Any advice for a couple moving to Paris?

Jun 6th, 2005, 09:39 AM
  #1  
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Any advice for a couple moving to Paris?

A close friend of mine is moving to Paris in the next week because her husband has a job there (lasting 5 months). The company is located in the 8th so they are looking for an apartment near there. They are moving from Holland.

I just thought perhaps some of the Paris experts/ residents may have some words of wisdom. The recent thread on not touching fruits and vegetables in markets is what made me think of it, and I did forward it on to her!

http://fodors.com/forums/threadselec...2&tid=34630004

I know that they are quite overwhelmed at the moment with logistical details and thought it would be nice to glean some useful tips to help them out.

Many thanks in advance!
pandaschu is offline  
Jun 6th, 2005, 09:51 AM
  #2  
ira
 
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Hi panda,

I'm reading "Almost French". The author lived with her fiance in Levallois-Perret, a suburb on the W of Paris near the end of the no. 3 line, on the RER C.

Much less expensive than living in the city.

ira is online now  
Jun 6th, 2005, 09:58 AM
  #3  
 
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[Spoiler for ira]. They don't stay in the suburbs too long. . . they move to the Sentier district (2eme) and the book offers an interesting account of setting up (and living) in a neighborhood that's in transition.

And Darth Vader is Luke Skywalker's father.
elle is offline  
Jun 6th, 2005, 09:59 AM
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There was a thread similar to the "Do not touch" one a while ago:

http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34564077
Eloise is offline  
Jun 6th, 2005, 10:04 AM
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well, if they live in Holland, they should have their own ideas about proprieties (I didn't really agree with some things on that thread or about how dire consequences are, or how common -- eg, many areas of main dept stores do not have individual sales clerks around to show things to you, it is self-service just like elsewhere).

Anyway, if they are moving in one week to a city they don't know, I think they have more important things to worry about -- like where to live. This just sounds so odd to me, though, surely this company must have someone who helps employees with such moves, don't they? Perhaps even provide housing assistance of some kind, or subsidize the rent? I notice you don't mention price (and the 8th arr is expensive), so that is why I suspect these friends may have housing allowances.

There are agencies that do this kind of thing for executives, I'd suggest they contact them, unless they have a plan, also. It's not real clear what kind of information you are looking for, if it's just little tips on Parisian life, I would suggest they read a few books on that, there are several (Almost French is good, ones Polly Platt wrote, maybe a few more in that genre). If they are moving in a week, I don't think they'll have time for reading, though.

I think a lot of these things are just common sense, and part of learning to live in a new place is your own discovery.
Christina is online now  
Jun 6th, 2005, 10:09 AM
  #6  
ira
 
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Hi elle,

>They don't stay in the suburbs too long. . . they move to the Sentier district (2eme)....<

Gee, I thought that Levallois sounded very nice.


ira is online now  
Jun 6th, 2005, 10:14 AM
  #7  
 
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IF all their relocation worries are taken care of (more or less) for transferees as Christina suggests... another thing you might have your friends check for is a "Culture Shock - Paris"... otherwise, is your friend is an American I understand there are some clubs for ex-pat American "wives", sort of a "welcome wagon" sort of thing. That's an idea that may be "googled"
SuzieC is offline  
Jun 6th, 2005, 10:58 AM
  #8  
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Many apologies, I should have been more specific.

Indeed, finding a place to live is paramount, and they do have very little time. Thats just why I was trying to help with the lighter side of life in a new city. The advice thus far has been fab- thanks!

pandaschu is offline  
Jun 6th, 2005, 12:11 PM
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Send them over to the bonjourparis.com site and have them look in the forums for "Living and Working in Paris." Many, many good tips from ex-pats.
Underhill is offline  
Jun 6th, 2005, 01:46 PM
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Gosh, they live in Holland so they know the rules about touching the fruit, nee? They are just up the road from Paris so they must have been there several times at least. I lived in Haarlem and could drive to Paris in 5 hours. I also lived in Paris. The biggest difference is the language. Your friend should learn some words and learn how to pronounce them. Everything else will take care of itself, with enough time and money and frustration.

hopscotch is offline  
Jun 6th, 2005, 03:41 PM
  #11  
 
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As a going-away present you could get your friend a copy of Polly Platt's excellent book "French or Foe," all about French culture and customs. The most basic is that on entering a store one always says "Bonjour, madame (or monsieur). Platt's book will fill your friend in on the rest and make her life much, much easier in terms of transition.
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