Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Elmo in Paris: The Parisian Adventures of Two Parents, One Toddler and One Red Monster

Elmo in Paris: The Parisian Adventures of Two Parents, One Toddler and One Red Monster

Old Dec 2nd, 2008, 05:00 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,834
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I'm enjoying this post. We have taken our sons to Europe several times, but they were past the toddler stage. Tell us more...
padams421 is offline  
Old Dec 2nd, 2008, 06:23 PM
  #22  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 764
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Day 4
Today was our fifth wedding anniversary and again we hoped to do something a bit different. A few trips to London ago, we bought the book “One Hour From Paris” by Annabelle Sims. She was living in Paris without a car when she wrote the book and, as the title says, it is filled with day trips all within 1 hour of Paris and accessible by public transportation, mostly the local train (RER). I don't see the book on amazon so maybe it is out of print. If we had more time we would have done a few more of the trips because they look really interesting and not touristy.

We decided to go to a Bal Musette, My mother and I had just finished reading Susan Vreeland's entertaining “Luncheon of the Boating Party” and this piqued our interest in a guignette. We took the RER train from near Les Halles to Champigny – about 25 minutes. LP loved the choo choo so at least the commute was a hit! When we arrived at the restaurant, it was about one quarter filled, mostly with big groups of extended family or friends. Within about an hour the entire place filled up and the music started. We had a blast. So many people were dancing (to what I guessed was traditional french music) that the dance floor was filled and people just danced around the tables or outside. I actually thought it was pretty funny that the people took the dancing so seriously (some of it was like line dancing) that they pushed some kids off the dance floor to make room for the serious dancers. LP loved dancing with her Dada and they looked pretty cute too! The restaurant had a lovely outside area with tables and a small swing set. The food was fine, nothing special but we had lots of good wine. At one point I noticed people pointing at LP and I looked over and she had picked up an entire chicken breast and was waving it to the beat of the music. We stayed for a few hours and then walked back to the train and headed back to Paris.

As an aside, among the families and others at the bal musette there was a table of older, quite large, ladies who on closer inspection appeared to be cross-dressers. I pointed this out to my mother. When I came home from Paris and was talking to my father he said, “So I heard you took mom to a gay bar.” Guess something got lost in the translation there.

When we arrived back in Paris, we were all a bit sleepy from the wine but since we were right nearby, and it was Sunday, we decided to walk around the Marais a bit. It was absolutely mobbed and a real pain to push the stroller on the narrow sidewalks. LP had fallen asleep so we sat in the beautiful Place des Vosges for a while before making our way back to the apartment. We walked most of the way but then were all pretty tired so just took a cab for the last bit.

Since we had a babysitter and it was our anniversary, my husband and I were determined to go out for dinner even though neither of us was the least bit hungry. We had walked by Brasserie Balzac the day before and thought it looked interesting and Pudlo gave it his blessing (sort of) so we tried it. We were seated in the tiniest table in the corner but it was the only open table so we were glad to take it. I ordered mussels and being born and bred in New England, I consider myself proficient with seafood. However, as I was was eating my mussels, the waiter came rushing over to tell me that I should be using an empty mussel shell to pull out the meat from the mussels I am eating (not the little fork he gave me). My husband and I were skeptical, no one else in the restaurant was eating mussels so I couldn't see what they were doing (and why did he give me the little fork anyway?). We half wondered whether our waiter had made a bet with the other waiters that he could get me to do this but I did it anyway. As a side note, when I was in NY last week I saw some French people eating mussels that way. Another side note, I reread Adam Gopnik's “Paris to the Moon” when we got home and there is a whole section on the Brasserie Balzac. I guess we missed it in its glory days before it was bought out by a chain of brasseries but we were seated next to two different specimens of Parisian intellectuals – one an older man with flowing long hair in a perfectly tailored suit and the other with a shaved head and wire rimmed glasses carrying a copy of Philip Roth's newest book.
Sally30 is offline  
Old Dec 2nd, 2008, 06:54 PM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 175
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I am loving your report! You have shamed me into finally writing up one on our trip to Maine in October with our 4 month old...I kept telling myself "no one wants to read the boring exploits with a baby." But you have proven it is all in the telling!

I also love the tips on what you took with you. I have been meaning to make a post in the Lounge about "Tips on traveling with a baby/toddler" as I couldn't find anything like that when we were planning. I am hoping you will look out for it and chime in.

Thank you!
als0107 is offline  
Old Dec 2nd, 2008, 07:15 PM
  #24  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,834
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Great information here, thank you. Your daughter wasn't La Gigante from an Italy trip report, was she?
Leely2 is offline  
Old Dec 3rd, 2008, 06:21 AM
  #25  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 764
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Leely2 - yup! that was here. She is still a big kid (despite the new codename). She isn't even two yet and I had to buy 4yr old clothes for her!

Als0107 - I would love to hear about your Maine trip. If you look on the Europe board and search under "baby" or "toddler" there are lots of helpful posts about traveling with a kid.
Sally30 is offline  
Old Dec 3rd, 2008, 12:17 PM
  #26  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 764
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
DAY 5

The day started innocently enough. We said goodbye to my mother in the morning (I was sad to see her leave) and then went for a walk in St. Germain des Pres. LP was a bit crabby. I think the last few days were catching up with her. Decided to grab a quick lunch and eat outside. We happen to be near Gerard Mulot so we peeked in and saw some sandwiches that looked good. I decided to get olive pizza, and mindful of the price, ordered a medium size piece to share with LP. When the clerk gave it to me with my receipt I saw it was 15E! Good thing the euro was falling every day that we were there. Sorry to digress, it was a very strange week to be gallivanting around Europe. All the headlines of the newspapers were along the lines of “France Economy Ruined, Americans Fault” or “Stupid Americans and their Debt Have Destroyed Europe.” We weren't going to solve the financial crisis so I saw no reason to let it ruin our trip (and who knows when we'd be back on another big trip).

We headed back to the apartment after lunch to give LP a nap. After about an hour she would not fall asleep (and was enjoying her queen size bed as a trampoline) so I decided to take her for a walk in the stroller in the hope that she would nod off. I made the mistake of heading into the Luxembourg Gardens which she immediately recognized as duck paradise and was wide awake. I let her walk for a while then put her back in the stroller. Bad move. She did not want to be in that stroller and started screaming. She does that sometimes and stops crying after a couple of minutes so I pressed on. No relief, so I sat down momentarily to take a break. I was so distracted by her screaming that I wasn't paying attention and realized I had sat down next to a homeless guy. LP continued to scream. Hed got up and left. The screaming continued. I checked for emergencies, sickness, etc.; no problems, she just did not want to nap or sit in her stroller. At this point I was too tired to carry her around like I had been doing for the past few days during other “difficult” times. It was still lunch time and people seemed to be in the park on their lunch break trying to enjoy some peace and quiet so I headed out of the park to walk along the street where I hoped the car noises would drown her out. Apparently not. Everyone I passed was staring at me – not the sympathetic “I remember those days. My kids are now in college” looks that I get at home nor the “Thank goodness I never had kids and bought a Porsche instead” looks. But rather people were staring at me in alarm as if they had never heard a child cry and wondered what was in the strange basket on wheels that I was pushing.

I gave up the battle and picked her up. Crying ceased immediately. I remembered that the nearby Rue Vauvin had lots of kids stores. I wanted to look for some clothes for her and figured they would be used to children there. We made an initial stop at a gelato store and LP was all smiles and even sat back in her stroller. After poking in a few shops we headed back into the Luxembourg Garden. At this point I was exhausted and had given up on both the nap and keeping her in the stroller. I let her run wild, covered in chocolate and dried tears. She seemed happy and barring a few close calls with tricycles, she was fine. We met up with my husband and, of course, as he arrived she fell fast asleep in her stroller. We poked around the 6e for a little while longer and decided to get a quick dinner and call it a night. We ate at a pizza cafe in the Place Sorbonne. The pizza was nothing special but it was very pleasant to sit outside and there was a lively pre-dinner cocktail crowd. LP ate her pizza and was completely enamored by the accordion player, who must have spotted us suckers a mile away, and sidled up to our table to give a performance.

We returned to the apartment and after lying next to LP for at least a couple of hours trying to coax her to sleep, I fell asleep myself and ended what was not a great day. Nothing particularly Paris related here but I guess it shows that not every day of vacation is perfect and you can still have a great trip.
Sally30 is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 05:13 AM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 361
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Don't worry Sally30! I would have looked at you sympathetically!

(Side note: While I was waiting the other day to get my oil changed, my daughter began lifting up her shirt and showing her belly button to total strangers. They were not amused.)

Still loving your trip report.
siena1 is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 05:23 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 22,702
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
Why on earth wouldn't they be amused? Does she have a hideous belly button?
kerouac is online now  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 09:23 AM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 361
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
She has an adorable belly button!

Most of the other customers were working on their laptops or making phone calls. Guess they weren't in the mood for mid-day entertainment.
siena1 is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 09:50 AM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 89
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This is awesome! My husband and I are finalizing details for a home exchange for the whole month of February, we have a son who will be 23 months when we go and I was started to get a wee bit nervous, but your posts are giving me new found confidence that our adventure will be great!
JenG is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 09:53 AM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 89
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
You are having me second guessing taking our car seat. Is it possible to find a taxi company once we get there that has a car seat for the ride to the airport? Also, if we were to go take trains to other cities do you know how this works? Would I just use that harness?
JenG is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 02:43 PM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 26,214
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Don't worry Sally30! I would have looked at you sympathetically!

so would I (even though my kids ARE beyond college age), but I would have my hands over my ears while looking at you sympathetically
sf7307 is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 05:28 PM
  #33  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,834
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Still enjoying La Gigante Goes to France--it's as entertaining as your Rome report.
Leely2 is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 05:46 PM
  #34  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 764
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks!

No worries on the ear comment. I was wishing I had my ipod.

JenG - a whole month sounds great. If you aren't going to be using a car, I'd just book a shuttle service from the airport that has a carseat and bring the harness for the train. I got some names of shuttle services for Paris from this board and when I looked on the websites some mentioned having carseats so I'm sure if you call the services they can tell you. I don't think you could use a carseat on a train unless the train has seatbelts. What would you connect the seat to otherwise? Not sure you could use a harness on a train. I've never used one so maybe someone else who has one could tell you.

The trip continues....
DAY 6

We woke up around 8:30 and were out by 10. Before we left for the trip my husband and I had talked about how we were going to get up early each day and be out of the apartment by 8am, return at noon so LP could nap and go out again in the afternoon. Never happened. I cannot explain why I thought a group of non-morning people including a jet lagged toddler, would ever be able to get up, dressed and fed that early. This frustrated me for the first 9 days and on the last day I made peace with the fact that we would not leave our apartment before 10am. Lesson learned: don't be an idiot!

Anyway, some time during the night the difficult toddler that had joined us yesterday was removed and our easy going, happy daughter returned to us. We had a leisurely walk to the Musee D'Orsay and my nerves had recovered from the previous day. When we reached the entrance of the museum though we were dismayed to see an absolutely huge line. I then remembered that Tuesday (today) was the day not to go the Musee D'Orsay as it is the day the Louvre was closed. We decided to get in line and discuss whether we should stay or not. We were probably in line for about two minutes when a guard came up to us and whisked us through a special “family” entrance and a minute later we had our tickets and were in the museum.

Throughout our stay we were extremely impressed at how child-friendly Paris is. Most of the museums have special lines for families and elevators for strollers or the disabled. The Louvre was incredible. One of the wings has several steps between each small room and there was an self-operated elevator in every single room. Throughout Paris there were tons of well maintained playgrounds as well as puppet theaters, carousels and other fun things for kids. I found changing tables/rooms in most public places. We loved going to Rome last year and the Italians absolutely go nuts for babies (probably because there are so few there) but there are very few practical facilities for children. Paris, on the other hand, was extremely well equipped.

There were tons of people inside the Musee D'Orsay but it is large enough of a museum that you could still enjoy it with a crowd. Using a stroller was fine too. Lots of people were taking photos of the paintings (just the paintings, not themselves with the paintings) which I don't understand since you can buy a professionally photographed postcard in the gift shop. We started on the top floor with the Impressionists and worked our way down. I can't figure out why all the most popular works are in a remote top corner of the museum and the least popular work is on spacious and convenient ground floor. LP was enjoying herself, pointing out different things in the paintings and having a good time. We ate in the cafe in the museum and looked briefly at the Art Nouveau rooms. I could see LP needed a nap. She had done well – we were there for at least a couple of hours - so I told my husband that I'd take her outside and walk her around in the stroller while she slept. We planned to meet up in half an hour.

LP fell asleep as soon as we got outside and I was walking along the river when I overheard an American couple saying “We should really go inside and bring it to the lost and found.” I could see they were holding one of those phony gold rings. I felt bad for them and didn't want them to waste their vacation time so as I was walking by I told them that it was a fake ring and a scam and to just leave the ring on the sidewalk. They seemed surprised but thanked me and took my advice. I continued to walk a few feet when I saw the woman who was pulling the con giving me the dirtiest look. When she caught my eye she started screaming at me, “Merde!” “Puttana!” (Impressive, she speaks Italian too) and some other words I hadn't learned in my French claseses. It didn't really bother me. I was more concerned about this crazy lady waking LP up. I walked onto the bridge toward the Louvre and realized that the scam woman must have signaled ahead to her friends (or they saw the whole thing) as suddenly two women started to approach me from the other direction. It was the middle of the day and the bridge was filled with tourists, so, I suppose, intellectually I realized that nothing bad would happen but I did start to panic. Her colleagues also started yelling and gesturing at me. I became uncomfortably aware that I was alone, weighed down by a stroller laden with bags, wearing jewelry and my hands were full. So, yes, I freaked out a bit and started walking really, really fast. I walked all the way to the Louvre and the Tuilleries in a few minutes. While I was imaging that the rest of the ring scam team had been called ahead, was setting up a trap for me and planning to sell my organs on the black market, I heard a woman right next to me saying “Excuse me, Museo De Orsee?”. I pointed out the huge building covered in banners across the river and she practically hugged me she was so grateful that I spoke English. She seemed surprised that I was a tourist and said she figured I was a local because I was with a baby. So there you go – the answer to the famous fodors travel wardrobe question – to look like a local, accessorize with a baby. I still needed to get back to meet my husband so I was sure not to walk the way I came and planted myself in front of a security guard while I waited for my husband. He thought my run in was hysterical and we headed off.

With my bodyguard in tow, we walked back across the bridge (my husband kept pointing to women saying - “Is that them?”) and through the Place de la Concorde. For reasons I can't explain, neither of us looked to the left where we would have seen the Arch de Triomphe. We realized this a couple of days later when we were looking at the Arch from a different angle. We were on our way to Parc Monceau. We walked up along the Blvd Malsherbes – not too exciting – and got some pastries before we entered the park. We must have hit the park right at the end of the school day because it was teaming with kids. We enjoyed the carousel (Butte Chaumont was definitely the best carousel), sandbox and playground and, after resting on a bench for a while, headed back to our neighborhood.

Each morning I'd been getting pastries at a boulangerie on the Rue St. Jacques behind our apartment (staying in an apartment that you've stocked with really good food is not good for your diet) and had noticed a lot of good looking cafes and stores on that part of the street. We went back to that area and had a drink outside at a cafe before picking up some prepared food for dinner. We were dreading the task of getting LP to sleep after the previous night. But I lay down next to her and within 10 minutes were both fast asleep. When I woke up again I slipped out of her room and she was asleep until the morning.

Sally30 is offline  
Old Dec 4th, 2008, 09:12 PM
  #35  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 101
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
What is the gold ring scam??? Your trip report is so interesting!
Debbiekep2 is offline  
Old Dec 5th, 2008, 09:00 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 7,142
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
15€ for a slice of pizza?! Yikes!
bardo1 is offline  
Old Dec 5th, 2008, 09:15 AM
  #37  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 34,195
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
That's what happens when you buy pizza at one of the most expensive shops and in one of the most expensive neighborhoods in Paris.

Interesting report with good details for kids. The Musee d'Orsay layout isn't arbitrary. For example, I think most museums put sculpture on the ground floor for logistical reasons. And the upper floor has skylights so the lighting is different.

Christina is online now  
Old Dec 7th, 2008, 09:50 AM
  #38  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 764
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Day 7

I woke up to the sound of people talking and opened my eyes to see a man directly over my head fixing the skylight. At the same moment I noticed, for the first time, the shade that we should have been closing on the skylight. That got us up quickly! LP was still sleeping and it looked like it would rain so we decided to put our plans to go to Versailles on hold. We were all a bit tired by this point in the trip so we decided to have a leisurely morning and then head back to the Louvre.

More good pastries for breakfast - LP and I were now hooked on the pain au chocolat while my husband found a delicious chocolate almond combination from the coffee shop downstairs. We made our way out of the building after getting yelled at for leaving our stroller in the lobby by the woman who seems to be the super of the building. Of course there had been three others there (lots of kids in this building) when we left ours and all had disappeared since. I wondered if the other tenants disliked the parade of strangers renting the rooftop apartment.

We walked through the lovely 6e and 7e poking in shops along the way. I regret not buying more clothing for myself. I always think I can buy the same things at home but never do. The children's clothing in Paris is beautiful but, for the most part in the stores in the nice neighborhoods of central Paris, are not the kind of stuff you'd let your daughter wear to the playground. We got a couple of “special” outfits that I am hoping actually fit when we have somewhere to wear them. I was really enjoying just looking around and relaxing. LP was happily eating a second pain au chocolat in her stroller, face covered in chocolate as she discovered how to dig right into the chocolate filling in the middle. We decided to pick up some sandwiches before we went into the Louvre and stumbled on a great patisserie on the Rue de Saint Peres (on the block with a big school on the right as you head toward the Seine - maybe the Sciences Po) when we saw a huge line of students out front. The sandwiches were good but the pistachio and chocolate eclairs were delicious.

We were again pulled out of line at the Louvre and allowed to go right in (although we really just skipped security and still had to wait in the ticket line). After standing in the ticket line we realized that there was a machine to buy tickets which we should have used. No one else seemed to see it either. There were lots and lots of families with kids and strollers in the Louvre and, as I mentioned in one of the earlier postings, it is a very child friendly and wheelchair friendly place. An added bonus for kids is that it is big and noisy and most rooms are large enough that people can spread out so I felt fine letting LP walk around without fear of her getting trampled. She was good again, happy in her stroller or walking around, and we spent most of our time looking at the Watteaus and other French art in the Sully wing.

It rained while were in museum but had cleared up so we walked back to the Luxembourg Gardens for the puppet show. All the kids sit up front (so they can see) and we were a little late (the time in my guidebook was off by 1/2hr) so the only place for LP was in the middle of a row. She squeezed in between kids she didn't know, in a dark (the lights are dimmed) strange place, watching a show in a foreign language. I was wondering if this would be a disaster but after a few glances back to make sure we hadn't left, she seemed to forget about us and watch the Three Little Pigs. I don't know if she had any idea what was going on but seemed engaged. I love the old fashioned puppets and love that the pigs wear scarves. I read that the puppet theater has been in the same family for two generations and you can see that the owners really take pride in the show. After all, they aren't playing to the most discerning audience.

After the puppet show we spent some more time in the park and played in the leaves. I could really get used to this lifestyle – take your kid to the playground in a beautiful park where you can get a coffee (I loved that for some reason), then do some window shopping and stop at the fromagerie and chacouterie for dinner supplies on the way home – sure beats standing on the subway, rushing home from work to make dinner each night. It was fun to see how the French kids dress - a lot of the same gear as American kids but with that certain French sense of style - all the kids wear scarves with their coats and most kids seemed to be wearing nice leather shoes rather than sneakers. But, like the pizza comment above, maybe that was because we were in a fancy part of town.

We contemplated getting an early dinner out but since LP hadn't napped today we decided to eat in the apartment and put her to bed early. We walked back to the Rue St. Jacques, via a different route. Overwhelmed by the chacouterie, cheese shops and other tasty things, we bought enough food for about 8 hungry adults. Particularly good was a patisserie called “Bon” and their opera and some sort of chocolate covered merengue (another Pudlo recommendation although I could have figured that one out myself). I am embarrassed to admit that we ate most of what we bought. Good thing we were walking so much and I was carrying a 30 pound load (LP) for large parts of the day. While my husband was eating his pate, LP grabbed a big chunk off his plate, ate it and asked for more. Stuffed to the gills, LP fell right to sleep and we read for a while before going to sleep.

In case anyone is looking for a good book (partially) set in Paris, I really enjoyed reading The Bad Girl by Mario Vargas Llosa before we left. Also enjoyed “Ladies Paradise” about Le Bon Marche by Zola.
Sally30 is offline  
Old Dec 13th, 2008, 05:41 PM
  #39  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 764
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Day 8

That morning my husband and I had that sad revelation that the trip was winding down so, for once, we got an early start and went to the Decorative Arts Museum at the Louvre. It was fantastic. I couldn't believe I'd never gone there before. I really could have stayed there all day there was so much to see. Although, it was probably the world's worst place to bring a toddler as everything is on floor level, mostly not behind glass, glimmering and enticing for little hands. I carried her pretty much through the whole museum – I wasn't taking any changes- but LP was well behaved and seemed quite interested in all the objects. After a couple of hours she was done and we decided to leave. We didn't make it to the bookshop or the special exhibit which looked like all red items. The fashion section was closed as the Valentino exhibit had just closed. Hopefully it will come to NY and we can see it there.

I was determined to have a leisurely lunch today. So many things to eat and so little time left! We crossed the river back to the Rue du Bac where we had spotted some good casual places on the way to the museum. It was getting a little late for lunch so we popped into the place we thought looked best (no english menu, filled with French people). When we walked in the waiter took one look at us and told us they were completely full. I'm not sure I believed that was true. We left and continued up the street. The Bar Bac, a block towards the river, seemed to have some tables but I was dismayed by the multi-lingual menus in the window. It turned out to be great. The waiters were all very friendly, the food was good and it was not filled with tourists (of course there were some). I started with onion soup – the weather had turned chilly, but still sunny, by this stage – and LP was fascinated, grabbed my enormous spoon and dug right in. The women next to us laughed and LP waved and smiled at everyone for the remainder of the meal. I had a very tasty omelet, I forgot what my husband had, and we had a pear tart for dessert. And a lot of wine. Since LP was having fun, we relaxed, drank a lot and ended up talking to the couple next to us. We discovered that they live in Boston too, when they are not in their flat in Paris or their French country home. I tried not to be too jealous at their lifestyle! I was very content to have my relaxing lunch and once we headed outside, LP fell right asleep in her stroller.

Since we were in no shape for anything too serious at that stage, we decided to do some shopping and headed to Le Bon Marche. I was a bit disappointed. The men's stuff was very uninteresting. All the same clothes as a good department store in the US. I liked some of the women's clothes (it took me a while to figure out that there are two connected buildings and that the departments I was interested in were in the far building) but everything I liked was super expensive. I didn't see the store brand, fashionable but reasonably priced pieces that I always find in Galleries Lafayette. Maybe I was looking in the wrong place. We spent about an hour there and then headed back to the Luxembourg Gardens. LP was in the sandbox when a little boy of about 5 (dressed in jeans with a big “Dior” label) walked up to LP shoved her out of the blue. I thought she was going to fall over or cry and need rescuing but she just looked at him, turned around, and walked away unfazed. Good girl! We heard a whistle blowing and the guards were rounding everyone up to leave the park. It struck me funny that they are so strict about getting everyone to leave.

We were now on the look out for a restaurant for dinner. We weren't sure a second long restaurant meal with LP would be the best idea but we were getting to the end of the trip and wanted to try some more places. My husband was tired and would have been happy going back to the apartment but was being a good sport because he could see I wanted to go out. We went to a place recommended in Pudlo right near our apartment (I forget the name). The restaurant was pretty empty, it was about 7, but we sat down and ordered some wine. LP started to fuss, and my restaurant bag of tricks (table topper, box of raisins, stickers) had been wiped out from our lunch. When she started to smash her banana into the tablecloth, we decided to cut our losses and leave. We had had a nice day, we didn't want to spoil it. I was quite proud to explain to the waiter in French (even using the subjective) why “it was necessary” that we had to leave. As if he couldn't tell! We got some more treats at Bon and a crepe at the place outside our apartment and all went to sleep early.
Sally30 is offline  
Old Dec 14th, 2008, 05:17 AM
  #40  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 361
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Still enjoying the trip report!

My daughter is about the same age as yours. How do you get her to behave in the museums? (My little one is not a big fan of being carried. She wants to walk on her own, which isn't really an option in most museums.)
siena1 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:31 AM.