After landing in FCO, what now?

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Jan 19th, 2015, 09:20 AM
  #1
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After landing in FCO, what now?

Hello -

As with my other post, I am trying to create a set of instructions for myself in terms of transportation when my husband and I get to Europe.

This post right now is about our trip to Rome. Is it safe to say that when we land in FCO, the next step is to take a cab to Piazza Navona?

I found link to terravision and apparently they have a bus service from FCO airport to Termini. This seems doable but from Termini, do we have to take a cab or is there a subway line in there somewhere?

Thanks a bunch!
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Jan 19th, 2015, 09:38 AM
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Do you have a guidebook? It already has a set of instructions for how to move around, from airports and inside cities.
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Jan 19th, 2015, 09:45 AM
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There is no subway station around Piazza Navona. Just take a look at the transit map: http://www.atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=3

There are buses, but that can get either complicated or thrilling like bus #64 "Heaven to Hell express" pickpocket-heaven, than is. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/ho...bus-rides.html

Stick with the cab, the official ROME cab. Reject any "good deal" offers by people approaching you. Use only the official taxi queue. There should be a queue for people using this fixed price reliable cabs. NOT all the taxis are Rome cabs. Look at the car, see the "ROMA" sticker on the door? http://www.roninrome.com/wp-content/...3/img-3575.jpg Only Roma cab offer fixed price fare to inside the wall where Piazza Novona is. I always ask for a price before getting on. Honest cab drivers always tell you the fixed price, in case of FCO to Rome, or approximate prices if on meter. The fare to Rome is fixed by the city at €48. http://www.adr.it/web/aeroporti-di-r...-/pax-fco-taxi "from- to Fiumicino Airport-Aurelian Walls"

There are also prearranged private transports.
greg is online now  
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Jan 19th, 2015, 12:40 PM
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Thanks so much Greg! Will stick with cab then. We were weighing the bus option to save a few bucks, but this tip about Heaven to Hell express is an eye-opener. Thank you!
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Jan 19th, 2015, 01:08 PM
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For taxi from Roma Termini, use the big taxi queue at the front of Termini facing the huge square with "taxi" sign with long line of people. I don't like the "taxi" queue next to track #24 and Tourist Info office. Even though it says "taxi", the guys there were evasive when asked about approximate price to my hotel. I said no thank you and used the main taxi stand at the front of the station. The driver was more than happy to give me an estimate that matched what my hotel told me would cost.
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Jan 19th, 2015, 03:22 PM
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When I go to that area, I prefer to take the FL1 train to Trastevere station, instead of the Leonardo Express to Termini station. The train is cheaper (€8 instead of €14) and the taxi ride is cheaper, because Trastever is closer to Piazza Navona than Termini is. Also, the taxi drivers at Trastevere station are not as fixated on ripping off tourists. I don't think I've ever seen any phony taxi drivers there. However, I usually don't take a taxi; I take the number 8 tram to the second stop after crossing the river (I don't know the name of the stop), and walk from there. Unless you travel light and know the city pretty well, it's best to take a taxi.
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Jan 19th, 2015, 03:23 PM
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Why not pre-arrange a limo driver pickup at FCO and transport to Piazza Navona? This would ensure that a driver will be there to pick you up and you would know the exact amount of the trip. I am helping a friend w/ their trip to Rome and suggested they arrange a pickup prior to their trip. I am recommending Stefano Constantino of Rome Cabs as he has an excellent reputation, is reliable, etc. Worth an email or look at his website to get the info.

http://www.romecabs.com

You can make the booking right on his website if you wish. Looks like it will be E50. for the trip w/ luggage. Check out his reviews.
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Jan 19th, 2015, 05:19 PM
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I second rome cabs--great service without the taxi line. We used them twice in Rome and will use them when we return in the Spring.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 04:39 AM
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The hellish reputation of the number 64 bus is greatly exaggerated. I use it frequently, and have never had a problem there. It's the most convenient line between Termini station and the Vatican, so it's usually full of tourists, but it's no more risky than any other crowded place full of tourists. Statistically, there is a bigger risk at metro stations near Termini station, such as Repubblica and Cavour. (The metro stations at Termini are slightly less risky, maybe because of the large police presence.) St. Peter's Square, during the Angelus prayer or at the general audience is another very risky spot.

The problem with the hype about the number 64 bus is that it makes people feel as though they'll be relatively safe from pickpockets if they stay away from the number 64 bus. It's just not true. You need to be careful and vigilant in any crowded place. This is true in all the touristic cities of Europe, not just Rome, which is actually only in the middle of the pack as far as petty crime directed at tourists.

There are some easy prevention measures to take to lessen your chances of having a pocket picked.

Do not carry anything valuable in pockets. Even a front pocket isn't safe from a skillful thief. The only safe pocket is inside a jacket that's kept closed. If it's too warm for a jacket, and you don't have another type of bag, use a pouch that can be worn around your waist, inside your slacks.

The best type of bag has a cross-shoulder strap, a zippered or velcro closing, and a flap over the zipper. Wear it slung across your shoulder, with bag high up (not flapping around at hip level), the flap towards your body, and your arm clasped on top of the flap. Keep things separated even inside the bag. Some people keep their credit cards and cash loose in the bottom of the bag, so that should a thief get past your defenses, he won't have time to scoop up much. The most valuable things should be in an inside hidden or zippered pocket. You don't need any special theft-resistant bag. Slashing of bags is very rare in Rome. There are so many people walking around with wallets in back pockets or inside open handbags that it's just not necessary.

A backpack or daypack is a very risky place to keep valuables, but it's a good place to keep your water, guide books, a sweater, and a small amount of money, so you won't have to pull out your wallet for small purchases. In crowded places, carry it on one shoulder, with the bag swung towards the front and your arm clamped over it.

Don't allow yourself to be distracted by anyone, not even your spouse or child, in buses or metro cars. If someone approaches you with a question or an offer of something, remain on high alert, and dispose of the matter quickly and firmly. The person may be perfectly innocent, so don't be rude unless she persists in sticking to you like a leech.

Keep a small amount of money and bus tickets in an easily accessible outside pocket of your clothing or handbag. Some thieves watch to see the spot where you put your wallet back and signal the location to an accomplice. (Be especially cautious at the ticket machines in the metro station; there is sometimes a thief at the ticket machines and an accomplice on the metro station platform.)

After passing through the metro turnstiles, walk down the track a good way, to be out of the sight lines of any thief/accomplice pair working in the metro station.

Don't rush to be the first on or off the bus or metro. Let the pushers and shovers pass ahead of you. Some of them may be deliberately trying to distract you so you don't notice a hand in your pocket.

Once aboard the bus or metro car, move as far away from the doors as possible. Most petty theft takes place in the vicinity of the doors, as the bus/metro is approaching a stop. The thief grabs and hops off in a matter of seconds.

If someone yells "thief", don't immediately feel for your wallet. It may be a ruse to flush out the hiding place of your money. Likewise putting your money in a front pocket and keeping your hand in it is just a signal to a thief of the target location. If he bumps into you, you'll probably involuntarily raise your hands to keep your balance, and bingo!

There's a well-known trick, found all over the world, where one person squirts or spills something on you, and a "sympathetic" passerby stops to help you clean up the mess, while the first person circles behind you and cleans up your possessions.

In restaurants, don't leave your bag on the ground, or hang it from the back of your chair.

If you're careful and vigilant, you can greatly minimize your chances of being the victim of a theft.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 04:53 AM
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This bus will put you within a quarter mile of Piazza Navona and runs every 30-60 minutes for 6 euro.

http://www.sitbusshuttle.com/en/fiumicino/
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Jan 20th, 2015, 05:00 AM
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My above post is not clear, this bus also goes to Termini but the first stop is Piazza Cavour (misleading called "Vatican" even though it is pretty far from there). This is the stop rather near Piazza Navona.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 05:43 AM
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Piazza Cavour is the Vatican area so not really misleading. You might be confusing it with Via Cavour which is the road by Termini that goes to the Forum. Piazza Cavour and Via Cavour are not the same area of Rome at all. Piazza Cavour is behind Castel Sant'Angelo near the Vatican (you can see the Vatican from Castel Sant'Angelo just down the block). Metro stop Cavour is across town near the Forum.

The cheapest private driver is usually Rome Shuttle Limousine (45€ for 3 people including luggage). The set taxi fee for Rome of 48€ is for 4 people including luggage.

http://www.romeshuttlelimousine.com/...t-transfer.php

Cheapest is probably Sitbusshuttle if you want to walk the rest of the way from Piazza Cavour. Another cheap option would be the local train from the airport to Trastevere (8€) and then switch to the tram (#3 - 1.50€). Be sure to validate both those tickets (train before boarding and tram on board). Getting off one stop before the end (it ends at Piazza Venezia) would put you as close to Piazza Navona as Sitbus puts you. The tram may be crowded though.

Are you actually staying Piazza Navona or somewhere nearby?
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Jan 20th, 2015, 06:47 AM
  #13
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@kybourbon - Yes we will be staying at a hotel close 0.2km from Piazza Navona.

Sitbusshuttle sounds like a good alternative to cab, and it is significantly cheaper! Thank you so much!
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Jan 20th, 2015, 10:41 AM
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Please report back how the shuttle went: timeliness, comfort (AC), methods of payment (credit card?). We will be taking it this summer.

My rather far from the Vatican comment stems from the fact that the stop is over 1 km from the Vatican so that's a hike with luggage.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 10:53 AM
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I too have read horror stories about the no 64 but the worst thing to happen to me was being berated by an elderly Italian matron who thought that I was deliberately stopping her from getting off the bus. in fact I too was trapped by the sheer numbers and in the end had to step off the bus to let her off, and then hopped back on quickly so it didn't leave without me!

Personally I'd book a car service to get to the hotel, and then investigate the options for getting back to the airport while I was there. Sometimes using public transport when you are in a completely new country, especially after an overnight flight, can be a false economy.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 12:06 PM
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Sitbusshuttle is not a shuttle as most might understand it, it is a 45 seater bus. It is almost never on time from the airport, comfort is not great (some seats are broken in some of the buses) but it is better than the competition, ac is on and freezing in the summer, you can only pay cash.
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