What's the Best film Speed to take?

Reply

Aug 23rd, 2004, 04:16 PM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 29
What's the Best film Speed to take?

I will be traveling in Tanzania and Kenya in September. I have a Canon 35 mm camera and normally use 200 speed film. I read one comment that 400 speed film was recommended. Does anyone else recommend 400 film?

Lucretia
Lucretia is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 23rd, 2004, 06:30 PM
  #2
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 814
You will want a range of speeds-- 400 for early morning and dusk/dark and 100 for bright midday with lots of light. Some 200 would be useful too, since you will often find animals in the shade. Sorry the answer is so complicated, but that is wildlife photography...take more than you need, because if you find film it will be expensive, probably not the type or speed that you want and probably not fresh.
tashak is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 23rd, 2004, 07:16 PM
  #3
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 68
The type of lenses you take can also drive the film speed. Long telephotos can be light hungry and require faster film even during the middle of the day if you want to handhold.

Are you taking an empty beanbag? You can buy rice in any town and then use the beanbag to steady the camera on the lip of the vehicle roof.
Scout52 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 24th, 2004, 03:24 AM
  #4
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 723
Lucretia: I have almost always used 400 speed film, whether at dawn/dusk, etc. It seems to work the best. I prefer AGFA film to any of the other brands, but I am sure you will get lots of other feedback!
SusanLynne is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 24th, 2004, 03:43 AM
  #5
sandi
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
... and I've used primarily Fuji or Kodak 200, though have had a few rolls of 400, but rarely used these. The quality of the output was really no different regardless whether 200 or 400. In the end the 200 has worked well for me on all five of my African trips. But whichever you choose, bring more then and all film with you, packed in your carryon bag.
 
Reply With Quote
Aug 24th, 2004, 03:55 AM
  #6
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 9,151
I concur that a mix of 100, 200 and 400 is probably best.

I personally tend to prefer 200 and 400 because if I have a 100 still in my camera when the light starts to fade I can't capture the images I want without slow shutter speeds that lead to camera shake and blurred pictures.

My preference is for Fuji Superia but I also get good results from other films mentioned.

I'm slowly moving more and more towards digital, one advantage being the ability to change ISO for each individual image if the light has changed since I took the last one. I can also change to faster speeds when taking images of moving animals and down to slower speeds for landscapes.

If you search on the words "film" or "camera" or "photography" you'll be able to find recent threads discussing some of your questions which you might find useful.

Kavey
Kavey is offline  
Reply With Quote
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:59 AM.