Anyone Familiar With Uber Taxis in Rome

Jan 19th, 2015, 03:33 PM
  #1  
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Anyone Familiar With Uber Taxis in Rome

I am assisting some friends plan their week's visit to Rome. I am looking at options for transportation traveling to the different areas of Rome. They do not want to take the busses so I am looking for suggestions for other options. I have been told that Uber has taxis in Rome and most of the recommendations I have seen are positive and less expensive than the Rome taxis. I would appreciate any info on Uber taxis and info on using the Rome taxis. We used the Rome taxis a few times when we were in Rome w/ no problems. Thanks so much!
Luv2travel15 is offline  
Jan 19th, 2015, 03:51 PM
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Licensed taxis in Rome are not expensive, they are insured, they follow the law and they take care of their customers, and don't jack up their rates at peak times.

Do your friends have mobility issues? Do they speak Italian?
sandralist is offline  
Jan 20th, 2015, 05:33 AM
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Thanks sandralist for the info. I am familiar w/ the licensed taxis as we did use them a few times. Someone mentioned the Uber taxis so I wanted to get that info to give to my friends. I will probably advise them to use the Rome taxis as there are pros and cons on Uber taxis. It will be their decision but I was just curious as to whether anyone else used them.

This is their first trip abroad from USA so not sure whether they speak Italian. The husband does have some walking issues, cannot walk long distances (perhaps a mile and has to take a break) so just trying to give them the best options. I know that Rome is a walking city and my DH and I did so much walking.

I am also looking into info on visiting Ostia Antica and how to get there from Rome. They were interested in visiting Pompeii on a day trip from Rome but walking the ruins may be too much for the DH. Again it is their decision. Ostia Antica gets great reviews from those that have been there so thought this might be a viable option for them and traveling would be minimal within Rome. Any thoughts on this?

Thanks again.
Luv2travel15 is offline  
Jan 20th, 2015, 06:12 AM
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They should stay somewhere central and walk. Most things are not that far apart.

Do you know what their bus aversion is? I find the little electric buses very handy when I'm in Rome.

http://atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=9
kybourbon is online now  
Jan 20th, 2015, 06:13 AM
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You can get an urban train to Ostia Antica from the Porta San Paolo metro station. Follow the signs to the Ostia Lido train. You can use your bus or metro ticket on the train, as long as 100 minutes haven't transpired from when you stamped it. If I remember correctly, the stop is called "Ostia Scavi".

When you get off the train, follow the signs. You'll cross a highway on a pedestrian overpass.

The site is really remarkable, with many more layers of history than Pompeii. I've been there four times and still haven't seen all I want to see there. It's not terribly well marked, so your friends should come prepared with a good map or guide to the site. It's one place that I think a private tour would be invaluable.

Here is a good web site that has tons of information about Ostia Antica:

http://www.ostia-antica.org/

They also have their own guide you can download:

http://www.ostia-antica.org/touristguide.pdf

It has a brief history of the site, a recommended itinerary, and a map at the end.
bvlenci is online now  
Jan 20th, 2015, 06:58 AM
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I think if they cannot more than a mile without taking a break that Ostia Antica might be too much. It is at least a mile from the ticketed entrance to Ostia Antica to the major points of interest, and another 2 or 3 miles of walking to appreciate what's there and leave. I've not taken the train out there, but my recollection is that it is at least half a mile from the train station stop that I saw to the entrance to the site.

Just in general, I think your friends need to budget for taxis and they should ask their hotel to help them locate a taxi driver who speaks English, and carry the card of that taxi driver so they can call that driver when they need a taxi. Even if that driver is busy, he will call another driver to get them.

If they are willing to use the buses and trams, then they are a great option. It is not difficult to figure out the system, but it does need to be learned. However, I still recommend that they become the "client" of a specific driver because it is easy to just finally find yourself unwilling to walk another step on the cobblestoned streets of Rome, and taxis can make all the difference between happy memories and having a meltdown! (I once went to Rome with a mangled foot and using taxis and buses and trams made all the difference.)
sandralist is offline  
Jan 21st, 2015, 07:52 AM
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Thanks so much everyone for your great responses! I think that because they have not been to Europe or out of the country (USA) before trying to use/navigate the busses is a bit intimidating. I am going to look into the electric busses for them.

They were ok w/ taxis getting to points further from their hotel.

sandralist: thanks a bunch for that suggestion of getting same taxi driver - I like it! I gave them the info on using the official white taxis so they will have that w/ them. I did a quick distance check yesterday on google for the places of interest that they would like to see. The Vatican was the furthest walking point from their hotel, said 2 miles, so think that they should definitely plan a taxi (or bus) to go there. Hotel can probably arrange for them. I will check the electric bus schedule also. The Colosseum was about a mile, Trevi Fountain less than 1/2 mile so they should be ok w/ doing some walking.

bvlenci - thanks for the Ostia info. Think they can manage the train, etc. I did read that it is a walk to the sites so concerned about the walking there as well. I have Ostia on my bucket list next time we go. We've been to Pompeii and Ephesus so looking forward to Ostia.

They really want to visit Pompeii and Sorrento. I have told them about Pompeii and the uneven terrain, long distances to walk, etc. I just remember how tired we were and we didn't have walking issues. LOL

I think that a day trip from Rome might be too much but it is their trip so they have to decide what they want to do. I was thinking of an overnight in Sorrento and then do Pompeii on way back to Rome. This would give them some down time and not rushing about to catch the train, etc. Thoughts????? Alternatively, Ostia would be much easier to do.

Thanks so much everyone! It's nice to get inside everyone's brain.
Luv2travel15 is offline  
Jan 21st, 2015, 08:45 AM
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If I knew someone with some mobility/stamina problems who really wanted to see Pompei I might see if I could locate a "slow walkers" organized tour of Pompei, either as a day trip from Rome or something they could meet up with at Pompei. Part of what makes Pompei so exhausting is when people are trying to find the sights of interest on their own. Something organized might be very efficient, and if it is geared to slow walkers, no problems about taking rest breaks.

As for Ostia Antica, at the entrance to the site, right near the ticket office, there is a asphalt paved service road that goes directly to the beginning of the main sights of interest. It is much less tiring to walk that small roadway (it's like a long driveway) than to walk the ancient Roman road made of broken boulders that makes its way through the ancient cemetery to the same area. You can find online Rick Steves' suggestions for touring Ostia Antica, and I think it is well organized.

Something your friends might consider is investing in those "walking stick" portable chairs that double as canes, but basically they open out to become a small three-legged stool, which would give them a chance to sit whenever they feel like it while touring big sites like ruins or even St Peters. Having a walking stick is also simply nice for walking on uneven surfaces or up inclines. They help with stamina

http://www.everywherechair.com/sportseat-cane-seat.html
sandralist is offline  
Jan 21st, 2015, 11:18 AM
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Sandralist, thanks for those 2 tips. I will see if I can find slow walkers tour. I think the seat idea is terrific too. I will pass this suggestion along. This would certainly make it a bit easier with all the walking involved.
Luv2travel15 is offline  

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