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Denied entry to UK; could this give me problems going to Estonia?

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Sep 30th, 2013, 06:38 PM
  #1
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Denied entry to UK; could this give me problems going to Estonia?

Hello everyone. I may be going to Estonia soon to visit my boyfriend for 8 days, but I had a concern...I was denied entry to the UK, but given temporary entry in the country for 2 days, back in June of this year. Since then, I have been wary of travelling again because it was quite a harrowing experience (detained for like 9 hours) and my first time abroad, so now I'm paranoid that is going to have an effect on my entry into the Schengen zone. The flight I'm probably taking will have a stop in Frankfurt before going to Tallinn.

If you're wondering why I was detained; well I'm an 18 year old female and they said they simply couldnt "trust" I would "be safe" with my boyfriend, who was living there at the time, because I'm "so young", and they also didn't trust I would go back after 1 month/would stay there with him...Then told me if I come back, to plan a shorter trip. They also crossed out the stamp in my passport with "void" in red, which I'm afraid is going to give the immigration elsewhere bad ideas about me.

I really can't afford another experience like that, so can anyone give me any advice? Could this cause me to get sent back to the USA again on my way to Estonia? Thanks!
FariSan is offline  
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Sep 30th, 2013, 06:46 PM
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The UK is one of the toughest European countries to get into. I don't understand the boyfriend thing - how did they know you were visiting your boyfriend. Did you have a return or onward plane/train ticket? You said that you were visiting him for 8 days and then you were visiting him for a month? Which is it?

You're transiting through Frankfurt, not staying in Germany. You should be fine as long as you have a ticket to Tallin.
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Sep 30th, 2013, 06:51 PM
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I was referring to when I was going to the UK, I planned on staying there for a month and they felt that was too long and didn't trust I would go back to the US, so that's why I was rejected. They asked me the reason I was coming to the UK and I said it was to visit my boyfriend, that's how they knew. I meant that when I go to Estonia I plan on being there for only 8 days.
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Sep 30th, 2013, 06:53 PM
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You didn't answer the question about a return on onward ticket.
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Sep 30th, 2013, 06:55 PM
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Yeah I just noticed that, sorry. I didn't have the return ticket physically on me when I arrived in the UK. My mistake.
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Sep 30th, 2013, 08:27 PM
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I can totally understand why you were denied entry to the UK--a young girl with no return ticket (or, it appears, even a copy of your round trip flight booking), possibly no evidence of a current job or college placement requiring your return to the U.S., and a boyfriend living in the UK. Those are several huge red flags for any immigration officer.

If you want to try to enter Estonia, you are going to have to be able to prove to the immigration authorities that your ties are so strong to the U.S. that there is no way you would ever stay in Estonia. Can you do that?
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Sep 30th, 2013, 09:58 PM
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"You're transiting through Frankfurt, not staying in Germany. You should be fine as long as you have a ticket to Tallin."

Not quite accurate.

You're entering the Schengen zone in Frankfurt, so that's where you go through immigration: there is, routinely, no immigration control between Germany and Estonia if you fly.

The red cancellation will be a red flag for practically all immigration officers, everywhere, for as long as you've got the current passport. This won 't directly affect your ability to enter anywhere except the UK and Ireland (for which it's probably wise to get a visa in advance), but it makes it very likely that the officials in Frankfurt will ask you questions.

Make sure you answer accurately, and have a clear demonstration you won't be in the Schengen area after your eight days are up. This should include both your return ticket and evidence of why you'll go back to the US (like a college admission, or a job contract).

The Germans aren't trying to catch you out: but they're not going to go out of their way to make life easy for someone who's been refused admission to a similar country. They're also busy, and enjoy paperwork no more than anyone else - so it's not certain you will be questioned.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 12:11 AM
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You may have to have some discussions at check-in with your airline, since they have to bring you home if you are rejected they tend to want know that you will not become their problem. Make sure all your details are to hand there as well as at Frankfurt.

As Flanner says.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 07:52 AM
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I'd get a new passport. It's not hard.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 08:30 AM
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I agree w/ Big Russ. I would get a new passport ASAP and hopefully not run afoul of border agents w/ the new one.

You could run into problems at every step of the way w/ that red stamp in your old passport. And possibly you'd be denied boarding your outgoing flight simply because the red "VOID" would spook the airline staff. Frankfurt is the least of your problems.

And for pities sake - have a RT ticket and reasonable answers next time.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 08:33 AM
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I too would pump for a new passport... however with the Fed Shutdown that's probably not possible now.

Follow Flanner's advice - have all the paperwork and proofs necessary with you and you should be able to pretty well prepare your verbal responses to the questions you'll know from experience are likely to come.

Assuming you're lucid, cogent, confident and open and honest it shouldn't be a problem.

Dr D.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 08:50 AM
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Since you haven't booked your flight, my guess is this trip is at least a few months away - right?

If so, the Gov't 'shutdown' probably won't be a big problem. But yes, if you are going in the next few weeks you may be SOL.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 08:51 AM
  #13
 
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I generally agree with the suggestion of getting a new passport without the red tell-tale sign. Since UK and Schengen don't pool immigration data - not routinely in any case, they won't find out about your UK refusal with a brand-new passport. And carry supporting documents as advised.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 09:03 AM
  #14
 
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Passport operations haven't shut down (ABC news pointed out that they are funded by fees, not appropriations.)

See: http://travel.state.gov/passport/passport_1738.html
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Oct 1st, 2013, 09:07 AM
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Well - that solves your problem . . .
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Oct 1st, 2013, 09:48 AM
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Wow, thank you everyone for all your advice. I guess getting a new passport before then really is my best bet. I admit I was stupid/naive last time I travelled, I know, but I'll be sure to bring everything I need to ensure I don't run into a big stressful hassle again. You live and learn I guess. Thanks again.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 10:01 AM
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the sooner the better, because if this shutdown lasts too long, I think the passport offices can be closed, or there won't be as many people renewing passports so it takes longer.

I think your problems was in just going without a return ticket, sounds very suspicous.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 11:07 AM
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The UK is very strict in terms of requiring young people to demonstrate that they are not planning on becoing illegal immigrants (as in return or onward plane ticket) as well as knowing the name of the hotel you will stay in (staying with a boyfriend is a red flag for illegal immigration) as well as not having substantial funds.

I don;t know how strict they are in Estonia but think the notation on your current passport could be a big issue. And I fear the government office are already shutting down.

I would make sure you have all of the required information - including a return ticket and a good reason you will be returning to the US (your job or school or whtaever) at the time specified.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 11:33 AM
  #19
 
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The new passport will be helpful as it will remove an immediately visible red flag, but keep in mind that information about this event is maintained electronically and when you are being processed through passport control will likely appear. Be prepared to succinctly state what occurred, and be sure that now you have the information necessary to show your intent to not overstay.
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Oct 1st, 2013, 11:47 AM
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What Seamus says is very important.

UK Border Control never forgets. Everything that happened to you last time you tried to enter is documented electronically and will be recalled next time you try to enter the UK. Your name is in the database, and there is probably an eyescan as well. This probably won't stop you from entering if everything checks out, but you don't want to do this in too many European countries if you can help it because it will slow your travel immeasurably.

A new passport and the rest of the advice above is excellent. You will need a round trip ticket, physical preferred, enough money to support you while you are in the country, and a plausible story about where you are going and why.

Some of what happened was because you were young, some because you were female, and some because you were a ditz. I can't believe your airline let you on without a return ticket. Don't give them the opportunity to reject you next time.
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