St. John - best place to find job opportunities?

Feb 12th, 2011, 02:37 PM
  #1  
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St. John - best place to find job opportunities?

As we dream on a daily basis of relocating to St. John, I'm starting to look into first steps: finding a job there. Does anyone know of any websites that you can direct me to to keep an eye out on job postings?

Also, are there any hard statistics on the quality of elementary/high schools there, ie, how they compare to schools in the states with standardized testing, etc?
thanks!
Kellybeaches
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Feb 12th, 2011, 06:57 PM
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Have you been to St. John before? I ask only because it's a really small island. Not like there's much going on there.

Actually I did visit a school in St. Thomas thinking of trying to get a job teaching there, but that was a long time ago (right after college), so information too old to be useful.
suze is offline  
Feb 13th, 2011, 05:01 AM
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Hi Suze,
Yes, we were in St. John about 3 years ago and loved it. Small and not much going on is just our style. My husband actually wants to buy land in Long Island, Bahamas which makes St. John seem like Manhattan in comparison. I prefer a little more doing so St. John would be a good fit for us. I was looking at the Mango Terrace Villas:
http://www.islandiarealestate.com/mangodev.htm
Does anyone know anything about these relatively new condos? They look to be in a good location. Even if we started out going the fractional ownership route would be good, which they offer. It seems like finding real estate for sale online is easier than finding job posting though which is why I posted this question here to see if anyone might have some direction on that.
thanks!
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Feb 13th, 2011, 05:08 AM
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Interesting. I just read the thread from rdugirl on "RN wanting to relocate..." and RoamsAround provided a lot of good information. I'll check out the link and it sounds like the best bet is to buy a vacation home or fractional ownership to stay there for an extended period of time first in order to really see if it's a good fit for moving long term and finding jobs.
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Feb 13th, 2011, 05:10 AM
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Did you see this current thread?

http://www.fodors.com/community/cari...o-relocate.cfm

There's some good information in that thread and RoamsAround references a great site for all things USVI relocation related.
sharona is offline  
Feb 13th, 2011, 05:12 AM
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Obviously you posted before I had a chance to hit Submit. It think there's a wealth of information in that site RoamsAround listed.
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Feb 13th, 2011, 05:17 AM
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thanks Sharona!
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Feb 13th, 2011, 05:12 PM
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when you look into the fractionals, keep in mind to research it completely. Although you'd owe a "4th" of a condo, sometimes it's not available for use continously, so that's not going to work for living and working there. They reserve the right to move you around, and you probably can't get the 3 months continously. Fractional is not going to work for what you have in mind. Fractional is also not a bargain, if the other 3 owners decide that want to change things, you're forced to do so, and pay what it costs. If the other 3 want to use it, you're out.

Keep in mind islands require very expensive work permits.

Even though St. John is a US territory, consider they laws can still be different, everything from overtime to overworked without compensation, and it takes a lot longer to get things done.

School is not on the same level as in the States. Most ex=pats, or families in your position, eventually send kids to school back in the States.

You really need to have enough money to live off of for 6 months without working (even though you may have a job) and realize that the reality is nothing of doing it is nothing like you think it is. You may want to consider living there during the summer to see if it will really work. (and use the time to explore your options.) when you do work, you won't find all that time to hang out on the beach.

It all sounds so negatives. It's a terrific dream, but there are many things to consider that most don't think about.

You might want to read 2 books: Who Started the Carnival, and The Carnival Never Got Started. 1rst 1 is not a true story, but rings true. 2nd one is a true story. Another one, A Trip To The Beach, also touches on island life.

Those books discuss the frustrations of living the dream
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Feb 14th, 2011, 05:43 AM
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I think the first book Blamona is referencing is "Don't Stop the Carnival" by Herman Wouk.

Kelly, I think you need to do some hard investigating on the school side for your kids.
Jimmie is offline  
Feb 14th, 2011, 05:55 AM
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that is the book-thanks!

I agree about the schools
blamona is offline  
Feb 14th, 2011, 06:40 AM
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How about starting by talking to the school system? See if you can arrange an 'informational interview'. If being employed as a teacher is necessary to the plan of living full time on St John, I think that will be your biggest hurdle. More than getting used to the pace of island life or some of the other challenges living as an ex-pat in the caribbean.
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Feb 16th, 2011, 10:42 AM
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The only problem with buying a new condo on St John is that the island is being developed with no regard to its very limited infrastructure. Many large condo projects manage to bypass zoning and building codes because the process is pretty corrupt - which benefits the developers of course but hurts the buyer in the long run.

Water is terribly scarce on the island. Most are on cisterns, and the back up plan is water trucked over from St Thomas - which during a dry spell can take several days and is expensive. There is some public water in Cruz Bay but that desalinization plant is undersized and has reported maintenance issues.

Electricity comes from St Thomas via an underwater extension cord. Needless to say, it's known to not be very reliable.

Sewage is mostly via septic system, and due to the rock ground most leach too quickly, and waste ends up in the water.

Trash disposal is an ongoing nightmare with it piling up on St. Thomas...
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