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Europe Quiz: Wednesday # 68 - Jews in Europe

Europe Quiz: Wednesday # 68 - Jews in Europe

Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:24 AM
  #21  
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I doubt anyone will get #10 without googling, here are 2 links

right arrow through about 20 slides here to the end

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Be%C5%8...on_camp_10.jpg

and more

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ar/belzec.html
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:26 AM
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excellent questions, Tom. I recused myself at the outset, mainly because most names and places had mention or large portions in any of my past three books. It pleased me to see that so many posters had correct answers. Two thumbs up to Pepper! As for #10 the only K-camp in that vicinity of any note would have to be Sobibor, on what is now the Polish-Ukrainian border, southeast of Lublin.

One entire chapter in my very latest book (a novel) is "The Fire and the Fury" which recounts the amazing escape from Sobibor, engineered by the heroic Jewish USSR Army captive, Alexander "Sasha" Pechersky. The breakout blends fiction with slightly tweaked fact.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:31 AM
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#2 is Elie Wiesel not Weisel
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:31 AM
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No quiz on Muslims yet, but I'm not necessarily trying to be unbalanced. Jewish history is just a recurring theme across Europe, a connection for me that helps me get context, although not Jewish myself.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:39 AM
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https://picasaweb.google.com/stuartt...CPXAnry1qZrIEQ


Having visited most of Europe's K-lagers, I didn't think of Belzec, although did visit. I should say that although the known extermination camps have drawn most attention over the years, a goodly number of those who died suffered from acute malnutrition, beatings and disease.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:42 AM
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And it spelled Granada, Grenada is the island in the Caribbean.

The history of the Jews in Spain is quite complex and interesting.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:44 AM
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I wasn't suggesting you were being unbalanced, but would just point out that Muslim history is also quite a recurring theme across Europe, certainly as long as Jewish history in Europe and almost as widespread, and certainly a vital part of Europe today. Maybe if there were a quiz about it people would see that if they don't already know it, or imagine the Jewish history is more prevalent.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:46 AM
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sandralist - how about a quiz on Moslems - from a historical standpoint like things in Spain to current Moslem communities, etc. - a daunting task it seems but give it a try!
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 09:51 AM
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Tower, yes, and execution trenches farther east.

Sobibor has a smaller memorial, and like Majdanek has a pile of exposed ashes. Chelmno has a quite small collection of monuments, and although right off the Berlin/Warsaw autoroute, maybe a 5 minute drive, the exit sign does not list it (I popped down on streetview and checked).

I tried to avoid being morbid in the quiz, although I have a strong interest in memorial design.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 10:11 AM
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PalenQ

I am fairly certain that if I put up a quiz no one would participate, such a horror people have of my screenname -- and I don't feel like pulling another one out of the hat.

But it is not as daunting, I don't think, as you would imagine, if you follow the typical format that these quizzes have been following -- like which city in Europe has the largest mosque, or biggest Muslim population. Or which French harbor was evacuated of Christians to become the home port of the Ottoman navy (who temporarily converted the cathedral to a mosque). Or maybe even more obvious ones from Spain, Portugal, Sicily etc. There are a great many foods and town names in Southern Europe that are Arabic-Islamic in origin.

And here's one especially for you: The flower that crashed the Dutch economy was originally imported from which Islamic country?
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 10:18 AM
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Ooh, ooh, I think I know that one. Well, googled it and not, I thought it was either Turkey or Iran.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 11:14 AM
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Yes, it was one of them! I seem to recall that the name of the flower is a corruption of the word for "turban" -- or it may be that turbans were named after the flower. I don't know.

Before somebody jumps on me for saying Muslim history in Europe is as old as Jewish history, I'll withdraw it, because the most commonly accepted history of Islam takes Mohammed as its starting point, even thought Islam lays claim to many prophets of antiquity as their own.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 11:19 AM
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5. Moscow, Rome, Spain, England (and I didn't Google it).
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 11:21 AM
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I just saw I wasn't the first to answer it.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 11:29 AM
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I didn't look up any of those answers.

What would be the point?

Pal is just jealous because I graduated from Dartmouth and not some crappy state school.

I have been to Chagall's grave in St. Paul de Vence. Have written about it here.

Everyone here knows I have been to Venice a million times. My sister lived there.

Have been to the Mezquita in Cordoba.


Pale of Settlement is mentioned in Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago.


And who doesn't know that Elie Wiesel wrote Night?

That is taught in 10th grade in every public school in Maryland.

Not everyone here is a loser.


Thin
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 11:30 AM
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Actually, Rome expelled Jews more than once. In 49 AD, they expelled both Jews and Christians, because they had gotten into a feud. At that time, Christianity was really still a sect of Judaism. Suetonius, in his History of the Twelve Caesars explains the expulsion as due to disorders instigated by a man called Crestus. It's thought that this might be a reference to Jesus, and that Suetonius thought he was still alive. However, there might have been some other Crestus in Rome at the time.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 11:32 AM
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I believe the tulips were first imported from Turkey.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 11:37 AM
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Sandralist shows a deep ignorance of Jewish and Muslim history. Considering that Islam is approximately 1,400 years old and Judaism is approximately 5,800 years old there can be little comparison.

Even today over 25% of the Nobel prizes have been won by Jews where today there is a world wide Jewish population of 14 million as opposed to approximately 1.4 billion Muslims.

The contributions of the Muslims, particularly in Spain, have been unmeasurable. The example of the 700's when Muslims, Catholics, and Jews not only lived rather harmoniously which should be a lesson for us all, they produced art, architecture, math, medicine, and science that we still either use or value today.

To question Stu Tower is laughable. I was a previewer for Stu's last book Branko. He is a meticulous and relentless researcher. And even though the book is fiction, it is founded in fact. He is criticized out of malice, not knowledge.

I write this for people other than Sandralist, because facts matter little to a proven provocateur.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 12:07 PM
  #39  
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Tulips: yes, imported from Turkey to Europe. When I first googled it, the answer came up Kazakhstan where they grow in the wild.

Everybody play nice, or the topic might be deleted.
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 12:17 PM
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turkish turbans yes for Dutch tulips - and the urban myth perhaps about the croissant - being created by Viennese bakers when the Turks, whose symbol was a crescent, had besieged Vienna - and the story goes made the croissants like a crescent to symbolize eating the hated Turks. (There are several other stories about the origins of croissants or at least their name.)
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