Activity in France: I need your advice

Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 07:53 AM
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Patisseries and viennoiseries are a different level of difficulty. The variety alone would be daunting. These are students working with a Meilleur Ouvrier de France. It would be hard to produce refined results like these in a short class.

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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 09:34 AM
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I left off my link.

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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 09:48 AM
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Did it again. If this doesn't work, I'll give up. It's not important, just fun. In case you're interested, it's on the Instagram account of Cyrille Van Der Stuyft.

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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 10:34 AM
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I think it is a great idea - if you can make it work. One of the nice aspects would be interacting with local people. Consider if it would be for adults with wine, etc. or something for families with a place for kids to play. How many people could you accommodate?
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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 11:04 AM
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St Cirq is right you should have little problem with Health Certification in Italy as long as you provide two brown paper bags , one with samples and one with e500.?

Whose talking about Italy?
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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 11:14 AM
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"It would be hard to produce refined results like these in a short class."

Doesn't matter. We're not taking this class to be ready to open a pastry shop with numerous varieties. Speaking for myself, the goal of this would be to enjoy the experience, including sampling the final result no matter how unrefined it is. That's part of the fun.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 12:42 PM
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There are pretty big differences in flours between France and the USA (and maybe other countries). So it might be important to note how to carry any learned recipes from country to country (NOT something that would be required in the "stage" the OP would have to complete to be able to offer this service).
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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 01:31 PM
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Non-genetically modified flours probably in France.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 03:04 PM
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I think it is a fine idea. Lots of people like to take cooking or baking classes when they travel.

Not me. But plenty do. I know this from hanging around on travel forums.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 08:59 PM
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I personally have encountered many people who are interested in cooking workshops. (I have a place in Nice and am there only part of the year, renting out the rest of the year). In fact, someone I know from the local Alliance Francaise who just returned from classes/workshops on macarons and viennoiserie, and took a prior course on baguettes.

Perhaps you could combine a workshop on baguettes or croissants with a market tour, to cover the time needed to proof the dough. You could return from the tour with produce to make viennoiserie or a tarte. Perhaps you could partner with a local BnB/gite for co-promotion.

There is a site called Eatwith.com (formerly known as Vizeat - un jeu de mot, based in Paris) that specifically markets to food experiences and tourism. The site mainly focuses on meals in the host's home.

I personally would be interested in the course, as long as you are not too far from the 400 bus stop.

Last edited by gooster; Apr 2nd, 2019 at 09:05 PM.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2019, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Sandrine_from_Vence View Post
Thanks a lot for all your posts which are very useful for me

I speak English, not as fluently as I used to speak years ago, but I still understand it very well. I spent 6 months in USA in the 90’s so I've improved my English!! But I don’t practice a lot in France… That’s why I would be very happy if I can speak more English… I didn’t use a translator for my 1st post (any translator, even the worst, wouldn’t write want « whant » as I did! My fingers got wrong…just like the “all” family… arrrrhhh! and may be others thinks)

To answer to tomboy, yes, the kind of flour is very important. My husband buys it in professional miller (minotier in French). You have few chances to make correct bread with the flour you buy in your local shop. Two bakers who use two different flours won’t have the same bread. Banette is one of the best flour in France (there are others as good), but you can have it only by professionals (in France, you can see the Banette logo on the baker’s door who use it). It can be the « je ne sais quoi » you’ve talked about ;-)

For the workshop I wish to create, I think our guests could discover the step of making bread, knead and bake it in our wood fired oven and at the end of the workshop, a light meal would be included (cold meat with “charcuterie” and wine testing). And everyone goes with his own bread!

We can also make socca and pizza, we often eat with friends, why not gougères, croissants or pain au chocolat (which are also made with special flour!).

So, I wanted to thank you again for all you advice and supports!

Au plaisir !
Sandrine
Hello, I've run baking workshops, and I've noticed that you want to give the illusion of baking and some stories around it, ie where does the flour come from, why only certain types of flour for traditional bread etc. The only thing that's a challenge is that making dough can be incredibly boring. So we used to show how the dough is mixed, but then work with dough that had already bulk fermented and was ready to go. Of course, the crowning moment is baking your bread and taking it from the oven and eating it. Shaping dough is always the biggest challenge. Also a thing to think of is to shape your loaves so that they don't have to bake longer than 30 minutes. With baguette and small breads that's a given, and in a good oven, pizza is ready in 3 minutes of course. Longer than about 30 minutes and the baking itself eats too much time out of your workshop format.
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