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Can I buy Paris train carnet package online?

Can I buy Paris train carnet package online?

May 10th, 2015, 03:01 AM
  #1  
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Can I buy Paris train carnet package online?

Is it possible to buy the train ticket package in Paris online so I do not have to worry about it when I get there? It looks kind of confusing and I don't speak French to translate. I will be with my brother but he's only there for a few days then I will be on my own and I need to prepare. Too late to back out now. What is the best way to get around or should I get a bus package?
zhangee39 is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 03:17 AM
  #2  
 
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You can order a carnet of 10 tickets for use of the metro and buses but it's, imo, not worth the hassle and cost when you can buy them at any staffed metro station and any tabac (they ususally display a small oval RATP sign outside the shop). The automated machines in the metro stations may sell carnets as well, I'm not sure as I take the buses or walk these days.

A carnet saves 27% of the cost, wiped out by delivery charges if ordere d online unless picked up at the tourist office.

http://reservation.parisinfo.com/z62...7m466_fr-.aspx

The carnets are not good for train fares (sncf).
Cathinjoetown is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 03:18 AM
  #3  
 
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The ticket machines are in 5 languages. I really cannot imagine how anybody could find it confusing.

The tickets work on the metro, municipal buses and tramways.
kerouac is online now  
May 10th, 2015, 03:23 AM
  #4  
 
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There would be no purpose whatsoever to doing that when you just walk up to a machine in a metro station and buy them, which would be infinitely more convenience than having to pick them up in a Tourist Office. If you are hung up on the dire warnings about needing a chip credit card to use machines, just use cash, it's not difficult. They are only about 8 euro, after all.
Christina is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 03:24 AM
  #5  
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I didn't know it was in 5 different languages. That makes it much better. This is all new to me so hopefully English is one of them. Thank you for the fast response.
zhangee39 is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 03:26 AM
  #6  
 
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oh, even if you think a machine is too confusing, walk up to a ticket clerk in a metro station and just say "one carnet, please". Now ideally in French, but I'm sure they would know enough English to understand that. Hold up one finger to show one or something. Do learn how to pronounce carnet. You should learn how to say please and thank you in French, anyway.
Christina is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 03:27 AM
  #7  
 
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The carnet is 14.10 euros. The machine is easy to change into English (as are ATMs throughout the city) and very simple to use.
artsnletters is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 03:44 AM
  #8  
 
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Are you landing at CDG Airport and taking the RER into Paris - if so just buy a carnet or two or three at the same time you buy your RER into Paris ticket.

don't forget to keep your used ticket until you get out of the metro - you need to put it into a turnstile to get into the system and often the same ticket to get out at your ultimate exit and in large stations like Gare du Nord watch out for folks coming up to 'help' you buy metro tickets from machines - a longtime scam some try.
PalenQ is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 04:07 AM
  #9  
 
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The metro tickets machines are very easy to operate. There is a roller bar to scroll down through various ticket choices and then a validation button to press when you have reached your choice. The selection for English will always be a British flag. If you need to go to the window, this French phrase will work. "Bonjour, madame. Je voudrais acheter un carnet, s'il vous plait." It translates to Hello, mam. I would like to buy one carnet, please. They do not have the metro tickets behind the counter anymore. They will, however, give you instructions on how to use the machines. I remember many years ago, when I barely knew more than "bonjour" I simply held up 10 fingers at the window. She laughed and sent 10 metro tickets through the little slot.
Flaneur5 is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 04:44 AM
  #10  
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Okay I think I can figure the machine out if not I'll go to the window. I'm landing at CDG but I was planning to take a taxi then meet my brother late in the evening when he's done with work. Is the RER better? I do not mind paying a little more if the taxi is more convenient especially after a long flight but what do you think I should do? Do you also know where the ATM is located at the airport? Thank you for responding to my queries.
zhangee39 is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 04:52 AM
  #11  
 
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Taxi will be a lot more expensive. But a lot depends on where in Paris you are going. If your destination (your brother's workplace or a hotel or whatever) isn't anywhere near the RER line and you have lots of heavy luggage a taxi might be more convenient. Perhaps ask your brother what he thinks you should do.
anyegr is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 05:07 AM
  #12  
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We are staying in Bastille. He said it might be better to take a taxi but he will already be there and this is also his first time. Do you know what a taxi would cost? It will be around 7:30-8:00 PM. I wasn't going to check my luggage so it should be faster.
zhangee39 is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 05:38 AM
  #13  
 
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Follow the signs in the airport, wait a few minutes in the official taxi line and take a taxi into town. It will take around 45 mins to 1 hour, depending on traffic, and will cost around 60 EU. It will be worth it, especially after a long flight. You will pay the amount on the meter plus 1 EU for each piece of luggage in the trunk. Make sure to write down the complete address of where you're staying and hand it to the driver. Not all of them can speak English.
manouche is offline  
May 10th, 2015, 05:54 AM
  #14  
 
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Be careful about asking for a carnet as a carnet is nothing other than 10 like tickets sold at a reduced price. A carnet can be any group of tickets, if you ask for a carnet at CDG, you might get 10 tickets good only for travel between Paris and CDG.

Usually when asking for a carnet, most visitors want a group of 10 tickets t+, good for the métro, most buses, tramways and the funicular, so be specific.

If this is your first trip to Paris, I would strongly recommend your taking a taxi. Do not accept offers from clandestine drivers soliciting from within the terminals. Go to the official taxi queue, usually near the customs/baggage claim exits. Expect to pay around 55€, taxi drivers are generally not tipped but I will add a couple of euros if the drivers helps with the luggage.
Sarastro is online now  
May 10th, 2015, 10:07 PM
  #15  
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The taxi is probably the best way to go for me. It's my first time and have jitters because I will be alone most of the time. I was not supposed to go until next year but things came up so rushing to get things together. One more question, sorry I have so many and I know this is kind of silly but I've always wanted to go out to the receiving area of an airport and see my name held up on a sign. I never got around to doing it because it was always too expensive, but now that I can afford it, not sure if they do that there? Can you recommend a reliable company? If I should do this somewhere else, please inform me too. Thanks so much.
zhangee39 is offline  
May 11th, 2015, 12:03 AM
  #16  
 
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I recommend you avoid any of the tourist oriented shuttle companies, private or shared ride. Never, ever pay in advance if you should actually contact one of these companies. Shuttle companies are notorious at CDG for not showing or showing late.

Take a taxi as has been noted above. However, there is a car service that I use called Navendis. The fees are basically the same as taxis. At your scheduled arrival time, the driver will both text and call your phone to confirm pickup and exact location. Sometimes they have a sign with your name but I prefer that they do not. The reason I rarely mention Navendis is they typically transport corporate customers and do not necessarily have English speaking drivers.

Navendis does now have English available on their website so you could contact them and explain your needs if you are interested:

http://www.navendis.com/en/index.html
Sarastro is online now  
May 11th, 2015, 10:32 PM
  #17  
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Thank you so much. My brother also says thanks. We're both going to take a taxi.
zhangee39 is offline  
May 12th, 2015, 10:50 PM
  #18  
 
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Relax.. most tourists to France do not speak French. I think you need a few tips too.

First..when dealing with anyone.. store clerk, ticket clerk, anyone.. always start with Bonjour madam or monsieur. Its something many of us do not always think to do.. but the French consider it abrupt and rude to just march up to a ticket window, taxi driver or clerk and make a demand without greeting them first. Some people like to say the French can be rude.. but they don't realize the French consider them rude and are only reacting to them not being polite and greeting them. It only takes a few seconds to start on the right foot.

Secondly , keep your eyes and hands on your bag. Do not keep wallet in your back pocket if male. Women, do not hang your purse over the back of your chair at a restaurant.
Do not stop to speak to people who approach you on the street asking " speak English"..basically, ignore strangers who approach you..especially young girls with clip boards who may approach you seemingly to get you to sign a petition for some made up charity.. once you sign they will then ask you for money. Just ignore them. Period.

A carnent.. in case you are not clear.. is simply ten loose one way tickets, good for bus or metro.There is a carnet of tickets for metro/bus.. and for RER, two different things.

Long lines at some museums.. Orsay is one,, same with Louvre.. they however can be avoided by either buying a museum Pass.. or getting there before they open, or using alternate entrances. Do some research on forums , like this one and tripadvisor.com.. what you don't know can cost you extra time and money.
justineparis is offline  
Aug 18th, 2016, 10:32 AM
  #19  
 
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Every metro has machines (choose English, then the first option which is good for metro and bus), then pick 10 because it's cheaper than 8 or 9, stick your card in the reader and leave it their till the screen tells you to remove, 10 tickets show up in the drawer.

There are also ticket booths, the attendants are very helpful.

I was wary of the metro not being from a big city, but we figured it out quickly and by day two we were hopping train to train and getting everywhere we wanted to be. All told my husband and I bought two 2 carnet in the city and it lasted all week. Basically 30 euro total for transporation. Hot deal.

Also, the metro is clean, bright, and very easy to navigate.
hkramb is offline  
Aug 18th, 2016, 10:50 AM
  #20  
 
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The tickets work on the metro, municipal buses and tramways>

and the Montparnasse funicular too I think.
PalenQ is offline  

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