Europe vs. USA

Sep 10th, 2007, 06:13 PM
  #21  
 
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Or not so young and have bad feet.
DCJones is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 06:38 AM
  #22  
 
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The most common answer to the what-to-wear question I have seen on this forum is "wear what you like". I have to say though, that I am one who does like to know what the local customs and dress are for places I visit, and I also like to get restaurant recommendations for places I am visiting, even sometimes for my hometown! I'm sure some of these questions seem silly, but so do many questions for which one already knows the answers. I think if one is bothered by these questions, one should just skip that thread. I think sometimes posts like these, and mean spirited answers intimidate some people from asking questions. That's a shame, because I for one, have saved alot of time and money, and had some great experiences I otherwise would not have, because of the kindness of people who take the time to answer questions. Sure many of the questions are repeats. So, if those are annoying, skip them, and maybe someone new will have the pleasure of answering a question, and knowing they helped someone new, just like they were helped when they were new. pp
(ps: I don't wear trainers anywhere except the track, and work. I tend to favor, what I think is a more attractive walking shoe!) Happy travels!!
peppermintpatti is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 07:37 AM
  #23  
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GSTeed: To me the most amazing restaurant in the USA is IHOP (International House of Pancakes) where you can be absolutely full for the entire day after just one order of breakfast! It's been a long while since I was there but it used to have Dutch, Danish/Swedish & German pancakes on their menu, nothing authentic but guaranteed you won't be hungry afterwards. Every humongous order comes with all kinds of side dishes. IHOP will give you an idea of the real american breakfast.

We do visit our local museums even if it's just to torture our kids. We usually prefer flip flops over white trainers probably because we live so close to the bay.

We rarely visit museums in Europe because they are way too expensive, we'd rather spend the euros on our meal. If we do enter a museum we usually go directly to the museum shop and thumb through the display book just to see what's inside the museum. It saves us a lot of time & money.
DAX is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 08:14 AM
  #24  
 
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As a middle-aged white Englishman, i have never really worried about what I wear, or if I am fitting in, although my wife sometimes makes comments. My American sister-in-law does not like me wearing socks, boat shoes and long trousers, but she has just been reading too many books.

I think the white tennis shoes thing is that American tennis shoes seem particularly white, and they are worn by people who are in no way athletic. White tennis shoes are a choice for only a minority in Europe.

We have never made a list of restaurants to visit, and prefer to make our own minds up by the look of the place, the style and the price. We have seldom been disappointed. We might take note of other people's recommendations, but would make up our own minds. A bad meal is something to talk about, and we have had as many disappointing meals in the United States as elsewhere in the world. Most European restaurants have their menus posted outside, so you will have a fair idea of their style and price.

I cannot imagine not visiting a museum because of the price. Perhaps because time is short, or because we have had our fill of museums, but not on the grounds of cost.

Our experience is of The United States and Canada, most of western Europe, some of central Europe, Singapore, Thailand, Australia and New Zealand.
chartley is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 08:28 AM
  #25  
 
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What restaurants?...the ones that serve food that I think is good without waiting for my Mother's approval

What do you wear? My motorcycle leathers, usually

Have you ever been to a local USA museum: Yes. My fave is the Tupperware Museum

Why do you visit them in Europe? To get away from all the tobacco smoke and diesel fumes.

Does anyone in the USA wear white trainers after Labor Day? Sure..all those European tennis stars.
Dukey is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 08:49 AM
  #26  
 
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We patronize restaurants. Unfortunately, our favorite has closed to make way for a condominium. It had been an inn in the 1700's. As we smoke, we eat on the terrace. My husband is German and he tends to make sure his clothing is neat and clean and I tend to dress up a bit because I like to.
Yes we go to museums here. Art is human expression and I like humans.
I go to European museums for the same reason.
I've been known to wear white sneakers when I'm working on the house (painting, tile work, etc.)
SuzieCII is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 01:40 PM
  #27  
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Dukey: Sorry to tell you that the Tupperware museum in Kissimee/Orlando, Florida is actually closed down. It's a tragedy because it's more thought provoking than Mickey & Minnie. I'm sure you've learned a lot about Earl Tupper who founded the company in 1938 after working at Dupont plastic and the rest.....is non biodegradable history!
DAX is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 02:50 PM
  #28  
 
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I consider myself a fairly typical American so I'll respond. I only visit museums that interest me; I have followed Van Gogh exhibitions all over the world from New York to Amsterdam as he is my favorite artist and I am passionate about his work. On the other hand, I gave la Giaconda (Mona as we Americans affectionately call her) a pass at the Louvre - the line was too long. I'll pass up museums any day for a boat ride or a day at the market or a good meal at a cafe instead. I enjoy eating and French and German are my favorites, as well as Czech and Japanese, but I'll eat anything if it's a turn on. My mother fed me overcooked meat constantly as a child, so I often avoid meat, but give me sauerbraten Munchen-style and I'll be in Heaven. I avoid chain restaurants at all costs and always seek out smaller places with wonderful food. I avoid UK food at all costs unless it is ethnic, and I often eat street food as I wander foreign streets. I travel a lot, both in the US and in Europe and when I travel I usually wear dark sports shoes (similar to sneakers or trainers) that are quite expensive but immensely comfortable and if in Europe anyone looks down on me for this, I certainly think to myself that they can kiss my ass. But, most Europeans now dress like Americans, and no one other than snobs really cares. I have seen slobs in Paris and Vienna and New York and I have seen people well-dressed and turned out in Prague and in Kentucky and in Krakow. The world has grown smaller and the old archetypes no longer apply. Most American restaurants don't require jackets for men but a button-down shirt will do. Americans like to be comfortable and dress well only in expensive places, very much like in Europe or Asia, although in China I saw shirtless men in many restaurants and was taken aback a bit by this, but who cares? Life is short: travel and eat and laugh for tomorrow may not come.
oldbuckhorn is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 03:09 PM
  #29  
 
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Well said Buchhorn..Life is way too fragile to worry about unmeaningful things.

I normally dont wear trainers unless I do some kind of physical exercise,is not because I have anything against wearing them, but the reason is that I grew up in Europe and never wore snikers as a child, unless I had P.E. at school.

Not wearing them often is for me only a cultural thing and Old habits are hard to break.
kismetchimera is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 03:32 PM
  #30  
 
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Have you ever been to a local (USA) museum? Why do you visit them in Europe?

The first part is a little patronizing, so I'll skip it.

As for visiting European museums, many of the works we've studied and admired all our lives are housed in Europe. Why wouldn't we go to see them?
JeanneB is offline  
Sep 14th, 2007, 03:11 PM
  #31  
 
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You have not seen a museum till you have visited the SPAM Museum in Minnesota. LOL

PHL2LAX is offline  
Sep 14th, 2007, 04:56 PM
  #32  
 
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Do they have a cafeteria there?
NeoPatrick is online now  
Sep 14th, 2007, 10:16 PM
  #33  
 
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What restaurants do you patronize in the USA? We don't go out to eat a lot; when we do go, we tend to eat a more high-end places, almost always French or Italian. For casual dinners, 90% of the time, it's ethnic. The other 10% of the time (with the kids), pizza or southwestern. To take a spin from (or a stab at?) another recent thread, we rarely, rarely eat at places that are billed as "American" food (except for the occasional American diner-type breakfast). That's just our food preferences. (Regional foods we like too, but there aren't any good New England seafood or New Orleans restaurants in our area.)

What do you wear to them? To the fancier restaurants, the same clothes that I wear when I eat out on vacation - skirts or dress pants, etc. To casual restaurants, well, casual clothes!

Have you ever been to a local (USA) museum? Yes. Any time we go to a city on vacation, we visit a number of the museums there (primarily art or history museums. And science museums, come to think of it.) Sheepishly, I will admit that we have not visited the museusm in our hometown very often; the collections are rather provincial, so we get our museum fixes on vacation.

Why do you visit museums in Europe? We visit museums in Europe to see what we can't see at home. While I will never pass up the Louvre and the like, I'm deciding more and more that I really enjoy the smaller museums, such as Villa Borghese, or the Marmottan.

Does anyone in the USA wear, 'white trainers' after Labor Day? Most people in the USA wear "white trainers" after Labor Day. As for me, for years, in the sneaker department, I have only owned (expensive) running shoes, and I only wear them while (guess) running. Not because I'm concerned about the looks or fashion of sneakers, but I really don't like tie-up shoes. Almost all of my other shoes are slip-ons of one sort or another.
Lexma90 is offline  
Sep 15th, 2007, 10:11 AM
  #34  
 
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If Nike Air would make their shoes in other colors, then I wouldn't be stuck wearing white year round.
suze is offline  
Sep 15th, 2007, 10:26 AM
  #35  
 
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We bin fixin to see that ther Creashun Museum in Kintucky. Aint made it yet, tho. Two bizzy eaten pork rinds an watchin Jerry Springer.

Wondern whar that there chunky gurl got er tong?
tuscanlifeedit is offline  

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