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To send the batteries, or to not send the batteries

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Dec 4th, 2009, 05:40 PM
  #1
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To send the batteries, or to not send the batteries

This seems like a silly question, but here goes.........I am sending a package from the U.S. to someone in Newfoundland. One of the items is a Christmas decoration requiring 3-AAA batteries. I am a firm believer in givng the recipient batteries to go along with their gift. Will Customs have a problem with my including batteries in the pkg.? I was thinking maybe the fact batteries have acid (I think) might cause a problem. If I don't include the batteries and my friend in Nfld. needs to purchase them, do they have the same ones available as we do in The States? Thanks for helping with my HUGE dilemma. : )
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Dec 4th, 2009, 06:10 PM
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Well, the only thing I can say for sure is that yes the batteries we buy here are exactly the same as in the States. So that would not be a problem at all.

As for sending the batteries, I don't know. It seems to me it would be ok, but I don't know that for sure.
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Dec 4th, 2009, 06:31 PM
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Thanks, kodi.....DH felt your batteries were the same as over here, but I just wanted to hear it from a Canadian.
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Dec 5th, 2009, 12:23 PM
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This is from the Post Office site, batteries are listed under Class 9: http://www.canadapost.ca/tools/pg/ma...-e.asp#1385134

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Classes/Index

Customers who are uncertain whether the items they intend to mail are dangerous goods should verify with the manufacturer or supplier or contact CANUTEC by phone at 1-613-992-4624. Customers can also consult www.tc.gc.ca/tdg/clear/menu.htm for information.
Table 1: List of Dangerous Goods
Category

Items
Class 1 – Explosives

ammunition; black powder; blasting caps, cartridge; detonators; dynamite; explosive fuses and igniters; fireworks; flash powder; grenades; nitro-glycerine; rocket motors; signal flares; toy and starting pistol caps
Class 2 – Compressed Gases

aerosol products; Butane; propane; carbon dioxide; cigarette lighter with fuel; cryogenic liquids; cylinders of compressed gas (oxygen, air, acetylene, etc.); fire extinguishers; mustard gas
Class 3 – Flammable Liquids

acetone; adhesives (glues); alcohols (butanols, methanol, ethanol, etc.); camping fuel; cigarette lighter fuel; furniture stripper; gasoline; gasoline additives; naphtha; paints, enamels, lacquers, etc.; perfumes; petroleum distillates; shaving lotion; solvents; thinners; turpentine
Class 4 – Flammable Solids, Spontaneously Combustible, Dangerous When Wet

calcium; cellulose products; fire starters; flameless ration heaters (FRH); fuel tablets; magnesium; matches; moth balls; naphthalene; nitro-oily cotton waste; oil impregnated fabrics; phosphorous; sodium
Class 5 – Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides

adhesives; ammonium nitrate fertilizer; bleaching powders; disinfectants; fibreglass repair kits; hair and textile dyes; hydrogen peroxide (>=8%);
nitrates; organic peroxides; oxygen pellets
Class 6 – Poisonous and Infectious

antiknock compounds; arsenic; carbon tetrachloride; chloroform; disinfectants; drugs; dyes; fungicides; hepatitis; herbicides; HIV; infectious biological; infectious blood; insecticides; pesticides; photographic chemicals; wood preservatives
Class 7 – Radioactive

measuring instruments; medical isotopes
Class 8 – Corrosive

acids (hydrochloric, sulphuric, nitric, muriatic, etc.); battery acid; caustic soda; cleaners; disinfectants; drain openers; dyes; etching fluid; fire extinguishers; formaldehyde; household bleach; lye; mercury; mercury thermometers and blood pressure gauges; oven cleaners; paint or varnish remover; potassium hydroxide; rust remover; self heating beverages (SHB); soda lime; sodium hydroxide

Class 9 – Miscellaneous

air bags; asbestos; battery powered devices with battery installed (toys, laptop computers, etc.); dry ice; gas filled shock absorbers; hazardous wastes; lithium batteries; self inflating life preservers; strong magnets
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Dec 5th, 2009, 12:38 PM
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Thanks a lot for all the great info, Morningglory47! I can tell DH I was right to be concerned about sending the batteries....sounds like it would be best not to include them in the package. I'll save the list you sent for future reference.
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Dec 6th, 2009, 09:05 AM
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You're welcome, RS! Merry Christmas!
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Dec 7th, 2009, 10:17 AM
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Morningglory47, Merry Christmas to you also and best wishes for a good New Year! We had our first snowfall last night...about 2 inches. I'm guessing you've had snow for awhile up there. A white Christmas is always nice, but not so great sometimes for driving.
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Dec 7th, 2009, 06:36 PM
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RST, we have been very lucky and have not had any snow yet. But I know our time is coming! It would be nice to have a white Christmas, then it can just go away!
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Dec 8th, 2009, 06:40 AM
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For Toronto readers, I'm at Warden and Kingston and it's white out there this morning - maybe it's a heavy frost but it looks like snow and there was definitely flurries when I was putting the Christmas lights display out yesterday.

RS, we had no snow at all in November for the first time since 1937.
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Dec 8th, 2009, 06:18 PM
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Morningglory, nothing white out in my neck of the woods! And I'm happy with that... tonight might be a different story.
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Dec 8th, 2009, 07:50 PM
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kodi, I hear you! I can enjoy a white Christmas and then I don't need anymore for the rest of the winter. We have had a couple more inches of snow and now the possibility of an ice storm tonight.

Morningglory, that is quite a record you've broken....wow, since 1937! I'm in central Illinois about 3 hrs. from Chicago western suburbs and we rarely get much snow in Nov. Both of you drive carefully....
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Dec 9th, 2009, 07:34 PM
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kodi drives - I'm one of those odd individuals who never learned - I bus it, or subway or streetcar it.
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Dec 10th, 2009, 03:01 PM
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Morningglory, that sounds great....leave the driving to someone else. I guess I should treat myself to a bus or taxi one of these days. Our town doesn't have subway,we have the sandwiches , or streetcar available.
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