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Americans and Canadians, leave your tipping practices at home

Americans and Canadians, leave your tipping practices at home

Jun 23rd, 2012, 09:47 AM
  #41  
 
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AlessandraZoe is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 09:50 AM
  #42  
 
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I'm reaching back in my mind, ah yes...

I tip
my lawyer,
the aircraft pilot,
the customs officers,
the check in staff (except Ryanair where it an enforced extra), the trolly dollies,
I make a note to send a tip to the star of the movie I watched on the flight over,
the taxi driver,
the hotel check in staff,
I mail a tip to the TV news reporter who I watched for ten minutes.
I leave a tip in my hotel room and I tip the breakfast staff.
I also send a small message to the weather forecaster who told me it was going to be fine even though it's chucking it down.

What do they say, when visiting a foreign place "take nothing but photos and leave nothing but memories".

"I don't care I'll ignore local culture and do it my way because I'm.... big"... heard it in the playground, stop it now.

Looking forward to the 2013 season.
bilboburgler is online now  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 09:52 AM
  #43  
 
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I tip the Fodorites who give such useful advice on tipping.
Weegie is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 09:55 AM
  #44  
 
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Tipping 20% in Europe does make you look a bit,, hmm, what is the word, "stupid" maybe? They sure will like you though, they are rubbing their hands in glee... but they know as most locals know, that that tipping practice is not Europeon but an American habit brought with you. Tippping 15% make you more Canadian, and tipping 5% makes you more local,, lol Ok this is just joking around.. but I do understand some Americans really do not understand that the service workers are paid differently in Europe, not the pathetic slave wages of American( in some states they actually have minimum wages of 3 dollars an hour for waiters!!) this is because the American public has been trained to accept paying the employees living wages so that the restaurant owners don't have to.

Regarding tipping "Madame PiPi"
I feel like starting another thread on that, its not just tipping, in some places you are actaully "paying" a wage as free standing washrooms ( like on the grounds of some chateuas in France) are actually "concessions" the people running them pay the site a fee to lease them, then they are responsible for cleaning and running them.
justineparis is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 10:07 AM
  #45  
 
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In Scotland we only tip flies.
belted_galloway is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 10:09 AM
  #46  
 
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>In Scotland we only tip flies.<

But we fine you if you do. So Yanks beware, no flytipping!
Weegie is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 10:20 AM
  #47  
 
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>If you have never been to Europe or haven't been in a while and forgot, you don't tip as you are required to back home<

This is such a silly posting on a forum where the majority of long-time participants are either European by birth, live in Europe, have second homes in Europe, or travel to Europe 2-3 times a year.

Thin
Pepper_von_snoot is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 10:24 AM
  #48  
 
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Adrienne, minimum wage is different in overseas departments like Martinique, Guadeloupe or Mayotte.
kerouac is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 11:09 AM
  #49  
 
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But Pep, I was so expecting your input on Tipping Police attire!
AlessandraZoe is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 11:19 AM
  #50  
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"I tip
my lawyer..." You laugh but I am pretty sure that in Canada you pay a tax on legal fees. I could be wrong on that but I know for a fact that you do pay a tax on a realtor's commission when you sell property. So maybe a tip should be offered to a lawyer.
travelme is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 11:19 AM
  #51  
 
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Agree with Thin .
danon is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 11:40 AM
  #52  
 
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Sorry I tip cab drivers - but not the 20% I would at home - bellman who haul luggage around, and in restaurants - again not the 20% as at home - and not much where it says service included. And if I get special service in a hotel - different pillow or extra towels or whatever I tip for those too. IMHO when you use people's time for something extra you should compensate them.

As for tip jars in self service places - I don't use them in either the US or elsewhere.
nytraveler is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 11:44 AM
  #53  
 
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people's time for something extra

Maybe if you force them to work overtime! Otherwise, catering to you or catering to somebody else is all the same to them, unless your objective is to make sure that you get better service at the expense of somebody else who might not get good service because you need the chambermaid to massage your feet.
kerouac is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 11:54 AM
  #54  
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" This is such a silly posting on a forum where the majority of long-time participants are either European by birth, live in Europe, have second homes in Europe, or travel to Europe 2-3 times a year."
Perhaps this is true for those so fortunate but it is by no means uncommon to read about first time travelers to Europe and this information could be useful to them. This might shock you but not all of us have the luxury of traveling to Europe 2-3 times a year.
travelme is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 12:31 PM
  #55  
 
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I don't understand the apparent reluctance to tip the chambermaid, who often has a thankless job but does much to make one's stay pleasant. Is it because she is out of sight, out of mind?

I'd much rather leave a euro or two on the pillow than in a tip jar at a Starbucks.
29FEB is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 12:36 PM
  #56  
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I do agree with 29Feb and I do tip chambermaids wherever I go.
travelme is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 12:41 PM
  #57  
 
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Canadians are told to tip in Europe even if we don't buy any goods or services. So I tip cab drivers in Europe even if we don't take a cab. Same with that gellato stuff. Leave a euro on the tray as we pass by.

Sounds like we got bad advice.
colduphere is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 12:44 PM
  #58  
 
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I work completely out of the public eye, and I do a good job. Please send me some tips, too.
kerouac is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 12:52 PM
  #59  
 
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I dont work but have a tip for the 3:30 at Newmarket next week. Send money now!
Weegie is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2012, 01:05 PM
  #60  
 
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"this information could be useful to them"

Actually, I don't think so.

There are large and small general variations in tipping practice in each country, and there are large and small tipping tendency variations among individuals. Sweeping generalizations just don't work.

I have a friend here in the US who will tell me that she would NEVER consider tipping more than 10% at a US restaurant--and she adds a little "sniff" when she says that. When a group of us go out, we make sure she isn't in charge of the bill. We'd never be able to show our faces--or eat our soup--again.

Perhaps she's posting here. No one would know her authority level is zip.

Then I have another friend who does 25%* regularly. Sorry, I'm not going there. Yet I'm sure there are people on this forum who think that would be appropriate.

So before I take anyone's advice on tipping, I want to see if he's ever ponied up for his round of drinks--or is he conveniently in the loo.

*My exception to this 25% thing: I'll tip at least 25% if I've taken table space for an hour or so at breakfast while chewing the fat with friends. The meal itself is usually cheap in the US and so the extra % for me is actually very little; however, the financial impact of sitting there without ordering anything else and getting endless coffee refills can have huge negative impact for that specific waitstaff shift.
AlessandraZoe is offline  

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