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Can I use video camera & 35 mm camera inside Paris' museums and churches?

Can I use video camera & 35 mm camera inside Paris' museums and churches?

Mar 13th, 2001, 06:45 AM
  #1  
hhouston
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Can I use video camera & 35 mm camera inside Paris' museums and churches?

Was wondering if there are any restrictions in what pictures can be taken in Paris' major museums and cathedrals. Thanks!
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 07:35 AM
  #2  
m
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Without a flash you should be OK. General in museum flashes are not permitted although many people use the anyway. The reason is the light from the flash can do damage. I would never you a flash even if other's were. i don't know what kind of camera you have but i used 800 film in musuems and the photos came out great. I don't know about churches. The video camera should be ok as long as it doesn't have a light.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 09:05 AM
  #3  
Bob
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We didn't find any place where we couldn't use our camera. Most of the museums were not inforcing the no flash rule. I wish they would because the harm done by the light.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 12:28 PM
  #4  
Shanna
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My first visit to the Louvre (70s), in front of the Mona Lisa, watched a guard snatch a flashing camera from a man's hands, rip it open and throw it on the floor. Scary - lesson learned.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 12:38 PM
  #5  
Sally
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Went to the D'Orsay last Nov. and was stopped by security inside the museum from taking pictures with my 35 mm. But I had already taken a couple of rolls. Therefore, yes to your question only until you get caught.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 03:39 PM
  #6  
Darcy
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I took pictures of the Mona Lisa in the Louvre with a flash. No one said anything. But then again, there were no security guards. Like the previous poster said, it's ok, as long as you scout for security in the area before you take it.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 04:04 PM
  #7  
Rich
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We were in Paris in November and saw cameras (even with flash) used in all museams and even Notre Dame. Most had signs prohibiting Flash, but no one seemed to pay attention.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 05:20 PM
  #8  
Marc David Miller
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I make a point of never photographing a delicate work of art (painting, fabric--no problem generally with sculpture) with a flash--my descendents five hundred years hence will be appreciative.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 05:43 PM
  #9  
Mini
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Unfortunately, many camera manufacturers have for some reason opted to sell cameras for which the flash cannot be turned off = it will go off automatically. You know, there's strength in numbers....I wonder if enough of us protested to the various manufacturers, if it would have any effect.

Hhouston, even as a camera buff, you will very likely find you can get better pictures - at lower cost - by purchasing the excellent post cards and guidebooks available at many museums and galleries. I treasure the small but delightful book I bought from the Uffizi gallery in Florence, which is sold at a very reasonable price. The cameras used by the producers of these items have fantastic lenses, and the producers of course have access to the art when millions of people aren't milling around.

As other people implied, don't think of them as 'restrictions', think of them as 'protections' for the art. Have a great time in France!


 
Mar 13th, 2001, 06:37 PM
  #10  
Alice
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Using flash on works of art because 'security isn't looking' is akin to hopping a free ride on the vaporetto because you probably won't be caught. Neither actions are admirable.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 07:01 PM
  #11  
Howard
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While I wholeheartedly agree with those who criticize the use of flash when taking pictures of the great masters, I cannot concur Mini's comments about postcards being a good (or better) substitute for your own photographs. No true photographer would feel that way, no matter how good the postcards nor how average his/her own photographs may be. Sure, buy the photographs as a supplement, not a replacement! (Of course, I'm talking about museum pictures taken without flash!) And, as a previous poster has said, try some 800 ASA film in the museums.
 
Mar 13th, 2001, 11:17 PM
  #12  
billie
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Our cameral guy recommended one of those little collapsible tripods - cheap and effective for low light/slow film situations.
 
Mar 14th, 2001, 03:14 AM
  #13  
mini
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Howard, I am amused by your suggestion that there are 'true' photographers versus....what, imposters?

Postcards, I agree, are perhaps not as good as the quality of the prints in the souvenir guidebooks. Yet an internationally recognized art expert, Sister Wendy, studied the galleries and museums of the world without stepping a foot from her convent (until she was discovered by the BBC.) You'll never guess what the source of her material was...yup, postcards and books sent to her as gifts by former students and friends.

Good enough for an internationally recognized art expert, good enough for me, as they say....
 
Mar 14th, 2001, 03:23 AM
  #14  
mini
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Since I have inadvertently introduced a religious theme, via the charming Sister, I might as well take the opportunity to point out that the 'true' purpose of a church is not a tourist attraction, and the art therein is intended to give worshippers a sense of humility.

My, my, do I hear some of the great masters laughing?
 
Mar 14th, 2001, 07:20 AM
  #15  
Howard
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Sorry, Mini, I probably use the wrong phrase, i.e., "true photographer." What I meant to say is that I believe that most serious photographers (both amateurs like me or professionals) take take great pride in what they've created (i.e., a photograph), much like an artist does, I would think. My best recollections of my trips are the photographs I've taken. And I work long and hard to create each page in my albums.
When I am not allowed to take photographs, I, too, have occasionally bought a postcard. I think back to last fall, when in the museum at LaScala, we got a peek into the famed opera house from one of its boxes. Unfortunately, we were not allowed to take any photographs (not even without flash). Since it was indeed a sight to behind, I bought a postcard of it. But, as beautiful as the postcard is, it wasn't and isn't the same to me!
(P.S.: My wife is not a photographer and she can't relate to this "photographer's point of view" either. And, no, I'm not saying, "My wife doesn't understand me"!)
 
Mar 14th, 2001, 08:07 AM
  #16  
mini
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Howard, your gracious reply certainly merits one from me.

I did not mean to dismiss the great pleasure that you take from very precise photography. However, you have raised a very complex problem that is common to other areas of the tourist industry as well. We all as travellers would like to be treated with the respect due individuals, certainly conscientious individuals such as yourself and others. However, there are practical problems; as travellers, we are not individuals, but only a very small sample of hundreds of thousands.

In this case, I quite understand your plea to have the merits of photography treated on a case by case basis; I am sure that you take great care not to use flash. But, there are enormous practical problems posed to museums and churches in trying to treat thousands of people as individuals. Educating people takes time and money, to say nothing of ensuring enforcement. You may have an idea for how to approach this problem, but at present I can't think of any way other than to opt for a solution that hardly meets the most exacting aesthetic standards with respect to providing a memento of a gallery, but then, a mass-produced problem often requires a mass-produced solution, if it is to be simple to implement and cost-effective.

Cheers, and enjoy your trip.
 
Mar 14th, 2001, 08:43 AM
  #17  
Howard
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First of all, Mini, may I say, it's a pleasure to have this intelligent dialogue on the forum!
I don't know how you interpreted my comments. I didn't intend them to be a plea for anything. I was merely trying to explain how personal I feel about my photographs being so much a part of my experiencing something. It's not an easy thing for someone else to internalize. As I said before, not even my wife really understands how I feel about it. It's a very personal thing.
 
Mar 14th, 2001, 11:11 AM
  #18  
Caitlin
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Only the cheapest point-and-shoot camera will have a flash that can not be disabled; perhaps you should take a good look at the manual!

Aside from the respect/preservation of art issues that are so callously ignored by so many, a flash will honestly not make a difference in most museum/church settings. So leave it off. If you wish to take pictures inside churches and cathedrals, by all means get a mini tripod; it will make a huge difference with the long exposure time you need in those low-light conditions. (Incidentally, if you don't disable your flash and have your camera set to automatically meter the light, it will use a shorter exposure but the flash will not improve your photos.)

I believe photography (without flash) is permitted in most places, and if it's not, I'm sure there will be easily-seen signage telling you so!
 
Mar 14th, 2001, 11:22 AM
  #19  
Ess
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Usually, if I can't say something constructive then I say nothing at all -- but I can't help myself this time. The only really depressing sight I saw in Paris was hordes of people shuffling like herds through the Louvre with their video cameras whirring and cameras snapping. I don't think anyone actually looked at the art until they got home and looked at their pictures/videos. Sad.
 

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