Americans traveling to cuba with 9 year old

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Jun 8th, 2016, 11:59 PM
  #21
 
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Wynterrose no longer exists . >>

that was quick, JJ.

what happened in the last 4 days that I missed?
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Jun 9th, 2016, 04:07 AM
  #22
 
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Mad-- to do things legally, especially with a child, you'll have to have a people to people itenerary for Trinidad, not just stroll and go to the beach

I would set up an itenerary with your guide for the while time unless you want to show a 9 year old how to get around laws

Especially since you're asking on a public forum

Sorry to be Debbie downer here- actually might end up being an exciting time for a 9 year old to see (and will always hold it against you when they want to get away with something in the futur)

Just saying!

8-)
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Jun 9th, 2016, 04:08 AM
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Whole time not while time
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Jun 9th, 2016, 04:19 AM
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Annhig-as a non US citizen it's always easier to encourage an American to break laws writing on public forums isn't it?

Mad is asking how to get around laws being Americans and just because you might be against these laws you encourage getting around them--

Nice!

You need people to people exchange the entire time, if you think a 9 year old is going to be bored pick someone else to go, or teach them a lesson in breaking the laws

It's not as easy as pretending to have a people to people exchange when you really want to be free and do what you want or having a people to people exchange is a moot point.

You must show a complete what your doing with no free time to break away
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Jun 9th, 2016, 04:21 AM
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Again somewhere not someone, I
Need to edit!
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Jun 9th, 2016, 04:41 AM
  #26
mad
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Placing all judgmental and presumptuous accusations aside, I still appreciate feedback on what others have done in Trinidad. I'm willing to risk turning my child into a juvenile delinquent by gathering some more information...
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Jun 9th, 2016, 05:27 AM
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<
Mad is asking how to get around laws being Americans and just because you might be against these laws you encourage getting around them-->>

I'm not aware that I've encouraged an american citizen to break laws [except perhaps jokingly suggested that the odd afternoon on a beach might not be noticed] nor that Mad is asking how to get round the laws. What she wanted was advice on how she could organise her own trip to Cuba, rather than going with an organised tour. It is perfectly legal for US citizens to visit Cuba independently.


I get the distinct impression that you don't want other americans to go to Cuba - I wonder why that is?
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Jun 9th, 2016, 05:40 AM
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Annhig did you write a trip report that included your time in Trinidad? I just want to make sure this is a good place to go with a child. We only have three nights so just need a few activities. I'm not sure what there is besides strolling around town and going to the beach? The waterfall hikes look too challenging for a youngish kid.>>

Sorry, Mad, I missed this in the excitement of being flamed by blamona. With only 2 days in Trinidad you shouldn't have any problems filling them with interesting activities - there are plenty of museums and galleries in the historic centre of the town, there is the Steam train to the Valley of the sugar Mills and our aussie friends did a trip on a lorry out into the Topes de Collates that their 8 year old managed very well.
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Jun 9th, 2016, 05:42 AM
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Here are some more ideas:

this was supposed to be a link to the lonely planet webpage about Trinidad but it won't post for some reason; you can easily google it by searching for "things to do in Trinidad de Cuba"

[ignore the bit about the beach, obviously]

It also has some accommodation ideas that might interest you.
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Jun 9th, 2016, 05:42 AM
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If you're still unsure, you could also look at Cienfuegos which is slightly closer to Havana than Trinidad and which we really liked - here are some things to do there:

http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Attract...ince_Cuba.html

The excursion to the El Nino waterfalls which we did on the way to Trinidad was actually very easy [and if you want to swim, the main pool has a life guard!] and the botanical gardens and/or the Guanaroca Lagoon are very interesting. Lots to see and do with no problems filling 2 days.
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Jun 9th, 2016, 05:53 AM
  #31
mad
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Thanks so much annhig. Sorry you've been accused of enabling a criminal
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Jun 9th, 2016, 06:10 AM
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Mad - don't worry about it. I'm not.
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Jun 22nd, 2016, 08:55 AM
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It is easy to understand how people born and raised in liberty and democracy can take things for granted.
They seem unable to understand that traveling to Cuba is placing themselves and their family to the mercy of a brutal and lawless dictatorial government, known for changing laws and regulation by the struck of a pen.
Ask how many Americans are and have been in Cuban jails for innocent acts, or without a reason.
On top of that Cuban's sanitary control is not existent, lack of running water is pretty common. Good luck in your trip!
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Jun 22nd, 2016, 12:00 PM
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Mad - I do not know where these people get their information from - or why they seem so keen to dissuade you from doing something that is perfectly normal. I suspect that they have never been there and watch Fox News a lot.

Far from being lawless, it seemed to us that the Cuban government was highly bureaucratic and well organised - it may not be a system you like, but they certainly have one. The only reference to an american citizen imprisoned in Cuba that I could find in what i confess was a quick google search was to Alan Gross who was clearly suspected by the Cubans of being a US spy, and who had made multiple trips to the island. I can't see any reason why they would have such suspicions of you or your family, so long as you take normal precautions of not photographing military sites, which would get you into trouble in most places, including the US.

As for water shortages, the only place that we came across that problem was in Santa Clara where it seemed to be a regular difficulty. However everyone drinks bottled water which was quite cheap. Their sewage system is old, but functions reasonably well so long as you don't try to put toilet paper down the loo, but that again is a problem in lots of places throughout the world.

In short, Cuban is a 2nd world country; not surprising given the US embargo.

go, and enjoy yourselves.
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Jun 23rd, 2016, 10:56 AM
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annhig I can give many more examples of Americans falsely accused in Cuba, but this is not the proper site for political discussion. (BTW, Allan Gross was guilty of giving away cell phones to people in Cuba, Yes! that was a crime until 3 or 4 years ago, now it's not thanks to a another struck of a pen).
And as for "where these people get their information from", I was born and raised in Cuba. I escaped in 1989 at age 32, but I still have strong connections with friends and family that keep me very well informed of what happens in paradise behind the propaganda.
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Jun 23rd, 2016, 01:28 PM
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I'll go back to my original question, Mad: What's drawing you to Cuba? Most important, what does your child like to do on vacation? Cuba just does not strike me as having a lot that will interest a 9 y/o kid. Someone said earlier that Cubans love children. That's true, but that doesn't necessarily translate into a lot of activities that will keep them occupied.

You know your child best, obviously.
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Sep 5th, 2016, 07:29 AM
  #37
 
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Mad...assume you are still planning? It seems scheduled service will now start Dec. 1 2016 at least with Delta so air travel will be simplified for sure. Delta seems to have their act together...can provide the documents and sell the insurance etc. Above comments about the people to people etc. are really based on some old info. That said Cuba is a country in the state of change now and I can sure see the desire to see it before it changes too much and just becomes another caribbean vacation island. Because of the infrastructure I am doing some research to see about a land company to assist with all details but not a structured tour. It will be a great trip for a 9 year old...he/she should be able to understand a bit of the background and where things are headed and yep they will love the cars!! Good luck
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Sep 7th, 2016, 09:47 AM
  #38
 
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Scheduled service is starting in September; the first flight has gone already. Visitors still have to check a box indicating their reason (out of the 12 permitted, among which is still not tourism proper) for travel. The traveler is supposed to keep documentation supporting the trip for 5 years.
According to all reports on the forums, no one (US gov't)has been checking for several years now, at re-entry to the US, or any of the saved documentation.

IMHO the Cuban-born poster above has views that are out of sync with even the majority of younger Cuban-Americans of her age (as has been expressed to me). The boycott and the history of bad diplomatic relations will be wiped away quite soon by the US government, and folks like this will become dinosaurs, holding grudges for reasons long gone, while the rest of us enjoy tropical breezes on our vacations. Look at the example of South Africa for a more reasonable way to move forward.

OP, I'm sure your 9 year old will find plenty to interest him with the exciting music, colorful architecture, beautiful landscape, old cars, crafts, glimpses of a different life style. traveling around, even with no Spanish, is currently not as difficult as some here make it out to be. Hope you have a great trip.
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Sep 7th, 2016, 10:24 AM
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IMHO the Cuban-born poster above has views that are out of sync with even the majority of younger Cuban-Americans of her age (as has been expressed to me). >>

SambaChula - I absolutely agree with you - we saw plenty of US flags on display in Cuba, even on T-shirts. The US is popular there with youngsters already.
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Sep 7th, 2016, 11:59 AM
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I was actually referring to Cuban-born younger people now living in the US and/or younger Americans of Cuban heritage.

We in the US are perhaps most used to hearing from the very-politically-active-in-south-Florida, often quite wealthy again, now-elderly generation of Cubans who fled the island in the early days, thinking they speak for all Cubans in the US.
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