Eurail Travel with Mom

Old Feb 10th, 1999, 07:30 PM
  #1  
Susie
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Eurail Travel with Mom

Traveling w/80-year old mother. Our adventure will begin in Paris and then I want to buy a Eurail pass for travel to Rome and possibly Switzerland. In reading everyone's adventures, Brugge seems to be one of the most popular destinations, so maybe we should also visit that city. Having never been on the Eurail, will we see wonderful sights while riding on the train? Any and all info helpful. This has to be the best web site going. Thank you everyone for opening up a whole new world!!
 
Old Feb 11th, 1999, 02:47 AM
  #2  
Jay Frank
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My wife and I spent 3 weeks in Europe with a 21-day Europass. It was great! How many times in life can you have dinner in Venice, hop on an overnight train, and wake up the next morning in Paris?

If you have not already done so, read "Europe by Eurail" by George & LaVerne Ferguson. And, if you REALLY enjoy the planning process, get a copy of the Thomas Cook European Timetable. I spent hours playing with various itineraries.

But, unless you're a train nut, Eurail is a tool, not a goal. Give us some idea of where you want to go, and what you want to see and do. It might also help to know your European city of arrival and departure.

As for destinations ... I consider Paris a "must see" but "don't linger". Most folks disagree. Strasbourg has to be the most underrated city in Europe. It is an outstanding destination, and very convenient by rail. Switzerland is very beautiful, and few places are as special as Venice. And, yes, Brugge is great! Our itinerary was: Munich, Strasbourg & Baden-Baden, Switzerland, Venice, Paris, Brugge, Brussels, Munich. Hope your trip is as wonderful as ours!

Jay



 
Old Feb 11th, 1999, 04:23 AM
  #3  
elaine
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I will give you a piece of advice you didn't ask for: Pack light.
Getting on and off the trains with luggage is not easy, getting luggage through the stations is not easy, getting from the stations to your destination is not easy. Even boarding the train and putting your luggage in the luggage bin or overhead shelf is more difficult than it sounds. However active and healthy your mother is, you will probably be responsible for handling the luggage, so please plan for it, and take less than you want to.
 
Old Feb 19th, 1999, 10:02 AM
  #4  
JOAN
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SUSIE...BRING A REGULAR-PILLOW FOR MOM.
SQUISH IT INTO A CARRY-ON...MY 84YR.OLD
MOTHER NAPPED VERY COMFORTABLY ON THE
TRAINS AND LOVED IT ALL THE MORE ON THE
RETURN FLIGHT HOME.
IF MOM TAKES MEDS,HAVE DOCTOR WRITE
ADDITIONAL SCRIPT REPLACEMENT.
BOTTLED WATER AND PACKAGED CRACKERS COME
IN HANDY.

 
Old Feb 19th, 1999, 11:31 PM
  #5  
Ben Haines
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I'm not sure that a railpass will turn out cheaper if you're covering only Paris, Rome, Switzerland, perhaps Brugge, and Paris. You'll find basic second class fares unmder "point2point" on http://www.railpass.com. They are also in the January issue of the Thomas Cook European Timetable. Paris to Rome 118 US dollars, Rome to Milan 31 dollars, Milan to Basel 65 dollars, Basel to Brussels 67 dollars, Brussels to Brugge 9 dollars, Brugge to Lille 9 dollars, Lille to Paris 30 dollars, total basic price 329 dollars. Add fast train supplements of ten dollars each for Italy, Switzerland, and Basel to Brugge (3x10=30) total with supplements 359 dollars.

Then whether you've a card or a supplement, Paris to Rome by day is a very long trip: Paris 0812, Milan change trains 1450 to 1515, Rome 2050. Especially with an elderly traveller I'd use a 2-berth second class sleeper cabin at a supplement of 50 dollars a head on the Palatino night express, Paris 1933, Rome 1055. If you find that this goes well you might also think of a sleeper from Switzerland to Brussels South station, where you arrive at 0645, change to the train at 0708, and arrive in Brugge at 0803. You can book this sleeper in any main railway station in Europe.

If you do decide to use night trains, I can e-mail you a note I have on disc on night trains in Europe.

May I gently disagree with Joan ? Unless you're saving every penny, there is bottled water on all trains, and the various national buffet cars and sleeping cars offers various national forms of crackers and cookies, more interesting than what you bring with you. On the other hand, I do recommend that for the Palatino Express you buy bread, butter, meats, pates, cheese, fruit, wine, and a corkscrew, and eat siupper in your cabin. The train has a restaurant car, but with no choice of meals, and to reachj it your mother walks down a corridor on a swaying train.

Please write if I can help further.

Ben Haines, London

 

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