A good French to English menue book?

Mar 24th, 2003, 04:46 PM
  #1  
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A good French to English menue book?

HI,

I am off to buy a French to English dictionary that deals with food. We are going to France in June and I want to be able to translate the menue. One of my main goals is to eat well, but also to know what I am eating. Can any of you recommend such a dictionary.

Thank you,
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Mar 24th, 2003, 04:56 PM
  #2  
rex
 
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For purchase: the Marling Menu Master, acclaimed by many here (I have never actually seen one).

Or for free - - not bad, ("for the price") - - www.acena.it/dizionario.html

Best wishes,

Rex
[email protected]
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Mar 24th, 2003, 04:56 PM
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There is a great series of menu translators called "What Kind of Food Am I?" by Herbach and Dillon. I think the subtitle is Eating and Drinking in France. I have used this one and the Italy one several times and found them easy to use and very comprehensive. Have a fun trip!
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Mar 24th, 2003, 05:11 PM
  #4  
lynlor
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I have the Marling Menu-Master for France. Mine is well worn. It has served me well.
 
Mar 24th, 2003, 05:15 PM
  #5  
kjl
 
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Last year I picked up a charming
little book named, Rendez-vous with
Jill Butler. I found the book extremely
helpful with her wondeful illustrations.

I have linked her site below for your
viewing pleasure. Her book can be found
in any major bookstore.

I am off to Paris Friday!

HTH

kjl

http://www.jillbutler.com/shopping/product.cfm/BK8100
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Mar 24th, 2003, 06:10 PM
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I have a Marling menu master and I wasn't that impressed with it--and I speak some French. The problem is that the terms are broken down into menu categories, and I found quite a few that we could never find.

We just returned from a trip to Spain and I bought Open Road's Eating & Drinking in spain. I would highly recommend this series (I know they have a book on Paris which I am assuming is organized the same way). This book was much easier to use as all terms are just alphabetically arranged.
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Mar 24th, 2003, 07:07 PM
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It was our experience that any place that we wanted to eat at had a translation right on the menu. We were pretty clueless as far as reading or speaking french is concerned but we never had a bad meal! Go and have a great time!
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Mar 24th, 2003, 07:14 PM
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I disagree with the above poster. We were in many many places that did not have English menues. Maybe if you are only going to be in the well touristed parts of Paris will you find translated menues.
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Mar 24th, 2003, 07:14 PM
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yipper,

I have a Berlitz European Menu Reader. It's small and has a soft cover. Easy to carry. It isn't just French, but covers most European languages. Handy to have.

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Mar 24th, 2003, 07:21 PM
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Julies, you could be right as we stayed in the center of paris all the time. We didn't focus on learning more than the basics of french due to this. Worked out fine though.
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Mar 25th, 2003, 06:36 AM
  #11  
 
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The book BISTROS OF PARIS by R and B Hamburger not only lists bistros by district, but lists the foods of each in French and lists under each entry what the menu means in English. Very useful tho' not a dictionary. The book Eating and Drinking in Paris mentioned above is more a dictionary and also lists places to eat.
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Mar 25th, 2003, 07:06 AM
  #12  
TC
 
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Take a look at Patricia Wells, Food Lover's Guide to Paris. Lots of good information about eating, menus, translations, etc.
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Mar 25th, 2003, 09:35 AM
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I second Patricia Wells' book. I copied the food glossary and found it MUCH easier to use than the Marling.
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Mar 25th, 2003, 12:18 PM
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I will agree that the Marling Menu Master's method of organization is a bit cumbersome, but the book itself is not. It's small, with thin pages & small lettering. That way, I can easily and inobtrusively page through it at a restaurant.

It has the most complete listing of any of the menu translators that I've seen, though there are still a few local varieties of fish and similar items that aren't listed.

It's my translator of choice!
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Mar 25th, 2003, 12:24 PM
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There is one compiled by some of us on the AOL France boards some years ago that is very comprehensive and in alphabetical order. It's a 27-page Word document but you can of course play around with the formatting and print it out in smaller format. If anyone is interested, I can e-mail it as an attachment.
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Mar 25th, 2003, 03:47 PM
  #16  
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Everyone, thank you so much. Now I have a place to start and I am sure I will be able to find a book that fits my style. Now I need to spell menu correctly. I blame all my mistakes on the time of day. Anytime after 8 p.m. I can't function efficiently. I am looking forward to our trip. 3 days Paris, 4 days Nice, and we rented a gite in Provence for a week.
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Mar 25th, 2003, 04:28 PM
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StCirq: I will very much appreciate the food dictionary you have offered. My e-mail address is [email protected]. Thanks
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Mar 25th, 2003, 05:01 PM
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rex
 
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StCirq:

Do I recall correctly that you have posted this or somehow made this publicly available on the Delphi francophile forum?

Seems that I remember that now - - am I imagining that? or have I pseudo-recalled something?
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Mar 25th, 2003, 05:14 PM
  #19  
kjl
 
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Here is the link for the French Food
Glossary from the Francophile forum.

Just click the link and download.
I hope this helps everyone.

http://www.intimatefrance.com/glossary.html
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Mar 25th, 2003, 05:41 PM
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Rex: Yes, there are a couple of ways of obtaining this, one if you are an AOL member and one if you're not, provided by kjl. How it ended up on the Intimate France website was that the person who runs those tours was a part of the original group of Francophiles on AOL quite a few years ago. If you can't get it there, e-mail me and I'll send it to you.
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