Sleeping pills for long haul flights

Mar 7th, 2014, 07:42 PM
  #21  
 
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Be aware that many people have problems with Ambien. There is the danger that you will do things/respond to stimuli in your sleep and get yourself into trouble on the plane. It happens to people all the time at home - sleep walking, eating, sleep driving (now that is one that has gotten some high profile people into trouble). If you haven't had problems with this before, you are a bit safer, but some people even after using Ambien on and off for years have this experience.

It is believed that many of the instances of truly outrageous behavior on planes has been related to Ambien use.

I don't sleep well on planes. I nap if I can, but I do use melationin and behavioral approaches to get myself quickly into the new time zone.
Kathie is offline  
Mar 7th, 2014, 09:22 PM
  #22  
 
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If you're going this artificial route, no alcohol. That's a dangerous combination.

To the OP: If you look on your friend's Ambien bottle, there will be a label that says:

"Caution: Federal law prohibits the transfer of this drug to any person other than the patient for whom it was prescribed."

At least get your own prescription.
Jeff_Costa_Rica is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 12:38 AM
  #23  
 
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No matter what I take, after 9 hours I'm afraid I'm going to die. After 10 hours I which I would!!

regards - tom
cary999 is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 02:59 AM
  #24  
 
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First sleeping tablets doctor prescribed were Stilnox??????? I was just prescribed Temazepan. I read the warnings and possible side effects and never used them for the flight.
MissGreen is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 04:23 PM
  #25  
 
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Stilnox & Ambien are the same. Just different brand names for Zolpidem.

gigiib -

Just be aware that Ambien CR might leave you feeling much more groggy than regular Ambien. Don't take it unless you have a full eight hours to sleep. I can't take the CR, it makes me feel really weird and sort of hungover, whereas the regular Ambien works very well for me.
Melnq8 is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 05:30 PM
  #26  
 
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>>>Be aware that many people have problems with Ambien.<<

I think problems with Ambien have been taking the longer acting Ambien CR and people that have been on it for a longer time. There are millions taking it with no problems.
kybourbon is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 06:16 PM
  #27  
 
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And then there are the folks that I have had on my flights that we seriously could not wake up when they took Ambien after we either landed or in one case when we had a mechanical and had to go back to the gate. We needed the paramedics to get the guy off the plane in a stretcher!
dutyfree is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 06:28 PM
  #28  
 
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Anyone thinking about taking pills for sleeping on plane be it Ambien or Melatonin or Benydryl should try it out at home for a night and see what happens. And maybe try again another night as well. Don't want any surprises at 30,000+ feet.
DebitNM is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 09:13 PM
  #29  
 
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kyburbon, the problems with Ambien have been well-documented long before Ambien CR was introduced. "There are millions taking it with no problems." So the drug companies would like us to believe. The drug companies have not wanted to publicize the problems with Ambien, but the reports have been so numerous they have had to admit to them. If you have taken it with no problems, good for you, but it is not the experience of everyone. Also, having taken it without problems don't make you immune to developing these problems.

BTW, melatonin is not appropriate for use on an airplane. It's method of action is to "reset" the body clock, and needs to be done with exposure to sunlight in the early morning.
Kathie is offline  
Mar 8th, 2014, 11:32 PM
  #30  
 
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So Ambien, or Zolpidem (generic Ambien), when you try something new like this, first test it at home. So you know if it works and how it works on you.

Hydrocodone, (Vicodin, Norco) 10mg dose, works good for me.

regards - tom
cary999 is offline  
Mar 9th, 2014, 04:18 PM
  #31  
 
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Melatonin

MAIN RESULTS:

: Nine of the ten trials found that melatonin, taken close to the target bedtime at the destination (10pm to midnight), decreased jet-lag from flights crossing five or more time zones. Daily doses of melatonin between 0.5 and 5mg are similarly effective, except that people fall asleep faster and sleep better after 5mg than 0.5mg. Doses above 5mg appear to be no more effective. The relative ineffectiveness of 2mg slow-release melatonin suggests that a short-lived higher peak concentration of melatonin works better. Based on the review, the number needed to treat (NNT) is 2. The benefit is likely to be greater the more time zones are crossed, and less for westward flights. The timing of the melatonin dose is important: if it is taken at the wrong time, early in the day, it is liable to cause sleepiness and delay adaptation to local time. The incidence of other side effects is low. Case reports suggest that people with epilepsy, and patients taking warfarin may come to harm from melatonin.

REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS:

: Melatonin is remarkably effective in preventing or reducing jet-lag, and occasional short-term use appears to be safe. It should be recommended to adult travellers flying across five or more time zones, particularly in an easterly direction, and especially if they have experienced jet-lag on previous journeys.
mlgb is offline  
Mar 10th, 2014, 05:30 AM
  #32  
 
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>>>Ambien have been well-documented long before Ambien CR <<<

I think it's less than 1%. If you look at the studies, it's typically people taking longterm (nightly)and higher doses, often along with other things (especially CNS drugs or alcohol), elderly or renal impairment. Some cut their pills in half (CR should not be cut because of the coating design which affects it being absorbed).

I have relatives and co-workers that take Ambien nightly with no side effects. I know doctors that take it for flights. The majority of people have no issue with this drug. Regular Ambien (the old kind) has a half life of something like 2.5 hours.

***Studies of Ambien in non-elderly patients with insomnia did not detect evidence of next-day residual effects using the DSST, the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), and patient ratings of alertness.***
***Controlled studies in adults utilizing objective measures of memory yielded no consistent evidence of next-day memory impairment following the administration of Ambien.***
kybourbon is offline  
Mar 10th, 2014, 09:21 AM
  #33  
 
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Well of course taking a narcotic might just make you drowsy!!
suze is offline  
Mar 10th, 2014, 11:40 PM
  #34  
 
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Ambien, Zolpidem, works best on an empty stomach. If taken daily, most people develop a toleranace for it and thus it becomes ineffective. Same thing for hydrocodone.

regards - tom
cary999 is offline  
Jul 2nd, 2016, 09:15 AM
  #35  
 
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as an airline pilot, trust me the last thing u want to do is take a tablet to "knock yoursel out" cold. I don't mean to sound smart or anything but if your out cold and the aircraft needs to be evacuated, ur putting the lives of the flight crew AMD other passengers at risk as the will be the ones who have to stay behind to ensure you get off safely, also along with that I know of several pilots who will do what ever they can (myself) included to prevent passengers taking "knock-out" drugs. before you consider this stupid idea think of the peoples lives you are risking just to kill the boredom of a long flight.
CaptainGilligan747 is offline  
Jul 2nd, 2016, 09:18 AM
  #36  
 
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as an airline pilot, trust me the last thing u want to do is take a tablet to "knock yoursel out" cold. I don't mean to sound smart or anything but if your out cold and the aircraft needs to be evacuated, ur putting the lives of the flight crew AMD other passengers at risk as the will be the ones who have to stay behind to ensure you get off safely, also along with that I know of several pilots who will do what ever they can (myself) included to prevent passengers taking "knock-out" drugs. before you consider this stupid idea think of the peoples lives you are risking just to kill the boredom of a long flight.
CaptainGilligan747 is offline  
Jul 2nd, 2016, 11:13 AM
  #37  
 
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I take a 5mg, half the normal dose, of Ambien on long haul flights. I recently used it on a 16.5 hour flight to Hong Kong and got 5-6 hours of sleep, no after effects.
If I fly east coast US to Europe I don't take anything as the flight isn't long enough and I worry about being asleep too long.
HappyTrvlr is offline  
Aug 13th, 2016, 11:12 AM
  #38  
 
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The chances of your plane being in an emergency .. is likely one in 500, 000... and that's not separating the emergencies that are survivable ( so you want to be awake) to the ones that are not ( and I would want to sleep through that free fall or explosion thank you ) ..

My doctor said Melatonin was a safe "sleeping pill " ( yes.. we both know it is not technically a sleeping pill) for my kids.. ( I have a son with issues that made this something I had to look into for a long haul flight) ..

I have tons of trouble falling asleep on a plane.. even on an Ativan.. I would love to just conk out.. but haven't bothered to ask my doctor for anything stronger.

I would only take something for a long haul flight over 9-10 hours..
justineparis is online now  
Aug 20th, 2016, 12:40 PM
  #39  
 
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Just to share my experience over a number of flights, at home, Ambien gives me rapid (15') sleep: 5 mg-4 hours, 10mg, 5-6 hours. Rare use.

But the times I have used it on a long 10+ hr) flight, if I do fall asleep at all I actually wake to alertness quite fast and am clear and not at all groggy. Maybe because I am kind of hyper-alert on plane anyway. I might get 2 hours if I am really lucky.

I think the captain's point is well taken, however.
annw is offline  
Aug 20th, 2016, 02:45 PM
  #40  
 
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Wow this is an oldie popped up again.

Many people above talked about using an anti-anxiety (in the -pan family). You aren't "knocked out" and would be able to deal with an emergency should it arise.
suze is offline  

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