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Anyone from the US ever gone to grad school in Europe?

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Oct 19th, 2008, 07:19 AM
  #1
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Anyone from the US ever gone to grad school in Europe?

My 23 year old daughter is seriously thinking of trying to go to grad school in Europe. She wants a program that is in English but incorporates a geoscience program in the degree...ie.geology,hydrology,environmental geology,petroleum science,etc.(She received her BS in Marine Science with a concentration in Marine Geology.)
She already has a list of schools that she is interested in and will soon be applying to.
My question is has anyone gone to grad school in Europe and what were your experiences? Thanks!
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Oct 19th, 2008, 07:38 AM
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One of my cousin's boyfriends went to med school in Hanover,Germany (it wasn't in English though) because they offered him free med school. He didn't really like it.

There are some grad school forums, but they are probably more geared towards getting into US schools. You can see the offers($'s) that students are getting in particular fields at Grad Cafe. Lonely Planet might be another good website to post some questions since it attracts that age group.
http://forum.thegradcafe.com/
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Oct 19th, 2008, 08:55 AM
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Our daughter got a masters from Trinity in Dublin. She enjoyed it very much, but she also learned how to drink beer and gained 30 lbs.
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Oct 19th, 2008, 09:07 AM
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>She wants a program that is in English but incorporates a geoscience program in the degree...ie.geology,hydrology,environmental geology,petroleum science,etc.

What do you mean witha grad program? PhD?

If yes, at least in Germany and Switzerland you don't have "programs" with specified language. You join a resarch group, may have additional requirements (seminars, prsentations, teaching etc.) and finish by writing your thesis and presenting/defending it.

In environmental geology and hydrology my absolute recommendation would by the hydrological/environmental science institute of the ETH Zürich.
http://www.erdw.ethz.ch/index_EN

Petroleum engineering is not as prominent in Germany and Switzerland but I would expect a lot on offer in Netherlands.
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Oct 19th, 2008, 09:56 AM
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She is going for her master's degree.

Bob-your daughter's weight gain reminded me of my own while going to Wisconsin!
Keep the thoughts coming as I appreciate any input.
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Oct 19th, 2008, 10:45 AM
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I got a master's at a Scottish university many years ago. I stayed on for several years after that, later teaching at a rival uni in Glasgow.

Of course it will be life-changing, but frankly with communications and transport in their current conditions, I wouldn't overestimate the impact studying overseas will have. It's a longer plane ride than going to postgraduate school in North America, and if she possesses sufficient time and funds, supplemental travel to other parts of Europe or the middle east is pretty easy. But the world is so cosmopolitan nowadays the edge overseas study may have held once is lessened (IMO.)

I would suggest exercising extra caution in selecting a setting and course. Not all European universities are created equal (duh) and in fact some have big hats and few cattle, if you get my meaning. Good luck to her.
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Oct 19th, 2008, 10:56 AM
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The european system doesn't do masters and doctorate degrees in the same way that the US does. There are different systems in different countries - and unless she is totally fluent in a foreign language she will be limited to the UK or Ireland (for programs in English).

If she is already 23 has she taken some time off to work? So she doesn't have a university counseling office that can help her locate programs that might fit her needs?

The daughter of one of my cousins went to the UK for an advanced degree in classics. The program was extremely rigorous (compared to her US school - which was OK but not Ivy) and she ended up with a doctorate (after her thesis). Not sure if a masters was an option.

But - she was a brilliant scholar - went through college her in 3 years on full scholarship with all top grades and summa cum, special honors socirty etc.
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Oct 19th, 2008, 11:27 AM
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It is not true that she is limited to UK and Ireland, other countries offer degrees in English also.
No idea what is available in the Netherlands for her though - until recently a Masters degree did not exist here - now it is what nearly all University students are awarded at the end of their 4 year study. They get the Bachelor after 2-3 years, but traditionally courses here are at least 4 years.
Having said all that for most of her subjects she would probably stand more chance of finding a suitable study in the UK.
Do let us know where she applies and what she decides!
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Oct 19th, 2008, 11:54 AM
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>>>>>
and unless she is totally fluent in a foreign language she will be limited to the UK or Ireland (for programs in English).
>>>>>>

this is simply not true, especially for graduate degrees. i have no idea why anybody would say this as it is a very bizarre assumption. many european unis offer programmes taught in english. just as one example, the NL has many, many such programmes. how do you think continental unis attract top students and instructors from abroad???

do you think that, for example, all unis in NL, sweden, and denmark make every foreign student learn their provincial languages before they can study or teach in the country? if that were the case, continental unis would be very insular and not very interesting places for anybody to study...especially for the natives. and other countries more common languages like germany and france also have many english language graduate programmes.
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