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European Trivial Trivia!

Old Nov 18th, 2014, 11:32 AM
  #61  
 
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But it is not the only underwater crossing between two countries now is it, Pal?
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 11:39 AM
  #62  
 
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Pal.. we don't want to blow out of proportion this little harmless thread, do we..

Speaking about proportions..

When you look at models you usually find them in smaller size than the "real thing".

Q: But which model is in fact more than 150 billion times the size of the "real thing" - and a major tourist attraction in Europe?
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 11:41 AM
  #63  
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dukey - no not if the tunnel part of the Oresound bridge-tunnel crosses the frontier between Denmark and Sweden - porbably does since it is in the middle if I recall correctly having taken it a few times.
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 11:43 AM
  #64  
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Q: But which model is in fact more than 150 billion times the size of the "real thing" - and a major tourist attraction in Europe?>

Great question - Atonium outside of Brussels, extant from the 1958 World Fair - a huge atom or atoms of a molecule I guess.

Well that would be a logical guess but not sure.
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 11:51 AM
  #65  
 
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"But, the "Chunnel" is the only undersea crossing in Europe where CARS drive to on the right and leave on the left - or v.v. (after they got loaded/unloaded on the autotrains)"

They don't.

All car platforms at Folkestone and Coquelles are double-sided: which side you enter (or leave) the train is random at both terminals. You sometimes enter and leave on the left, sometimes on the right and sometimes leave on the opposite side from the one you entered

Neither terminal allows simultaneous working of both sides of the platform, so cars conform to the local driving norm immediately.

The lines don't flip flop.

Nor, BTW, is there a camp outside the Coquelles complex full of people desperate to escape the Eurozone's racism, police brutality and economic stagnation for the civilised air of an economically literate nation. Most "jungles" are actually closer to the surface ferry terminal - because most lorries use surface ferries.

Why the world's poorest and most destitute people are so determined to risk their lives to get away from France's socialist paradise I leave to the Eurofanatics to explain.

And why they don't try their luck in Germany (which has no barriers inhibiting travel from France) is also one of those great mysteries.

But they constitute the best possible argument for continuing our proud tradition of saving the Continent by having as little as possible to do with it. Worked in 1588, worked in 1815, worked in 1918 and worked in 1941.

Since we're now back to being Europe's only serious creator of new jobs, seems it's likely to work again.
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 11:53 AM
  #66  
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Why the world's poorest and most destitute people are so determined to risk their lives to get away from France's socialist paradise I leave to the Eurofanatics to explain.>

Maybe the Dole in the U K is even better - the N H S better than France's non-universal health care government plans?

Or they have communities of compartriots they can easier blend into then in France - or porbably because many of them speak more English than French.
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 11:59 AM
  #67  
 
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Well, I was not in detail reflecting the procedures at the respective points of loading/ unloading the cars.
But more the fact that the underwater tunnel connects a RHD and LHD country.

Atomium was correct, by the way.
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 12:01 PM
  #68  
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Two undersea crossovers bring flexibility of operation as trains can pass from one tunnel to the other during night maintenance periods to isolate a section of tunnel.>

OK the Tubes don't cross but there are two cross-overs mid-way in the Chunnel.
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 12:09 PM
  #69  
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New Trivial Trivia Q?

1- In France really old people often refer to local trains as "Michelines" - back in the days when they had even third class - but what was unique about Michelines for a proper train - hint is in the name Michelines.

2- Knute Rockne, legendary Notre Dame football coach, is buried in what European town?

3- Standard Gauge Railways vs Broad Gauge Railways - what three counries in western Europe (anything west of old Soviet states like Russia and Ukraine, etc) still largely have rail systems with broad-gauge rail lines - tracks being farther apart than in all other western European countries?
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 12:10 PM
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In fact, flanner raises an interesting question.
And also in fact, I have no clue.
If I was forced to take a guess or two:
For some refugees, English might still be the foreign language they can handle best.
Unlike the "rest" of the EU, the UK and the ROI do not have a system of mandatory national ID cards (same as US). Which makes it easier to stay under the radar? You can actually "prove" your residence with an utility bill...
Aside from the few hundred refugees at the Channel Tunnel, there are of course thousands who seek legal asylum in one of the mainland countries. It just does not make as many juicy headlines as the small refugee camps...
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Old Nov 18th, 2014, 01:35 PM
  #71  
 
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But that must mean you're too young to remember the New Vaudeville Band, so you couldn't haven had a tranny in 1967. What other cultural fundamentals can't you remember?

Waterloo Sunset?
A Whiter Shade of Pale?
All Along the Watchtower?>>

flanner - yes to Waterloo Sunset and Whiter shade of Pale, no to All along the Watchtower. hope that makes you feel better. and of course I had a transistor radio [tranny] to which to listen under the bedclothes - who didn't?

>

Too easy, Pal. The village with donkey transport was Clovelly which is actually in North Devon, not Cornwall, and it's the pasty that the Cornish miners exported along with their picks and shovels - but not just to Michigan, but also to Chile, Mexico, S. Africa, Australia, etc. etc.
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Old Nov 24th, 2014, 11:03 AM
  #72  
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1- In France really old people often refer to local trains as "Michelines" - back in the days when they had even third class - but what was unique about Michelines for a proper train - hint is in the name Michelines.>

Answer - these are trains that used runnber tires as wheels - much like sosme Paris metro lines - an attempt by Michelin to move into the rail wheel market - flopped of course with true high speeds. But my older French friends still refer to Michelines as cattle-car slow local trains.

2- Knute Rockne, legendary Notre Dame football coach, is buried in what European town?

Voss Norway, on the Norway in A Nutshell route and on the main train line to Bergen from Oslo.

3- Standard Gauge Railways vs Broad Gauge Railways - what three counries in western Europe (anything west of old Soviet states like Russia and Ukraine, etc) still largely have rail systems with broad-gauge rail lines - tracks being farther apart than in all other western European countries?

Portugal, Spain and Finland have the bulk of their railways wide gauge, thus preventing most trains from running un fettered between them. Spain had a Talgo train with moveable wheel bases that could travel on both wide and standard-gauge and Transfea (sp?) lifted freight cars off their bogies at the French-Spanish frontier and put them on apprpopriate gauged trains in the other country - this operating still continues. Standard-gauge tracks now penetrate Spain to Barcelona and the older AVE tracks to Madrid and Seville.

Finland has very little cross-border train travel and a bus link takes people from one system to the other in upper Finland/Spain.
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