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can i use my 100 volts japanese appliance in the US?

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Dec 14th, 2010, 08:22 PM
  #1
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can i use my 100 volts japanese appliance in the US?

i posted this question in the US forum but perhaps i should ask the japanese travelers to the US. im thnking of bringing my electric blanket on my trip to the US? thanks for any info.
heiwa2007 is offline  
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Dec 14th, 2010, 09:00 PM
  #2
 
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You already got a lot of good answers to this same question on the US Board. Have you gone back to read them?
Jaya is offline  
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Dec 16th, 2010, 03:41 PM
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If it's electronics, it will state on the plug if it has a voltage converter. USA is 110V. Although you can plug your Japanese electronics and it will charge, I find it messes with the circuitry, and it will either die quickly or take forever to charge. This is based on my experience of Japanese cell phone and laptop in USA. I have not used things such as hairdryer or straightener.
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Dec 16th, 2010, 04:16 PM
  #4
 
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Echoing Jaya, these are excellent answers to your question from the US board. I repost them here for your convenience:

<
You don't need a plug adapter because the plugs on Japanese appliances are the same as non-polarized US plugs. The biggest difference aside from the 10V is that the electrical system in most of Japan operates at 50Hz while in the US it's 60 Hz. This shouldn't make much of a difference except for more sensitive equipment like electronics.

But I'll echo the question of why you'd want to lug an electric blanket in your bags.

50Hz vs 60Hz will make no difference to most electronic items like computers, cell phones, PDAs, etc. They all run on DC voltage anyway - not AC. The "brick" on the power cord contains a transformer to supply the correct voltage and converts the AC to DC - usually around 5V for phones and the like, and around 18-20V for computers depending on the brand.

The frequency will make a difference for plug in clocks and and motors - they will all run faster in the US vs Japan.>>
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Jan 2nd, 2011, 11:45 PM
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There are inexpensive electric blankets available at most pharmacys and big box stores in the USA. If you like your blanket, its better to spare it the travel.
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