Country with the worst food?

Jan 10th, 2006, 08:25 AM
  #41  
 
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lyb - why do you take life so seriously? There's humour to be found in the negative . . . As for the "country with the worst food", lyb, I suspect everyone responding on this post would agree that the question is hardly an objective approach to avoiding certain regions for fear of nausea. I'm guessing tomboy is just having fun.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 09:03 AM
  #42  
 
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Ira,

Sorry about the bad Scotch Egg. I must confess I have had a bad one too. It was someplace in South Carolina, as I remember, in a "Scotish" Pub. I saw them on the menu and ordered some with enthusiasm for me and my companions.

They were made with a "pickled" egg in the middle, and were just disgusting. Never had such a thing in Britain. I suspect the pickling process was to retard spoilage so the wretched things could sit in the kitchen for weeks until needed.

Yuck!

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Jan 10th, 2006, 10:22 AM
  #43  
lyb
 
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snoopy,

I don't take life seriously, but I just don't see the point of focusing on the negative and there have been quite a few of those type of threads lately. Like I said, I don't see the point..that's all. I subscribe to the philosophy that you get what you focus on. Focus on negative, you get negative, focus on positive, you get positive.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 10:32 AM
  #44  
KT
 
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"I suspect the pickling process was to retard spoilage so the wretched things could sit in the kitchen for weeks until needed."

Scotch eggs are never needed.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 10:50 AM
  #45  
 
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Scotch eggs a favourite of mine.

The secret lies in the composition of the ground pork (the sausage meat) enclosing the boiled egg. The ratio of fat and lean pork and the seasonings mixed in (just salt and black pepper works best), and the proper coating of breadcrumbs (or 'Paxo' as my mother used) will determine how good the end result will be.

There are few things more delicious than a good english sausage, especially chipolatas. Eaten hot, with HP Sauce. Yum.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 10:57 AM
  #46  
 
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Mozambique, everything seemed to be road kill with peri peri sauce add for taste.

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http://www.franceinfocus.net/vlc6.html
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Jan 10th, 2006, 11:12 AM
  #47  
 
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Now, are you looking for the country who's best food is the worst ever tasted, or their worst food is the worst ever tasted?

Having only been to six countries (and all very similar! US, Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland), I can say that the worst meal I've ever had was in the US. And I think the best meal I've ever had was in the US, too. Of course, I've lived there most my life. Oh, wait, no... the best meal of my life is in Canada. Fresh picked strawberries I picked, with thick, handmade bread and fresh from the churn butter, lightly toasted on a Franklin Stove older than my grandma. yummmmmmmmmmmmmm....

Oh, wait, were we discussing restaurant meals?

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Jan 10th, 2006, 11:31 AM
  #48  
 
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I went on a church choir tour to England when I was 2 1/2 months pregnant with my first child...lots of the meals were "set" (they bought us all a plate of the same thing.) I was sick as a dog as it was, and that food did not help a bit!
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Jan 10th, 2006, 12:10 PM
  #49  
 
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Without a doubt, Burma. They put a paste of uncooked, air-dried shrimp on everything. If you walk into a Burmese market, the smell hits you from 1000 paces.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 12:25 PM
  #50  
 
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Russia would have to be my choice. I can remember coming downstairs on the first morning for the buffet breakfast and of the approx 20 dishes that were laid out, there was only one dish that my husband and I were prepared to try. Both of us are fairly adventurous in our food choices but most of the dishes looked liked youghurt with a oil poured on top of it.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 01:12 PM
  #51  
 
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I have a friend who visited the USSR in the mid-80s. He said at every restaurant there was one "choice"....boiled beef and boiled potatoes.

Another friend studied at a Chinese law school one summer in the mid-80s. He said that every meal was rice and a pickle...and since they were Americans, they also got a boiled egg. The Chinese students just got the rice and pickle.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 01:25 PM
  #52  
 
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lyb, I take the point to be that if you know where the food is consistently bad, you can plan accordingly.

Remember, if you go to Las Vegas with someone who loses 90% of the time, you can make money by betting the other way.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 01:33 PM
  #53  
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Y'all can't pick your own country. Obviously, if one eats 20 dinners in Molvania, of which one is horrible, and 22,000 (a lifetime) in your home country of which 50 were horrible, Molvania is the worst (%wise, at least)
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Jan 10th, 2006, 02:42 PM
  #54  
lyb
 
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robespierre,

okay, I see your point...
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Jan 10th, 2006, 02:48 PM
  #55  
 
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Russia,

Many years ago Russian nuclear scientists came to the Nevada Test Site to monitor our underground explosions as part of the nuclear test ban. We fed them quite well while they were here.

When our group went to their test site, a really remote part of the world, they told us that they could not hope to feed us the way we had fed them; that we should bring our own "special" foods with us.

A C-5 was duitfully loaded with our people and our foodstuffs, which were turned over to the Russian cooks. They were confused by the heads of lettace, which they had never seen. The first night at dinner we were served boiled lettace.

At the risk of a diplomatic incident, the mysteries of iceberg lettace and salads were explained to the Russian authorities, and we were assured that all would now be well.

Next morning we were served salad for breakfast -- and for every meal thereafter.



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Jan 10th, 2006, 02:52 PM
  #56  
 
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China. I was there for 3 weeks and came back with baggy clothes. I decided to just starve, instead of having my palate and stomach suffer.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 02:54 PM
  #57  
 
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By the way... in Russia lettuce is a "garbage" vegetable. A good Russian salad is without lettuce altogether.

I remember back when I was 14 (1992) and went to Russia for the first time, as part of one of those tour groups. Almost every meal we ate was in a hotel- and the food was always bland and dull.

The ONE good meal we had was when we left the group for an evening and met a family friend at a Georgian restaurant- the food was incredible!

I think if you are making the touristy rounds in any country, you will find bland (in their eyes Americanized foods. If you eat where the locals eat, you will get a great meal.

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Jan 10th, 2006, 03:17 PM
  #58  
 
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England. But that was 25 yrs ago. Train food. I was warned but I ate it anyway. A cheese sandwich. God was I sick. Also in Oxford at Exeter the combo breakfasts were disguisting. Beans and fried eggs. But the marmalade was heavenly and I lived for it.
This past November we had an unexpected stayover in London and I had one of my best meals ever. Indian lamb stew. Amazing.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 03:23 PM
  #59  
 
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USNR, maybe the lousy food you struck in China was a tour company problem? We stayed clear of hotel restaurants, took pot luck or followed a "Lonely Planet" reco, sometimes just bought steamed buns at a street stall. Admittedly the food in north China isn't usually up to Cantonese standards and some of our meals were pretty forgettable, but I still have fond memories of many. Don't get me started on that delicious Beggar's Chicken in Hangzhou....

Several people who've taken a breakneck see-Europe-in-ten-days tour have complained to me about the food in Italy and France, of all places. Maybe so many of their customers are from the "errrk - I'm not eating THAT!" school of gastronomy that the tour companies see no point (or profit) in giving them a gourmet experience.
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Jan 10th, 2006, 03:27 PM
  #60  
 
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Worst food v. worst meal... hmmm...

Overall worst food, probably Poland in the 70s. Slime and mash. The vodka helped, though.

Worst single meal of note, chicken and chips at a chip shop in St Andrews, Ecosse. Back when the battery chickens were fed fish meal, then the chicken was flung into the same oil as the fish.

Dishonorable mention - Chinese glop from a Sydney Chinatown takeaway. Shame on the authorities for letting that man run a shop.
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