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Aug 13th, 2005, 07:12 PM
  #21
 
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Roccco - the whole f/stops are 1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, etc. Your 70-200 2.8 with a 1.4x will have a 4.0. You might do some research and see what the 2x teleconverter does on that Sigma lens. That would make the focal distance 640mm. I know the 2x works okay on the Canon 70-200 2.8. The 2x converter loses 2 stops of light so it would be a 5.6 which would be okay for daytime and still give you the extra length that you get with the 100-400.
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Aug 13th, 2005, 08:26 PM
  #22
 
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Sundowner,

The 2x teleconvertor would make the 70-200mm f/2.8, into f/5.6. That is exactly the same as my 80-400mm lens at the longest zoom, but then makes it even slower than the 80-400mm lens on the shorter end (the lens is f/4.5 - 5.6).

One thing I may do is just use the 1.4x teleconvertor on bush walks (on the 70-200mm lens). Then on game drives I would have the 70-200mm lens on one Canon body while keeping the 80-400mm lens on another Canon body (I have a 20d and will more than likely pick up another Canon 20d next week).

I see no need to keep my 17-85mm lens on the camera while on game drives. I may still change lenses during sundowners for panoramic shots. The 17-85mm lens will strictly be used for panoramic shots, people portraits and photos of the camps/lodges.

Also, the 70-200mm lens, again without 1.4x teleconvertor, will be perfect for night game drives. There will never be the occasion to use anything longer than 200mm even with my Sigma 500-EF Super Flash (rated only to about 105mm). If we happen upon a lion or leopard kill and are able to get close, the flash combined with the 70-200mm f/2.8 lens may produce some very nice photos.

I just hope to learn a lot from the mistakes I will surely make this first time out with a DSLR. Hopefully by the time I go to Tanzania I will really improve. Even so, with a 640mm zoom and 8 MP compared to the 190mm lens and 5MP I was limited to with my former camera, I hope for much better results than in the past.
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Aug 14th, 2005, 04:00 PM
  #23
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Rocco -

Go for the dung beetle. They're easy to photo. I even managed one before digital was the thing. With a 35mm 140 zoom.

On my recent trip with the Fuji 5100 (10X and only $285) Finepix, it was a breeze... that is until the beetle decided he prefered the underside of the dung and disappeared from site. We waited and waited, but the critter had no intention of showing us "its' good side." No Puff Aders in the area! LOL!
 
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Aug 15th, 2005, 06:58 AM
  #24
 
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Hello Marynus,

I don't know where you're located, but if you buy the FZ20 you should be able to trade it in towards an FZ30 when you get back from the trip. True, it won't solve your immediate problems, but it will lessen any financial pain.

You should also check Costco and similar places -- they often have great discounts on newly discontinued merchandise.

The FZ30 looks wonderful, but believe me the FZ20 is a wonderful camera -- if you buy it, you won't be disappointed.

Cheers,
Julian
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Aug 15th, 2005, 07:07 AM
  #25
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Thank you all for the great information.
I think I will go for the FZ-20 if i can find it at a nice discount unless anybody else has a better idea.

If there is any change I can get my hands on a FZ-30 at a reasonable price, I will go for that one. I think chances are small though.
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Aug 15th, 2005, 10:39 AM
  #26
 
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I've got a Canon G5 that I'm taking with me on Safari. Does anyone have any good or bad things to say about this camera & how it performs in taking animal shots. Can't afford to replace it. Still trying to figure out all the settings.
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Aug 15th, 2005, 11:25 AM
  #27
 
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reg11:

I used the G5 for several years, but did not take a safari with it. However I am sure that if you have the G5's optional teleconverter lens, which turns the 140mm end of your zoom into a 245mm lens, you would be OK with many wildlife subjects, particularly the larger ones. Smaller subjects, such a birds,etc. will be too small in the frame, even with this teleconverter lens in place.

If you don't already have that accessory, you can buy it for about $100. You also need to buy an adapter that "mates" it to your G5.

Here is a link to a site that sells both the lens and adapter.

If you have any questions, I will be happy to try to answer them.

Phil
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Aug 15th, 2005, 11:27 AM
  #28
 
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Sorry, I forgot to post the link I mentioned:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...goryNavigation

Phil
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Aug 15th, 2005, 11:37 AM
  #29
 
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Thanks Phil for your comments. I do have the extra lens & several filters & a wide lens. As far as birds I'm not too much in them anyways so I guess I will be alright. Thanks again...Jim
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Aug 15th, 2005, 11:56 AM
  #30
 
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Thanks, Jim. Glad you already have the teleconverter. Your G5 is a remarkable camera. I also have used the G2, and now use the G6. You can see examples from all three cameras in my pbase teaching galleries at http://www.pbase.com/pnd1

Phil
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Aug 17th, 2005, 12:12 PM
  #31
 
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One more camera question:
I don't remember seeing any mention of the Sony DSCH1. How does this compare to the Panasonic FZ20? And also what is the main difference between the FZ20 and the Panasonic FZ5?
Thanks
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Aug 17th, 2005, 05:32 PM
  #32
 
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Tigerpaw,

The best way to compare cameras is to read reviews by people who have tested the ones in question.

Here is the conclusion of a review from dpreview.com on the Sony, comparing it to Canon and Panasonic competitors, including the FZ5 and FZ20.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydsch1/page12.asp

I have only used the FZ20, and find it suits my needs. The FZ5 is very similar, and came out after mine did. The Canon uses AA batteries, which for me, anyway are a hassle to recharge in sets. And the Sony does not seem as user friendly to me as other makes. The reviewer from dpreview.com is more familiar with all of them -- take his word over mine.

Phil
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Aug 18th, 2005, 05:44 AM
  #33
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@tigerpaw

The Sony looks like a nice option, too.
I think this one would also suit my needs. I will go to a store to be able to see which one I like best.
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Aug 18th, 2005, 07:35 PM
  #34
 
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Phil,
Thanks for your help. Guess I will decide between the FZ20 and FZ5
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Aug 18th, 2005, 11:01 PM
  #35
 
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Good luck, Tigerpaw. And be sure to read the first review of the new FZ 30, coming soon to a camera store near you. It was posted today on dcresource.com at:

http://dcresource.com/reviews/panaso...ew/index.shtml

Phil

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Aug 18th, 2005, 11:48 PM
  #36
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I would love to have this camera, although I am a bit worried about the noise levels. Mind you that I do not know anything about photography. When would you need the higher ISOs? I presume you would need them with less light..

I have no clue whether to buy this camera (FZ20 or 30) or e.g. the Canon PowerShot S2 IS. After reading all the reviews, I think that the S2 IS might be the best camera, because of the noise levels on the FZ-30.
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Aug 19th, 2005, 03:14 AM
  #37
 
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Hello,

I've never had problems with noise on my FZ20, which is supposedly noisier than the FZ30. This is because the speed of the lens means that you don't need to switch to a higher ISO -- there is so much light coming in you don't need it, even at night. Phil could probably communicate this in a more technical way.

Cheers,
Julian
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Aug 19th, 2005, 03:15 AM
  #38
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Thanks Julian,

That's what happens if a newbie starts reading reviews!
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Aug 19th, 2005, 06:35 AM
  #39
 
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This is just a thought for you all looking at cameras. The Sony, Panasonic and Canon models being discussed here all get resoundingly good reviews on dpreview. You can also get a ton of good information on dpreview's forums. In addition, on that very-well-done web site, you can compare all three models side by side, and decide which is best for your needs. Maybe some of you would value the movie mode, while others want the long reach, etc... I have found it to be an incredible resource!
Cheers,
from another digital newbie!
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Aug 19th, 2005, 04:31 PM
  #40
 
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Cooncat gives good advice. Dpreview.com offers the most comprehensive camera comparisons on the web.

Here is some perspective on the subject of "noise" which is a form of electronic static. All too much is made of noise. It only affects pictures made at the higher ISO speed, and it can only really be seen by those who look at their images at their 100 per cent digital file size. But most people on this forum will look at their pictures as 6x4, 5.7 or 8x10 inch prints. Or as email attachments, or on a photosharing website. Most noise is not noticeable when viewing digital images in these forms.

Always keep this in mind when you read reviews or criticism of noise. It is a really very, very insignificant factor. I tell my students that the only time noise can be an issue is when (1) you can plainly see its effect and (2) it affects the meaning of the picture.

One other point: Julian is correct when he says that faster lenses allow us to shoot at lower ISOs anyway. And in any worsy case scenario, we are always able to filter out noise with a Photoshop "plug in" such as Neat Image, which can be purchased on the web.

It does not make much sense to me to reject a camera primarily because a reviewer or critic reports high noise levels, unless you want to make huge prints from an image.

All non-DSLR digitals have noise at higher ISOs, but very little of it is ever noticed.

Phil
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