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Beaujolais Nouveau in Paris - how to celebrate

Beaujolais Nouveau in Paris - how to celebrate

Old Oct 24th, 2007, 05:39 PM
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Beaujolais Nouveau in Paris - how to celebrate

We'll be in Paris on on Nov. 15 when the Beaujolais Nouveau is released. Any suggestions for how to celebrate this event in this great city.
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Old Oct 24th, 2007, 05:45 PM
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Drink it???????
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Old Oct 24th, 2007, 06:09 PM
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Ignore the frivolous nonsense and drink some proper wine.
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Old Oct 24th, 2007, 06:48 PM
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Agreed. Best way to celebrate is to pour it down the nearest sink and drink something else.

As I was told in France last week, the Beaujolais Nouveau they send to les Rosbifs. The better Cru wines from the region they keep to themselves.
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Old Oct 24th, 2007, 07:44 PM
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http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34900575

Discussion from last fall about 'beaujolais nouveau'...
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Old Oct 24th, 2007, 10:08 PM
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The "beaujolais nouveau" thing isn't just for tourists/foreigners.

I think that it's best enjoyed in the spirit that it is intended - as a bit of fun. It's not about serious wine appreciation, just a good laugh and an excuse to drink lots of wine on a week night!

In Paris, all the bars and restaurants will be selling the new Beaujolais by the glass/carafe/bottle, and lots of people will be ordering it, even though they know it may well taste like vinegar!!

If you find a decent wine bar, you are much more likely to get a decent(ish) bottle of Beaujolais (not all of it is bad!). So find a wine bar or café, order a carafe or glass, taste it, screw up your face, give a Gallic shrug, and carry on drinking!
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Old Oct 24th, 2007, 10:19 PM
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What a daft bunch of oenosnobs.

The BN can be a perfectly good drinking wine. In fact, it's a dandy choice for Thanksgiving dinner, as it works with the sweet potatoes, all the starches, and the relatively bland bird. And cranberries. It's not a very wintry wine, nor is it many other things - including meant for saving. Drink and be merry - it's not nouveau for nothing.
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Old Oct 24th, 2007, 11:24 PM
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Problem is, tomassocroccante, the French are the biggest wine snobs on the planet (and I visited the Chandon vineyard in California as a guest of a group of French people and they just couldn't bear the fact that US sparkling wine was drinkable).

If any other country produced Beaujoulais Nouveau then you can imagine what the French would say. Yah boo sucks to them. They deserve a bit of derission
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Old Oct 25th, 2007, 12:00 AM
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We just returned from a one-week visit to Beaujolais and visited half a dozen fine producers of Beaujolais grand cru wines. And in fact, we had the chance to sample this year's Nouveau Beaujolais at two wineries, straight from the tanks. Pleasant enough as a light and fruity fermented grape product.
All producers we visited with indicated that they are phasing out their production of NB, and working on upgrading their image by focusing on their grand cru or Beaujolais Villages products. They universally declared that the NB marketing scheme (read "Georges DuBoeuf") was a two-edged sword; they were able to sell vast quantities of inexpensive product for many years, but it ultimately degraded the name "Beaujolais" to the point that many people do not even know that the region also produces some very fine, elegant and fruity wines, now largely overlooked and unknown to the American public.
If you like Nouveau Beaujolais, drink it this year, because it sounds like there will be less in future years as the fad fades. Ask your wine shop to suggest a nice Morgon, Chiroubles or Fleurie beaujolais as a Thanksgiving wine. You might like it!
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Old Oct 25th, 2007, 12:57 AM
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I absolutely agree with La Tour about the quality of some of the other Beaujolais appelations, and the fact that the word "Beaujolais" often puts people off as they are unaware of the wider spectrum of wines being produced there. We are big fans of Chiroubles, Morgon (both of which we chose to serve at our wedding), Brouilly, Fleurie, etc., and always have a good stock of bottles in our cave.
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Old Oct 25th, 2007, 03:06 AM
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Go to Germany and drink the faderweisse. (Barely fermented cloudy white wine)
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Old Oct 25th, 2007, 03:11 AM
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Ineteresting article:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...53C1A9619C8B63
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Old Oct 25th, 2007, 09:58 AM
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I think it could be an okay wine for Thanksgiving, as suggested. It is light and fruity, so should work with Turkey and a lot of my Thanksgiving guests are not wine experts, so they probably would like it. They often ask for something sweet or fruity, less dry as they put it, than the riojas and dry reds I prefer. Brouilly is one of my favorite wines, also, although it's not as easy to find in the US where I live. At least, not cheaply, I have to get it at a special trip to the wine store.

As for BN -- well, if you want to celebrate that wine PR event, just go to a wine bar with signs about it and drink some. What else could you do, that's about it.
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Old Oct 25th, 2007, 10:07 AM
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I was in Paris last year at that time, some restos will have some menu items, and wine on the menu. But I was surprised to find not a lot of events going on. I asked my good friend who lived there and she said it was not a big deal and was more of appeal to tourists, with not a lot of local activities.
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Old Oct 26th, 2007, 04:55 PM
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Thanks everyone for their input. We were in Avignon several years ago for the NB and it was really special. We ended up at a fireworks celebration (in the misty rain) with all the French people singing their national anthem. The streets and restaurants were packed. We drank some of the vinegar tasting wine and remember this night fondly.
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Old Oct 26th, 2007, 05:30 PM
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Beaujolais wines are great. They're technically in the Burgundy region, but at the very south end, and are made from Gamay grapes, unlike all other Burgundy reds, which are Pinot Noir. The most restrictive classification, Cru Beaujolais, come from one of the twelve specific villages, such as Morgon, mentioned by La Tour de Cause above. They are almost always excellent, and are usually much better value than the pricier Burgundies. Broilly, Fleurie, Regnie, Moulin a Vent -- these may not advertise their Beaujolais status in big letters, because of the Beaujolais Noveau taint, but they are Beaujolais AOCs.

Beaujolais-Villages comes from a slightly less-restrictive area, and is almost as good, and better value yet. The least restrictive is plain Beaujolais, which can be pretty great, though I've had some less-good bottles in the under-$10 range.

If you taste even a mediocre Beaujolais, you'll never go back to the Nouveau stuff again -- it's really insipid, like fruit juice. A cheap Beaujolais will suit your turkey dinner much better for the same price.
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Old Oct 30th, 2007, 08:18 AM
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BN is not the best wine in the world. I don't think anyone pretends that it is.

And yes, the whole celebration thing is a gimmick to sell mediocre (at best) wine.

All true.

But I think it is still fun to do anyway. Why not?

Lots of bars in Paris will make a big to do out of it. Midnight on the eve of BN release they'll have a celebration.

My suggestion is to find a bar you like and ask what they plan to do to celebrate the arrival of BN.

And most importantly, have fun!!
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Old Oct 30th, 2007, 08:38 AM
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As hanl said in her first post, it's mostly for fun and the following is one example of how locals enjoy it.

The company I work for has a wine tranportation/stock department. They receive as samples and gifts Beaujolais Nouveau of different labels (incl. George Du Boeuf). Every 3rd Thrusday of November they invite us to taste them at lunch, buffet style, with food, cochonaille sorts. Nothing serious and people enjoy the occasion. So why not go to a bar or a café that has a sign "Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrivé", try a glass or two with some snack or cheese and have a light fun?
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Old Oct 30th, 2007, 08:44 AM
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Tuni01, I too will be in Paris for the "event" or perhaps 'non-event". As luck would have it I have been in France that week each of the last 10 years and I would say sometimes I stumble into a party and sometimes I do not. There is a time and place for everything and giving BN this one night of fun seems appropriate. Yes, it is not the best wine, but neither are many others. keep your eyes open for a place to sit, drink and maybe sing a little..... If you see six slightly tipsy american guys, that would be us... we can raise a glass to the event!
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