Croatian food

Old Feb 4th, 2017, 08:44 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 190
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Croatian food

We will visit Zagreb, Dubrovnik, Kotor (Montenegro) and Mostar (B/H) on our trip. Would love to know your 'must eats' for regional cuisine, including desserts. We have La Struk on our list for strukli in Zagreb. We also want to try peka and, Pasticada. What else should we be on the lookout for, and if you have restaurant recommendations for them, that would be great. It's looking like we will enjoy eating on this trip.
mku4440 is offline  
Old Feb 4th, 2017, 09:06 AM
  #2  
kja
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 22,984
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Here are my old comments on the restaurants at which I dined in the area:
http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...rant-notes.cfm

If your guidebook doesn't have a good section on Croatian foods, I urge you to consult one that does -- each region of Croatia has its own delightful options!
kja is offline  
Old Feb 4th, 2017, 10:57 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 10,169
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I would rather suggest kinds of food than particular places.

First, fish is spectacular, but it is generally market priced by weight, so you need to know what you are getting into lest you suffer sticker shock. The best fish we had were actually in a fish market in the main square in Dubrovnik, but we had delicious fish in Zadar and elsewhere.

Second, there are roadside taverns -- konoba -- that have spits outside on which whole pigs, sheep, and beeves are roasted. Served with roasted vegetables, hard to go wrong.

Third, Croatia has the best pizza I have ever eaten, and it is cheap. Thin crust, no weird toppings like pineapple. There is a bar in DBV again that is justly famous for pizza. In general, Croatian food is a lot more like Italian food than Central European food, but watch for sandwiches called cevapcici(?) that go back to Turkish days.

Croatians are very proud of their wine, but I actually preferred their beer.
Ackislander is offline  
Old Feb 4th, 2017, 12:14 PM
  #4  
kja
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 22,984
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If I may add a bit to what Ackislander said:

Italian-influenced cuisine is common in northwestern Croatia, and particularly in Istria -- which was part of Italy until WWII. (And given the popularity of Italian foods with tourists, it is increasingly common in any of the major tourist destinations in Croatia.)

Further inland, in Zagreb and northeastern Croatia, the cuisine still bears influences of the Austro-Hungarian empire.

Turkish influences are most common in Dalmatia.

As noted, fresh fish and seafood are common in any of the coastal regions.
kja is offline  
Old Feb 4th, 2017, 01:07 PM
  #5  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 190
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thank you! Is the cevapcici worth trying?
mku4440 is offline  
Old Feb 4th, 2017, 01:20 PM
  #6  
kja
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 22,984
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
IMO, yes, cevapcici (aka Ćevapi) are well worth trying. And they aren't necessarily sandwiches -- they are often served as patties or kebabs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ćevapi
kja is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
melaly
Europe
8
Apr 8th, 2018 06:33 AM
james_lee
Europe
5
Sep 8th, 2013 03:31 PM
adam7
Europe
12
Oct 23rd, 2008 03:00 PM
Gina2003
Europe
18
May 27th, 2007 05:13 AM
melandaryl
Europe
9
Oct 7th, 2004 08:35 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:32 PM.