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Driving help to/from Granada, Marbella, Ronda, & Seville

Driving help to/from Granada, Marbella, Ronda, & Seville

May 7th, 2001, 05:13 AM
  #1  
Kathy
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Driving help to/from Granada, Marbella, Ronda, & Seville

We are renting a car for the first part of our honeymoon. If anyone has helpful suggestions/directions of what to do or not to do regarding the following journeys, I'd love to know.

1. Granada to Marbella (staying at Puente Romano).

2. Marbella to Ronda (staying at Reina Victoria).

3. Ronda to Seville. Is it better to drive to the airport, drop the car there and take a taxi into Seville or should we attempt to drive into Seville? This I think may be the trickiest.

Any help on any of these would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Kathy
 
May 7th, 2001, 05:25 AM
  #2  
Ursula
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Kathy: In Marbella, don't miss the old part of the city. It is just gorgeous. Have a drink at the little main square Plaza de los Naranjos (sp?).
Do not go to dinner earlier than 9 p.m. Locals even eat much later. Night life starts very late.
Don't miss either the yacht port Puerto Banus for a drink in the evening. The yachts are just stunning.
 
May 7th, 2001, 05:45 AM
  #3  
Kathy
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Oops, I guess I wasn't that clear in my question. I'm specifically looking for driving suggestions as far as directions and driving tips. (Thanks for your other suggestions though Ursula).
 
May 8th, 2001, 09:45 AM
  #4  
jane
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I would say leave your car at the airport in Seville. Maybe someone else has a better suggestion, but that seems like a good idea
 
May 8th, 2001, 10:16 AM
  #5  
steve
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If you don't need the car in Sevilla, definitely get rid of it. You can drop it at the airport, or if you specify it beforehand, you can drop it off at the train station near the center of the city.

The drive to the airport, not during rush hour is about 30 minutes. The airport is small and easy to navigate.

If you want more info on traveling in Andalucia, check out my web page describing our recent trip -
http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/57...andalucia.html

 
May 8th, 2001, 02:56 PM
  #6  
Maribel
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Kathy,
From Granada to Marbella the most scenic route, the one we always take, would be down the N323/E902 (parts will be under construction, as they're making it a straighter 4 lane route thru the mountains-a laborious process) past the Suspiro del Moro mountain pass ( beautiful vistas) to Motril, then pick up the scenic coastal route N340 (pretty drive) past Nerja (nice photo op stop) to Malaga, then pick up the superhighway E15 at Malaga (please DON'T take the old and congested coastal road that takes you through Torremolinos/Fuengirola/Benalmadena!), and the E 15 will take you pleasantly above the suburban sprawl on the coast itself and speed you down to Marbella in no time.
From Marbella you should continue on the E 15 superhighway to exit 172, which will be at San Pedro de Alcantara, then head up the very safe, well maintained and wide but serpentine A 376 straight into Ronda-and wow, what views!-drove this myself last June with absolutely no problems and took a little over an hr.
As from ditching the rental car in Seville, we did turn our car in at Santa Justa rail station; however, reaching the station, coming in from the autopista from Jerez, then going round and round Seville on the beltway was tedious and time consuming at rush hr. Santa Justa was quite congested when we arrived. There was no one outside at the Avis parking lot indicating where exactly we should leave the car, so we just guesed and dragged our bags inside. Once inside the terminal, however, the agent at the Avis counter just took our keys and asked no questions, nor did he inspect the car. The hassle was fighting the heavy traffic to reach Santa Justa station, then snaking our way to the car rental parking lots. Friends who had dropped off their car at the Seville airport said that the drop off was an absolute snap, much easier, because the Avis counter is apparently very near the entrance, and is an easy walk with luggage. They strongly suggested that we drop off at the airport next time, and we've decided to follow their advice, because we just hate driving in the city of Seville at any time. And as Steve has told you, the airport is quite small, and taxi fares from the airport to the center are not expensive. Well worth the money to avoid the hassle, for us, at least.
Hope this helps and have a wonderful honeymoon!\
Maribel
 
May 8th, 2001, 03:09 PM
  #7  
celeste
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Or, if you're renting from Hertz, you can drop it off the Luis Mantoto Branch. It's very easy to find and outside of congested area.
 
May 9th, 2001, 07:18 AM
  #8  
Kathy
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Celeste,

We actually are renting from Hertz. If it's easy, we may drop it off at the Luis Mantoto branch. Where is that? If that is easier we might do that, otherwise, we'll probably do the airport drop-off.

Maribel,

Thanks again for your directions. I feel much more confident going knowing a little more about what I will be up against. 3 more days till the wedding - ahhh, and I'm finalizing all the plans.

Thanks for all your help.

Kathy
 
May 9th, 2001, 09:52 AM
  #9  
Maribel
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Kathy,
I believe the Luis Montonto location for Hertz is on the eastern side of Seville, before you hit the Avenida Menendez Pelayo and before entering the maze of the Santa Cruz quarter. Is that true, Celeste? If you were to come into Seville on the A92/N334 from the direction of Antequera, you would pass it. I'm assuming you'll be heading up to Seville from Ronda through Arcos. If you want to drop the car off at the Luis Maroto location or even at the Hertz desk at the airport, then before heading in to the city from the southern Jerez-Seville autopista (toll road), you could take the beltway
around to the east side and avoid getting stuck in center city traffic, then access either of the two Hertz locations from the eastern side of the city. The airport is also located on the eastern side, accessible from the beltway.
I'm hoping our resident Seville Fodorite, Pedro, will see this and explain which location is easier and quicker to reach when coming in from the south. I'd still avoid the Hertz location at Santa Justa train station.
 
May 9th, 2001, 10:18 AM
  #10  
mary lewis
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A couple of comments about dropping a car off at the airport in Seville. We did this in March - we booked through Avis and got great pickup service in Cordoba but horrible drop-off service in Seville - just a word of warning. Also in March there was a taxi strike going on at the airport so once we dropped the car off we had to figure out how the heck we were going to get into town. There was a bus but we couldn't figure out its exact route but got on anyway figuring it was our only option. It dropped off at a big hotel and I could see a taxi stand there so we got off there and hired a taxi to our hotel - bottom line - if you are thinking about dropping off at Seville airport - check on the status of the taxi strike.
 
May 9th, 2001, 12:36 PM
  #11  
celeste
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You're direction is right, Maribel. Re taxi strike, you might want to arrange pick-up by your hotel. I did exactly that and for 3 people, the hotel charge me 2,400 pts. (much less than taking a taxi). They actually waited for us because Iberia Airlines (from Madrid) was late by 1 1/2 hrs. (of course) and they helped us interpret because Iberia lost one of our luggage (what else is new). They found the luggage after 2 days and had it delivered to our hotel (our hotel followed up with them 2x a day). Iberia is really bad.
 
May 9th, 2001, 03:15 PM
  #12  
Maribel
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Kathy,
With my trusty (I hope) Seville Michelin map in hand, I see an easy (I also hope) way of reaching the Hertz location at Luis Maroto from the south (Ronda). If you come up from Jerez on the autopista (toll road) A4 (also called NIV and E5 as you approach Seville), just take the SE 30 beltway to the right/east and take this to exit 3, where you'll go left/west onto Avenida de Andalucia which will become Luis Montoto as you approach the city. On my Michelin map this looks fairly simple, but in reality...? It looks quicker than going further on out on the SE 30 to the exit (right/east) for the Avenida del Aeropuerto San Pablo since you're renting through Hertz.
I should always post with a map in hand!
 
May 9th, 2001, 03:31 PM
  #13  
Maribel
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With my trusty (I hope) Seville Michelin map in front of me, I see a fairly easy, quick way (I also hope) to reach the Hertz location at Luis Montoto from the south (Ronda). As you approach Seville on the autopista (toll road) A 4 from Cadiz/Jerez (also called the NIV and E5 as you get near the city), just head right/west on the SE 30 beltway and take the beltway to exit 3, where you'll go left/west on Avenida de Andalucia, which will become Luis Montoto as you approach the city center. This looks easier, quicker than continuing on the SE 30 beltway all the way to the Avenida del Aeropuerto San Pablo, where you'd pick up the airport road.
Since you're renting from Hertz, this looks like a good option and quite simple, but in reality...?
I should always remember to post with map in hand!
 
May 10th, 2001, 04:49 AM
  #14  
Kathy
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Maribel,

Thank so much. I'm hoping that with our two maps (from the Spanish Tourish Board & AAA) we won't need the Michelin one. What do you think? In anycase which road do we take from Ronda to the A4? The 376 to the 382? or is the smaller a372 a prettier and not too difficult trip? We are really lookin forward to our stay in Seville and will pass along your regards.
 
May 10th, 2001, 05:35 AM
  #15  
celeste
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Kathy, we had this same situation before we left for Spain. We had same maps as yours + a freebie from a travel book. When we arrived in Spain and checked the Michelin, it was more detailed than in US and more current also (as you notice one road is called by another # in another map, right Maribel?) So, for about $6.75, I'll strongly advise you to buy (in Spain) the Michelin.
 
May 10th, 2001, 01:18 PM
  #16  
Maribel
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Hi Kathy and Celeste,
I'd really urge anyone traveling in southern Spain to purchase the Michelin map #446 for Andalucia/Costa del Sol. It's the most detailed one around (yep, more detailed than AAA) and extremely helpful, because the signage in the south can be very poor, vexingly so. We just never travel in Spain without our Michelin regional maps; they're invaluable and have saved us countless hrs of frustration. You can buy the newest one in any bookstore upon arrival in Madrid, or if you'd rather study it before you go, you could pay a few $ more and purchase it at B&N or Borders. I just purchased one for our trip to the Pays Basque (the Michelin Aquitaine) through Franklin Maps (610 265-6277-they ship all over the country) in King of Prussia, Pa., because they keep a very complete stock. (Forgot to buy it in March while in Paris-dumb!)
I'm posting now from work with an old Michelin Spain/Portugal atlas at my desk, and as you say, Celeste, the road #s keep changing in Andalucia, just like the "evolving" system for purchasing Alhambra tickets! You can reach the A4 from Ronda in two ways: the quickest route, about 1 hr. 40 min, is to take the main road (A376 on my atlas) past La Quinta to Algondonales where you'll pick up the A382 past Arcos de la Frontera to the Jerez entrance to the A4 "autopista Cadiz-Seville",or if you'd like a more leisurely, picturesque route to Arcos de la Frontera through a couple of the scenic white hill towns, then after passing La Quinta on the main Ronda-Algondonales road, detour off on the route (currently called the C344!)through pristine little Grazalema, the Puerto del Boyar mountain pass and El Bosque. This drive isn't too challening (I drove most of it myself last summer, and to see some lovely countryside, it's well worth your while if you have the time.
I'm also going to supplement my regional maps with route planning printouts from the www.shellgeostar site for our long trip to the north this summer. I really like this site (as well as www.michelin-travel.com) for detailed routes, travel times, mileage, and I find the travel times usually quite accurate.
Hope this helps, and thanks for giving my regards, Kathy, to your hosts in Seville!
 
May 10th, 2001, 01:43 PM
  #17  
bea
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Two summers ago we drove from Algarve through Andalucia. I bought tje Euro travel atlas of spain and portugal and it was invaluable. got it at Barnes and Noble. I hate having to fold and unfold maps. We drove in to Seville and took an exit long before the one we really needed so did get a bit lost. Try to find out exactly which exit you need to take. Once we got to the hotel we parked the car in the hotel garage for the duration of our stay. In Spain you must reserve a parking place in advance through your hotel and there is usually an extra charge. We stayed in Granada, Sevilla, Rhonda and Cordoba.
 
May 10th, 2001, 03:51 PM
  #18  
Danica
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We rented a car in Malaga, drove to Torremelinos, Marbella, Ronda and Gibralter and back. The driving wasn't that tough, overall, just get out of that left lane quickly! Ronda is beautiful. The drive was not easy, I was in second gear all the way down the mountain, palms sweating, no guard rails..if I were to do it again, I'd have left the car in Marbella and taken the tram up to Ronda. The info is listed in the Fodors.
 
May 10th, 2001, 05:54 PM
  #19  
Maribel
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Kathy,
Just a correction-looked at my new #446, and the Grazalema-Puerto del Boyar-El Bosque road to Arcos is now called the #A327 (the old #344). I'm just going to carry this map around with me at all times to get the #'s right! And please don't be afraid of the San Pedro de Alcantara-Ronda road. I drove it myself last June, and while it's as serpentine as they come, it's very well maintained, wide enough for passing lanes, trucks, heavy machinery and does have guardrails now, plus it's the route that all the tour buses with their daytrippers from the coast take daily, and the scenery is spectacular!
 
May 11th, 2001, 06:43 AM
  #20  
celeste
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The drive Granada-Seville or vice-versa was not that tough. Before we left, we got tons of help from everybody especially Maribel re same route. It's just a typical drive around mountainous area here in US, only difference are very narrow roads. Just take precautions (use your horn) when entering a blind corner. The most challenging driving for us was going up and down Arcos dela Frontera, boy that was tough!
 

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