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Cheese & Pickle ~ Help me do it right?

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Sep 24th, 2012, 03:30 PM
  #1
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Cheese & Pickle ~ Help me do it right?

I have the cheddar cheese and the Branston pickle, but need directions please.
What kind of bread makes a proper cheese & pickle sandwich?
Butter or other additions?
Thank you to the UK!
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Sep 24th, 2012, 03:46 PM
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Oh my gosh, that's my favorite sandwich ever!! People in the US think I'm nuts.
I like a nice soft bread, not too strong to over-power the cheese and pickle. Butter, slice the pickles very thin and layer the cheese then pickle...yum!

It's definitely an aquired taste. My Mom ate them while pregnant so I was born with a taste for them

Darn, now I'm craving one.
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Sep 24th, 2012, 04:14 PM
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Thanks but my Branston pickle is like a thick relish.
What kind of pickles are you slicing? And you're using cheddar cheese, right?
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Sep 24th, 2012, 04:37 PM
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I don't use any butter with pickle and use any type of mild bread such as white or oatmeal. IMHO dark bread would detract from the pickle flavor.

I also like pickles on my sandwiches but that's another discussion.
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Sep 24th, 2012, 05:37 PM
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Stilton isn't bad either.

I use a whole grain bread.

And an apple.

Some pale ale or cider is not amiss.
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Sep 24th, 2012, 10:47 PM
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All a matter of taste. It isn't a gourmet experience for most of us.
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Sep 24th, 2012, 11:10 PM
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hollywoodsc: 'pickle' isn't like kosher dill pickles or sweet gherkins that one can slice. It is a brown relish made of finely chopped veggies. Believe it or not - cauliflower, carrots, rutabaga, onions and marrows (squash).

nyse: Just experiment to see how you like it best. I personally don't use butter when using pickle and usually a crusty/country white bread.

But sometimes I also just like to take Carr's wheatmeal biscuits and put a slice of cheese and a dollop of pickle on each one - instead of making a 'real' sandwich.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 12:38 AM
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I like it with brown bread or rolls. LAtely I have been using Pappperride Farms frozen whole wheat rolls. Noticed that Branston makes a fine cut relish in addirition to the reglar. Haven't tried it yet
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Sep 25th, 2012, 12:44 AM
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Nice crusty white bread, thin spread of butter, thick slices of strong cheddar and a good spreading of branston on top.
Also good with baked potatoes. just add buter to baked potato,some grated cheese and a dollop of branston on top.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 01:05 AM
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If you use cheddar, make sure it's a really good one. Unfortunately the name isn't protected. A Californian friend tried Montgomery's cheddar and says that it has put her off all other versions.
The website http://www.farmhousecheesemakers.com/ unfortunately doesn't say where you can buy it in the US
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Sep 25th, 2012, 01:14 AM
  #11
 
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I like it with crusty bread, just one slice or with crackers. Pickled onions on the side. Just bought some porc pies with pickle at a fair in Norfolk. Yum! I always bring back some jars of Branston pickles. You can buy them in plastic containers.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 01:27 AM
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Cheddar and mango chutney is also a good combination. And toasting the sandwich is good too. I don't use butter, pickle or chutney is sufficient lubrication.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 02:51 AM
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Back in 2004 the Branston Pickle factory burnt down and jars were being sold on EBay ... http://preview.tinyurl.com/c38em73 At one point people were actually trying to sell part used jars!
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Sep 25th, 2012, 03:04 AM
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Personally, I find Branston pickle too coarse and acid for use in a cheese sandwich. There are plenty of alternatives on sale in British supermarkets, made with many different fruits and vegetables. None is more authentic than any other - it's just a matter of taste. A smooth pickle made with apple or tomato is probably best for a sandwich.

Although Cheddar is the commonest British cheese, and comes in many different styles, there are lots of other cheeses suitable for sandwiches - Leicester, Double Gloucester, Wensleydale, Caerphilly, Cheshire, etc. All have their own characteristics. There are also a lot of artisan cheeses available now, which you will findn at street markets, country fairs and farm shops, as well as at specialist cheese shops.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 03:57 AM
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well are you doing an open sandwich or a closed one. I'd prefer to use a bun or a roll (assuming this is wholemeal bread with seeds and stuff in, white bread must be eaten by someone, I guess), tear it open, stuff in cheese (not very flavoured so maybe a mature cheddar or a very runny somerset brie) and obviously not butter (who eats butter and cheese? what next extra virgin olive oil and olive oil, yuch) and then some pickle on top of that. Trouble is Branston pickle is basically the Macdonalds of pickle (cheap, tasteless, and far too salty (to keep it cheap)), you would do better at any market stall in any festival in the UK or I guess US. (avoid pikilili, gastly stuff even if spelt correctly)
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Sep 25th, 2012, 05:35 AM
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Mature cheddar and branston is excellent on buttered crusty white or wholemeal bread. Wholemeal or Hovis doesn't have seeds etc in, that's granary or multi seed here in the UK.

By the way Avalon2, I've tried the fine chopped Branston and it just doesn't do it for me. The whole point of Branston is the crunch that you get from it. The fine version just doesn't have that.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 06:08 AM
  #17
 
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Must admit i prefered Pan Yan pickle to Branston but I don't think it is made anymore
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Sep 25th, 2012, 09:11 AM
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Something a little different are cheese and pickle scones.
http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/2...chutney-scones
My family pounce on them warm from the oven spread with butter.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 10:16 AM
  #19
 
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Branston pickle for me is one of those nostalgic taste sensations... it may be 'cheap' but there is no substitute for a real cheese-n-pickle sarnie! Takes me back to childhood straight away.
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Sep 25th, 2012, 10:21 AM
  #20
 
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I grew up on this and learned to hate it but am back again to loving it. Plain old white bread with a scrape of butter, the Branston and the cheddar. Serve a pickled onion on the side and it's heaven!
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