Americans in Europe

Aug 21st, 2000, 10:53 AM
  #41  
Jen
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I think what this all boils down to is that Rachel needs 10 pints and a good shagging.
 
Aug 21st, 2000, 01:29 PM
  #42  
kavey
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Al, I was not at all maintaining that the Kennedy's economic wealth is based on political positions, what I was pointing out was the way they are treated and worshipped by the american people. The cult of the Kennedy's or of the president too for that matter, is not dissimilar to what many older and some younger europeans feel towards royalty.

It was an effort to point out to Steve that although Americans might not officially have royalty on the tax books, their concepts of class have not disappeared.

What is White Trash if not a reference from one american to another of lower status?

As for the Kennedy's, hey I am not knocking them. If I could live the life they do (minus some of the raping and pillaging) and in the houses they own, I would JUMP at it...!!!

 
Aug 21st, 2000, 03:35 PM
  #43  
Josée
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Fiou ! (That's French for Phew !)
From my Canadian (French speaking Canadian = francophone, a Québécoise in my case) observatory,it is really fun to watch the friendly duel between my big and jovial neighboors (les Américains) and my distant mysterious cousins (mainly the French for my personal history...) I have been in California, Massachusets, Florida, Louisiana, New York etc.... as much as I have been in France, Belgique und Deutchland... I LOVE YOU BOTH GUYS, SO COME AND VISIT BEAUTIFUL QUÉBEC, FOR A GOOD MIX OF EUROPEAN FLAVOR IN A NORTH AMERICAN ENVIRONMENT. Nope, I'm not a travel agency, it just seems like a perfect adding for this thread.... Salut !
 
Aug 21st, 2000, 04:15 PM
  #44  
Why
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Here's an idea about why Americans try so hard to dress right and fit in while in Europe. Most American tourists visiting Europe are whites, I would guess. Whites are the majority in the States, and are therefore not used to standing out wherever they happen to be. So when in Europe, they wish to dress in a way to fit in so that they will not stand out, because standing out makes them feel uncomfortable.

I know, you'll all probably ridicule this idea. But, white folks, have you ever been in a room full of people of another race? If so, did you feel a little different? Food for thought.
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 04:12 AM
  #45  
Falcon
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Foreigners everywhere can be stereotyped. I don't think Americans are treated any better or worse in Europe than in other foreign places. My two sense in respect of the anti-Americanism Dave mentions from:
a) those "oh Europe is so much better than the US" americans is sort of snob value by trying to act big or simply impress the rest of us by showing that they are so much more cultured/educated among us. I get the same feeling from guys who prefer to drink wine instead of beer.
b) , europeans who show anti-American feeling have a more subtle reason I think. Whether it is because they needed us to save them their many wars (not just world wars but their colonial wars too) or whether it is jealousy as we are wealthier than them or both, I think it's a way of overcoming this complex of inferiority by getting back at us by making out we are lacking in culture etc.
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 04:27 AM
  #46  
Santa Chiara
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Falcon,
You are much to0 humble and self-effacing. I am sure Europeans also envy your elegant writing style, astonishing grasp of complex historical events and impeccable use of grammar.
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 04:29 AM
  #47  
Santa Chiara
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Well, of course, I meant "too," she grumbled, scurrying back to the work at hand.
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 04:42 AM
  #48  
Michelle
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Santa Chiara: I too am stunned at Falcon's sense of history, to say nothing of his belief that Europeans may have evolved enough to have achieved psychological hang ups such as envy and feelings of inferiority. I have to say this board is incredibly entertaining.
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 07:02 AM
  #49  
love2trvl
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Hi,
I have always been treated with respect while traveling in Europe for one reason. I am respectful. I dress neat and clean. (Though I try to wear my white sneakers occassionally) I am an American and very proud of that fact. But I love being a tourist especially in Europe. Because I sometimes look like I am lost, I have had people come up to me and offer directions and are happy to do it. I have found some wonderful restaurant recommendations that way!
Every country has rude and self- centered people. Just go where you want, enjoy the sights, be respectful and you will have a great time.

Hey Al: Thanks!
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 11:08 AM
  #50  
SharonM
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Oh my my , Falcon...
Are you LISTENING to yourself???
<..."I think it's a way of overcoming this complex of inferiority by getting back at us by making out we are lacking in culture etc.">
Uh huh...wonder where they got THAT idea...bet they are just writhing with envy right now at such eloquence...
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 01:33 PM
  #51  
Florence
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Just met 2 American tourists tonight in Geneva: fannypacks, shorts, sandals, looking at a map, grateful that someone spotted them as tourists and showed them the directions to their hotel ... Invited them for a drink in my favorite bistrot. Had a good laugh over this thread with resident American friends. Wish you all good time in Europe.
 
Aug 22nd, 2000, 02:39 PM
  #52  
rand
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OK, which of you put her up to it? This is much shortened from today's paper. Recently, one of the first customers of the day paid for her cappuccino with $5US. After the exchange was calculated, the correct change was given in Canadian coin. On realizing it was Canadian coin, she demanded it be converted into US........At this point the woman flew into a performance worthy of a Greek tragedy. Her life was over. She was never returning to Canada, wailed the woman, who at one point was actually down on her hands and knees......The woman got her American money back, but also poured her cappuccino over a table. This is only one of over two million Americans who visits Victoria each year, but she is the one who makes the paper.
 
Aug 25th, 2000, 08:17 AM
  #53  
Yorkshire
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I love meeting US Citizens here in the UK. I always find them to be enthusuastic, willing to be pleased, grateful for any help, and very courteous and friendy. I always try to help when I can, and I hope they are as nice to me in the US when I visit them (which I am loking forward to doing). Keep coming, guys, it's always a pleasure to meet you, and you're very welcome. (It would be nice if more of you came to the North of England for a few days, not just for a half-day trip to York....).

We DO poke fun at you, because we English DO have a sense of humour - but I hope you've noticed (perhaps on some of our TV programmes that you get over there) that we take the p**s out of ourselves, too. It's a bit too easy to take the mickey out of stereotypes, and perhaps you don't always realise how often you really DO conform to the stereotype. (I hate to think what a stereotype Englishman is in the US, I'm probalby only too like one, but at least I don't talk like Dick Van Dyke !)

We often are rather amazed at how little you have bothered to find out about us before you come here (but most English are even worse when they go for a boozy two weeks in Spain, believe me). I have really heard US citizens talking about the UK as though it was part of the US, and apparently really believing that the US Constitution (eg "The 1st Amendment") applies here.

What do other people who live in North America (Mexicans, Canadians), and anyone from Centra or South America think about people from the US using the word "American" to mean just the US ? It's like English people suddenly deciding that from now on "British" will not include Scots or Welsh.

Well, that's off my chest - sorry to sound pompous - keep coming, you're very welcome.

Yorkshire
 
Aug 25th, 2000, 08:38 AM
  #54  
kk
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How nice. Thank you, Yorkshire. And, as a matter of fact, I do plan to go to York on my next visit to England.

Your story, Rand, reminds me of a time when my traveling companion went up to a US businessman in the Singapore airport who was behaving as that woman in your story did, about getting US change. He said to the irate businessman, look, you are in someone else's country, you are creating a scene, you are making us Americans look bad. The businessman actually calmed down, took his change in native money, and slunk away. Sounds as if this woman in Canada wouldn't have been tamed, though. Also sounds as if her medication wasn't properly adjsuted!
 
Aug 25th, 2000, 08:56 AM
  #55  
marilyn
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This forum is so entertaining, plus you get to learn lots of good stuff. Actually, I think we are called Americans because the name of our country is "United States of America." Hard to figure what else we could be called from that, and I'm pretty sure citizens of other countries on the two American continents are comfortable with calling US citizens "Americans" or "Americanos," while they can be described as Canadian, Venezuelan, etc. Some of it is just usage: I notice you are "English," but I think lots of people DO use "British" to mean just English, because the others are Scots or Welsh. I don't think I've ever heard a Scot refer to himself as "British," but my experience is limited!
 
Aug 26th, 2000, 04:21 AM
  #56  
Michael
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Just a couple of comments. The truly intelligent people of this world, regardless of country or heritage, are those who are genuinely humble, compassionate, gracious, courteous, respectful, and friendly to other people, wherever they might be, at home or elsewhere. They are shining examples of realized, fulfilled potential. Unfortunately, they are far more the exception rather than the rule. Just imagine how much better the world could be for mankind and all other life on earth, since the vast majority of people have that same potential!
 
Aug 26th, 2000, 02:15 PM
  #57  
Steve
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Does anyone know the most efficient way to get from Morocco to Crete without going through a huge hub in Europe?? Thank for any help.
 
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