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Are you an American exceptionalist to football?

Are you an American exceptionalist to football?

Old Jun 15th, 2006, 08:17 AM
  #21  
 
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>soccer is too boring
The kick and rush the English are paying at this moment is indeed boring.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 08:32 AM
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Here in Canada (Toronto) we see cars driving around the city with the flags of the nation they support flying above their windows.

Toronto is a very multicultural city, and during each game there are areas in the city associated with each country (restaurants,bars) where people of that national origin / supporters gather to cheer on. As we move to the quarters and onwards, there will be streets closed down for celebrations by the winning team supporters. Local news will carry these celebrations. All of the games are on cable. We have a poll at the office picking the teams.

Personally, I only watch every four years, but would at some point like to see a Premiership game as well as a local game at some point over in England. And I don't agree it is boring...Trinidad and Sweden was a great game. And, even though I'm an avid fan of baseball, some games can be pretty slow...

As for holliganism, ever been to the bleachers at a Yankee game? Or a Philadelphia hockey game? Would you take, with no reservation at all, your kids to an NFL game at any stadium in any section? There has been rioting after sporting events in NA, so I don't think there is total purity on our side.

Go France!

Mike
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 08:43 AM
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In Vancouver, Canada, some pubs are open earlier (6am, 9am) for soccer breakfast. And there is a street that is soccer-mad.

In all, I think the biggest deterrent is time. The time being played is not during prime time, thus not accessible to the American mass. And someone pointed out, not commercial-friendly.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 08:48 AM
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I for one am trying to get into it this year. Granted I do not have tv so its difficult. I do follow it on espn.com.
I like the global element it makes me think of my travels, I also like the team concept. The big problem is time, I work so a 2 pm game isn't in the cards. I do plan to take a few days off of work and watch thme at a irish or british pub during round 2. I've actually had to research rules and such just to understand.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 08:57 AM
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>At bottom I think it comes down to the egalitarian socialist mindset versus the individualist, capitalist mindset.

You wanted to say, team spirit versus juvenile hero worship, right?
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:03 AM
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I've been watching every day at work (my editors don't know what to with me) - really enjoyed the Croatia-Brazil game. I don't watch American football. I will watch baseball every now and then. Golf - no. Race car driving - I'd rather eat glass.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:05 AM
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<<As for holliganism, ever been to the bleachers at a Yankee game? Or a Philadelphia hockey game? Would you take, with no reservation at all, your kids to an NFL game at any stadium in any section? There has been rioting after sporting events in NA, so I don't think there is total purity on our side.>>

However rowdy one of those crowds may be, shouting racial slurs or making monkey gestures at players would be unthinkable in the US. The fact that it happens quite regularly in our favorite Euro cities is mind-blowing.
(yes I know, only a 'tiny minority'...please)

<<You wanted to say, team spirit versus juvenile hero worship, right?>>

umm yep, thats exactly what I meant.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:05 AM
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What is a bigger problem for me is that I live in Texas and do not enjoy American football.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:07 AM
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.....and the England/TT score is still 0-0.
/snore/
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:14 AM
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I live in Idaho, watched all the World Cup games, enjoy the whole thing, and don't watch many U.S. "sports". The American announcers are a good reason to turn off the sound and enjoy the games.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:17 AM
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Nope, sorry. Count me as one who can't get excited about it-I grew up on American football and hockey and love them both, and see "soccer" as kind of a "sissy" game with the short pants and the bare knees (yes, I know, that's a bit of an exaggeration).

And I totally disagree with the poster concerning American basketball-basketball has gotten very big in Europe-there's a huge following in France (and yes, you might say that the minorities in these countries are the more avid fans, but nonetheless it has grown very popular-just not in the UK).

I think Reprobate's points are interesting, particularly about the stretcher -so hilarious and true! I keep seeing them go down with these agonizing looks on their faces-and then, poof! there they are, back on the field, fit as a fiddle! Puh-leeze! (That last bit is consistent with my "sissy" perception).
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:22 AM
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I think the biggest problem has been pointed out: 45 minutes with no commercials. It's difficult to get a network to pick up the games because of that.

I think soccer is going to catch on in the US. So many kids are playing it. My dad, a person that never watches any sport (or even TV for that matter), just signed up for cable specifically so he could watch the World Cup games with my younger sister and brother.

My younger siblings started playing soccer when they were in elementary school, and they love it. They're both watching the World Cup games.

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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:31 AM
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I always thought it didn't catch on because it was boring, but then along came nascar.....
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:32 AM
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I live in Jamaica and let me tell you...football fever is pretty high right now. Almost in every workplace a tv is on showing the matches! I can literally walk down the street and not miss one minute of the game.

The same goes for cricket <i> challicewell </i>. America has never caught the cricket fever like the rest of the world. I wonder why that one is?
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 09:45 AM
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Lots of countries have sports that they go crazy over that are not enjoyed elsewhere in the world not just the US. As posted earlier, Australia has its version of football, Ireland has hurling and Irish football, cricket is enjoyed by relatively few countries, so why the US bashing. I would wager that China is not going crazy over soccer - any mention of that in the Economist? And didn't basketball originate in the US and isn't it enjoyed in many Eastern European countries as well as Asia? To say it hasn't been exported well is incorrect - just look at the roster of any NBA team and I'll bet you'll find Eastern Europeans. They must be playing a lot of basketball there to make it to the &quot;pinnacle&quot; of that sport. And what are the world wide ratings for the Super Bowl - aren't they tremendous?

Seems like its okay for a portion of the world to not enjoy football, basketball or baseball but the same standard doesn't apply to the US. There must be something cynical and evil as to why we don't like professional soccer. Maybe it just doesn't export well to the US.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 10:05 AM
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Breaking News: England 2, Trini Dad &amp; Tobaggan 0 - though winning by two goals is a slaughter in soccer one wonders how a country of probably a few hundred thousand people could compete with a country (England for some reason is a country in soccer) of about 50,000,000 on the same playing field
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 10:08 AM
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I'm pretty sure this is one of those questions without an answer, but here's two theories: (1) the sport is an import and there's some inherent bias in favor of sports invented or at least &quot;perfected&quot; here, such as the aforementioned baseball, American football and basketball; (2) you can't use your hands!

Everyone likes to ponder why it is that virtually every U.S. kid plays soccer but yet nobody watches it - sometimes even when their own kid is playing! I think the fallacy there is kids are playing in organized soccer leagues run by adults, because soccer makes sense as an organized sport for kids: less equipment than most sports, and extremely simple compared to every other sport. But would American kids play soccer on their own? We'll never know because we no longer let kids play on their own - we give them gadgets to play with at home, enroll them in countless organized sports and activities, and wouldn't dream of letting them simply go to the park by themselves.

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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 10:10 AM
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Well, I’ve never minded being the “devil’s advocate,” so here goes: what is described as a “global religion” is more like global insanity. I’m not sure when it happened but sports have become something (quite a lot) more than mere entertainment and fun, becoming a train-wreck of worldwide sickness. I used to think it was only American’s who behaved that way, until I made the first of many trips to Europe, particularly England.

It is a type of tribalism, of course, for people who have no real lives or skills of their own. Becoming a fan, wearing team colors and logos allow them to become one of the “herd” of likeminded fan-attics, living vicariously through athletes instead of living their own lives.

It amazes me that, in the States, grown men (and women) idolize American football players who can barely speak legibly and probably have no writing skills other than endorsing their obscene paychecks. The vast majority of these guys are losers who will be broke and forgotten within 10 years after the end of their careers. The incidents of drug abuse, spousal abuse, and general dysfunction among these “heroes” is far above the general population.

I know men who cannot tell you, without considerable thought if at all, the date of their anniversary or the birth dates of their children yet can rattle off reams of pointless statistics about any number of their gridiron idols.

In the meantime team owners and odds-makers are earning more money on single events than the gross national product of some smaller countries.

Behavior that a generation ago would have been totally abhorrent and unacceptable has now become mainstream.

I used to think the whole obsession silly. Now I realize it is simply sad.
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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 10:22 AM
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&quot;sports have become something (quite a lot) more than mere entertainment and fun, becoming a train-wreck of worldwide sickness.&quot;

Only if you're a San Diego Padres' fan. I'd go on about the other generalizations made about sports fans and players, but I have to quit my job, drink to excess and pray to the shrine of Tony Gwynn I have in my bedroom before I watch today's game. By the way, has anyone seen my wife in the past few months?

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Old Jun 15th, 2006, 10:29 AM
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Soccer/calcio/football is the only sport I watch, not just during the WC....American football, basketball, baseball et al bore me to tears. I've watched every match of the WC so far here at home but would love to be in Europe watching it, no one I know around here gives a damn.
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