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When the engines stop the whining you hear is a travel journalist

When the engines stop the whining you hear is a travel journalist

May 29th, 2007, 03:39 PM
  #61  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 3,864
Soccr: "but THIS time it happened to "ME" of all people! NOW it's a noteworthy event!"

As someone who does this kind of work for a living, I disagree with you slightly on this point, soccr. An experienced reporter has the knack to put together a good story in a way that will get attention. They can perform a service to the public in that way. No matter what we all thought of this particular story (and I agree with the consensus here that it was whiny and he neglected to do his research), he did craft an engaging story, one that we all took the time to read.
Jeff_Costa_Rica is offline  
May 29th, 2007, 03:55 PM
  #62  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 10,190
I guess I'm just more careful about things and make sure I know the fine print first and requirements BEFORE getting to the airport.

If I didn't approve of the costs, I wouldn't fly the airline.

If I didn't know the costs first and took the flight, I might feel taken advantage of, but I certainly wouldn't then book a return flight with that same airline KNOWING that I would be charged that fee a second time and then whine about it extensively. The first flight might garner some sympathy, but the second flight is just dumb.

If I know I'm booking with a "no frills", economy service, I'm going to check their rules very carefully as they tend to be stricter than their more expensive counterparts.

I also wonder about the writer since he was taking the trip to "write about" that specific airline and limits his entire article on the baggage.

If he had anything at all to say about any other part of the flight or service, I might not think he was out of line.

But instead, he rants about a baggage issue that isn't going to be an issue for many people and never mentions anything else of importance to travelers.
toedtoes is offline  
May 29th, 2007, 04:06 PM
  #63  
 
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< I sure would never fly with them again after such a gouging.>>
Exactly Kareng! And that IMO is where Greenberg loses all his credability.

Not only does he fly again with them again - he flies with the same amount of luggage... and pays more than he did the first time. Why????
In the few days before his return flight, does he find an alternate solution for this whopping pile of luggage? No... Why?
Cause he was "making" a story.
Does easyJet advertise on his web site...NO...but guess what airlines do.
robjame is offline  
May 30th, 2007, 10:52 PM
  #64  
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 803
Alan, they're not charging exorbitant baggage fees just to keep the fares down for loyal fine-print readers such as yourself. They're doing it, as someone else mentioned, because they see a huge potential for profit. Nothing more. Not even the king of all budget airlines -- Southwest -- is that cheap. Vacationers from North America, who are on weeklong or two-week trips and, therefore, aren't packing light, had better beware of easyjet.


<<< So why is it OK for easyjet to do that? >>>

Because if they didn't then they'd have to charge people who do read the rules more for their flight as they wouldn't make any money from people too stupid or lazy to read things that are in plain sight
andrews98682 is offline  
May 31st, 2007, 03:37 AM
  #65  
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<<< Vacationers from North America, who are on weeklong or two-week trips and, therefore, aren't packing light, had better beware of easyjet. >>>

Easyjet actually have quite a large luggage allowance compared to most Low Costs Airlines - indeed it's better than a number of Full Costs Airlines

If "experienced" "travel" "journalist" like that had travelled Ryanair for example would have paid £150 more excess baggage than for Easyjet.

MOST people can keep to the weight limits (even for weeklong or two-week trips), so why should they be penalised when "Vacationers from North America, who are on weeklong or two-week trips" assume that because they have a 2x23kg bag allowance across the Atlantic that it's compulsory to carry 2x23kg bags everywhere they go
alanRow is offline  
May 31st, 2007, 05:26 AM
  #66  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
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If they're reaping off huge profits from excess baggage fees, then so be it. That let them keep their fares low for those who 1) travel light and 2) read the terms and conditions.

I am all for them gouging ignorant travelers!
rkkwan is offline  
May 31st, 2007, 06:07 AM
  #67  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,725
<<Vacationers from North America, who are on weeklong or two-week trips and, therefore, aren't packing light, had better beware of easyjet.>>
Agreed.
People in the US don't go int McD's and expect a good, nutritious meal.
You don't go into Costco and expect service.
You don't expect Polo at Walmart.
After all, the US is the "you get what you pay for" center of the world.
So why would Greenberg expect the same level of benefits that he is accustomed to on the full fare airlines? The answer is, he doesn't... but those other airlines advertise with him and it makes a good story for those who hang on his every word.
Please follow the strength of your convictions and avoid EasyJet. I hate line ups.
robjame is offline  
May 31st, 2007, 09:08 AM
  #68  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,945
You know my fellow posters, there are clearly two different viewpoints here and just because someone disagrees with you and doesn't accept your viewpoint, you don't have to get nasty with each other.
Jack is offline  
May 31st, 2007, 07:12 PM
  #69  
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
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"After all, the US is the "you get what you pay for" center of the world.
So why would Greenberg expect the same level of benefits that he is accustomed to on the full fare airlines?"

Robjame, there's the flaw in your argument. In North America, the budget airlines allow two checked bags at 50 pounds and only charge a nominal fee for going over the limit -- same as the Americans and Uniteds and Deltas. And that includes Southwest. So I have a hard time believing that Easyjet and Ryanair et al are charging ridiculous baggage fees to better serve their passengers.

For the record, here's Southwest's policy:

Baggage Allowance: For each ticketed Customer, Southwest allows three (3) checked pieces with size limitations for each individual piece.
Excess Baggage: Excess baggage will be charged at the rate of $50.00 each for the first (1st) through the ninth (9th) extra bag and $110.00 for each piece checked thereafter.
Weight and Size Allowance: Maximum weight is 50 pounds and maximum size is 62 inches (length + width + height) per checked piece of luggage. Effective March 1, 2005, overweight items from 51 to 70 pounds will be accepted for a charge of $25.00 per item. Items weighing from 71 to 100 pounds and oversized items in excess of 62 inches but not more than 80 inches (i.e., surfboards, bicycles, vaulting poles) will be accepted for a charge of $50.00 per item. Any item weighing more than 100 pounds must be shipped as Air Cargo. However, Customers cannot use SWA Cargo unless classified as a Known Shipper as defined by the FAA or FAA approved Indirect Air Carriers (IAC). For all Cargo inquires please call the Cargo Sales and Service Center at 1-800-533-1222.
andrews98682 is offline  

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