to a cancer ward you would think twice about lighting up. I used to smoke but not after seeing victims of it gasping for their last breaths and regretting not having stopped sooner or even having smoked at all. As a hospice therapist I have counseled people dying of lung cancer and every one of them regretted smoking or not stopping much sooner. I have also met people suffering from lung cancer who never smoked but lived with people who did.

Unless, you are smoking yourself, being around people who are smoking while eating, is a drag. How can you enjoy an exquisite french desert while breathing cigar smoke. It diminishes the experience.
 
Old Feb 6th, 2002, 04:05 PM
  #76  
x
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r, I think Capo was referring to the question asked by [email protected]
 
Old Feb 8th, 2002, 11:48 AM
  #77  
Cristina
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OUr defense is very simple, first of all if people smoke its ONLY Americans fault since it was the Americans that introduced tobacco in Europe with the soldiers in world war 2 and have continued to publicize smoking through all the propaganda movies of the 50's and 60's. However the USA which is the most polluted nation in the world could answer the same question when someone visits your country. How can we put up with all the CO2 that you put in the atmosphere which makes you the number 1 responsible for the melting of the gliaciers and the hozon hole ?
 

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