American seeking work in Paris

Old Jan 12th, 2008, 04:09 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 707
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Bookmark
KL467 is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 05:30 AM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,705
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
>>>You would have to speak British English? What on earth does that mean?<<<

I am guessing that he was applying for a teaching job. It used to be a norm in Scandinavia to teach British English pronounciation.
elina is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 08:30 AM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 22,707
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
According to statistics (which I haven't looked for recently), about 75% of Americans living abroad do not pay US income taxes and most of them do not pay as a conscious refusal. There is a very big lobby that has protected these people from prosecution or some other dire fate so far, because the US needs these people -- they are ambassadors of the US in every country of the world, and just being there is good publicity for the country (well, most of the time).

Whenever the subject of a crackdown comes up in the International Herald Tribune, you will see the expats go absolutely WILD.

The small percentage of overseas Americans working for American firms perhaps do not have a choice.
kerouac is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 09:54 AM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,755
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
..I have lived abroad. When I did so I was working aboad and did not pay US income taxes. I, however, filed every year. I payed income taxes in my country of residence. I had to submit this record to the US (actually my accountant did so dont ask for details). I wish I had been able to pay at a US tax rate as it would have been cheaper. It is really important to file so when you return you are up to date..Oh, and the easiest way to work in paris..marry French citizen though there is still a lot of red tape.
travelbunny is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 10:33 AM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 26,709
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"75% of Americans living abroad do not pay US income taxes and most of them do not pay as a conscious refusal."

Then those who do not pay as a conscious refusal are idiots. With the exception of retirees and those living in low-tax countries (the Middle East, for example) they will likely have not tax due in the US anyway. To not file just risks too much just to save aggravation and filing/preparation costs.

If one ever wants to return to the US, I would strongly recommend against not filing.
travelgourmet is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 11:03 AM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 93
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
As someone who is also in the social work field, I can say that it is possible to get a job as a child welfare worker in Great Britain, where there apparently is a shortage (or at least it was possible two or three years ago, when I saw a post from an alumni of my school on this topic). Admittedly, GB is not France, but at least it is close enough to make trips to France easy, and of course the British get far more vacation time than do we in the US!
RoadCrazy is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 12:32 PM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,667
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
>>>>>
"75% of Americans living abroad do not pay US income taxes and most of them do not pay as a conscious refusal."
...
because the US needs these people -- they are ambassadors of the US in every country of the world, and just being there is good publicity for the country
>>>>>

'conscious refusal' or they fall under the income exclusion threshold. i suggest the latter (although much less dramatic a statement).

i think that few tax collection agencies would decide not to enforce tax laws for some people because they feel they are more needed than others....and, if they did, it is hard to believe that expats would be at the top of the most needed list anyway. maybe US tax authorities also give doctors and firemen a break also because they are needed? if certain tax evasion cases are not pursued, i would suggest that it is because of low value and high collection cost.

you are in fantasy land again.
walkinaround is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 12:42 PM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,407
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
'It is possible to get a job as a child welfare worker in Great Britain, where there apparently is a shortage.'

There is a shortage because it's a job few people want to do as pay and working conditions are so poor. If you come over, you are likely to be working in very socially deprived areas like parts of inner London with high drug dependency, domestic violence, child neglect and cruelty. And living costs in the capital are so high that you are left with little travel money in spite of longer holidays.
Alec is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 12:59 PM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 22,707
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
Here is one of the lobby sites: http://www.aca.ch/op5a.htm
kerouac is offline  
Old Jan 12th, 2008, 01:03 PM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 22,707
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
And here is a wiki on the same subject: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tax_evasion
kerouac is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 12:37 AM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 26,709
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
kerouac: Neither of those links seem to provide evidence that large numbers of US citizens living abroad consciously refuse to pay any US tax liability they may have.

Famously, there have been some who have renounced their US citizenship to avoid taxes. Ireland, for a while would let the super rich basically "buy" citizenship. However, renouncing your US citizenship is not necessarily enough to avoid paying taxes and, as such, many of those that have done this risk arrest if they enter the US. Similarly, any temporary ex-Pat will likely face penalties upon return if they fail to file.

As I said, one can do this, but it is not a smart move.
travelgourmet is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 03:32 AM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,667
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
As TG says, your links do nothing to prove your far fetched theories. i can probably find an anti-tax website from citizens of about every country in the world and for hundreds of different taxpayer groups within each country. so what?

the lobbies that you talk about try to influence the law, they do not rush to protect anyone who might be prosecuted for tax evasion. americans that live outside of the country (esp non-military) have little political power. your self importance has reached new heights if you see yourself as a vital ambassador for your country that can avoid your tax liability with a wink and a nod from your internal revenue service. very bizarre ideas.

aside from the visa issues, the OP needs to consider the employment practices in the latin countries like france. if you are not familiar with this, you might be shocked at how things really work. of course, the more international a company you work for, the more professional the employment practices will be but it still will not be like the more advanced and progressive business environments (e.g. northern europe, america and canada).
walkinaround is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 06:38 AM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,755
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
..to go back to the initial question and to get off the issue of taxes- the one very easy way to spend time in Paris is to arrange a sabbatical. Unfortunately, you usually have to be a tenured professor. However, excellent graduate students can carry traveling grants and work in someones lab for a year or 2. High school level teachers (usually at independent schools) can do an exchange too.
travelbunny is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 06:58 AM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 22,707
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
<<your far fetched theories>>

They're not my theories for one thing, and I absolutely do not care whether Americans pay taxes or not, although I think they should pay as much as possible to finance their war in Iraq.

In terms of my own experience, I have not paid US taxes since 1972, yet the US embassy happily renews my passport whenever I want and has even told me that they wish more American were like me, because my Paris address is registered with them, unlike most people apparently. My tax situation has never been an issue, as the IRS and the State Department are forbidden from exchanging information.

Happy travels.

kerouac is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 07:15 AM
  #35  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 2,121
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Go to work for a multinational company with extensive operations in France, and then wrangle a transfer. That's by far the easiest way to move to France because everything is taken care of, and you're well paid. The only drawback is that it is normally temporary (a few years), unless you further negotiate a permanent position during your stay (be prepared to starve if you go that route).
AnthonyGA is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 07:47 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,229
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
It's not really about paying taxes to the US, while you're in Paris. The requirement is to make your declaration.

Since most countries I worked, I would pay more taxes to them, than what the US IRS wanted. I could use the tax credits and there was even some leftover.

So, as Kerouac said " I have not paid US taxes since 1972", yet what is required to make a declaration. It's not the same thing.

And, for MaCRo_Francophile, the French taxes will expect to see your tax forms yearly in Paris too.

My sister-in-law was legally living and can be work in Paris. She wanted to work being a doctor. She's French Canadian and is a medical doctor from a Quebec but this doesn't allow to work in France.

"Social work and psychology are my fields. Not fluent in French (yet?!?), but years of studying it have given me a broad base to build on if I can GET over there!! "

Credentials required from France.

Blackduff


blackduff is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 07:50 AM
  #37  
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,000
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts

AnthonyGA's formula worked for me twice. To say everything is taken care of, and you're well paid is an understatement. Moving expenses, home rental, utilities, automobile, insurance, tax equalization, annual home leave, etc., etc., can be included if you are valuable enough. I scored a couple of sweet deals. One of them was very sweet. Plus, if you are with the right company you receive something approaching the European size vacations!!

hopscotch is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 07:51 AM
  #38  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,998
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Read George Orwell...Down and Out in Paris!
GSteed is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 09:05 AM
  #39  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 9
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I blink, and two days have gone by and you folks are at it again! Lively Fodor's debate sparking interesting and controversial discussion.

You have my appreciation for sharing your experiences. I could not have learned this much from a book!
MaCRo_Francophile is offline  
Old Jan 13th, 2008, 09:06 AM
  #40  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 34,198
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I think the idea of working for a multinational company who will post you to Paris is great -- but likelihood about zero for someone with a social work/psychology background who does not work for such a company, already. That would be a prime posting and wouldn't go to beginners, either. My French-Canadian friend did work for such a firm and they still rescinded the offer due to economic downturns, but certainly it is possible in certain fields. I knew someone who worked for an American consulting firm that has offices on the Champs-Elysees (Andersen), although I don't know if they are still there, and another for a software company that also has offices in France.

Frankly, I think any American who is likely to work in France, or for such a company, wouldn't be posting on Fodors asking naive questions about how one can work in Paris without even mentioning skills or credentials or their current experience, or whether they even have a job.
Christina is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:36 PM.