The Doctor's Black Bag (Jasher's Travel Medkit)

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Jul 23rd, 2006, 11:39 PM
  #21
 
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Oh and as this all takes up a lot of space I have small bag with a few items for my hand luggage and taking out daily with me - aspirin, bandaids/ bandages, sting relief etc.
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Jul 24th, 2006, 03:22 PM
  #22
 
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Julian:

I like your idea of taking syringes with you. However, in many states you need a doctor's prescription to get them and need to have a note with you in case you are stopped by the police.
Maybe I'll ask my boss to write a precription so I can take a couple next time.
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Jul 25th, 2006, 04:04 AM
  #23
 
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Hi Jan

In the UK, most good travel first-aid kits contain syringes as part of the pack and is what I carry with me. It may be worth looking into something similar that may be available where you are.

Regards

Gaurang
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Jul 25th, 2006, 05:41 AM
  #24
 
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These are good lists. I carry most of these items with me each trip but the only thing I've ever used is sunscreen, allergy/sinus pills, and maybe 10 sprays of bug spray. I've used tweezers too, but they are part of my makeup bag and not the medicine bag. I just unpacked from a trip and wondered if it was worth the space it takes to have all of this stuff.

Does anyone travel with none of these medical items? Have you ever needed anything and if so, what did you do?

BTW, I love margaritas (we call them margarets) and they would be a great safari drink. I like mine on the rocks without salt, please.
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Jul 25th, 2006, 11:20 AM
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Sundowner

I travel like a mini A&E (ER) department, but I've never really had to use anything for me or my wife during all of our trips to Africa. Although on every trip that I've been on, I have always used some of my kit to treat guides/camp staff and also other guests. So it has been useful
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Jul 28th, 2006, 06:16 AM
  #26
 
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Since we' have been travelling to remote places with a samll group including men in their early sixties..., over the last years apart from the usual medical stuff we also take a urine drain (I hope this is the corect word in English).
It is true that my husband is a surgeon,so it is easy, but if there is a doctor around -and there often is one among the travellers - it may be an easy to bring and an enormous relief for a man 'in trouble'!
For women it may also be useful to bring a monodose anti-cystitus drug not easy to find in the bush!
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Jul 28th, 2006, 07:53 AM
  #27
 
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Hi Julian

I like your list.

question:

Why Ibuprofen and Asprin at the same time.? I am curious only !


Kavey:

question:

What is the Motilium for? ( Do you have a bowel disorder or do you use it for nasuea?).

Also what is the Metronidazol for?

I am in no way question what you are taking but would like to know for what condition you use it for.

Thanks to you both

Percy


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Jul 28th, 2006, 08:15 AM
  #28
 
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Hi Percy

My professional assumption would be:

- Soluble aspirin for the flight and as a potential gargle for a sore throat.

- Ibuprofen for analgesia.

I also carry metronidazole on my trips but that's because I have bad teeth It is very useful for dental infections and as a precautionary measure for open fillings. A combination of metronidazole (anaerobic bacteria) + amoxicillin (aerobic bacteria) works wonders when you can't get to a dentist! Most analgesics have no effect on dental pain, if infection has set in (this is from first hand experience ).

Gaurang

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Jul 28th, 2006, 08:21 AM
  #29
 
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Yes I (as well as everyone else) too would like to know, Kavey, if you have a bowel disorder - Not

My kit:
For my own personal needs, I have an ER, OR and cardio entourage at my service for those pesky and unexpected afflictions in the bush.
Sherry

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Jul 28th, 2006, 09:37 AM
  #30
 
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Sherry,
You made me spit out my coffee. Thanks a lot!
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Jul 28th, 2006, 11:58 AM
  #31
 
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Sherry and Patty

I intentionally avoided giving my 2 cents regarding that question quot;>

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Jul 28th, 2006, 07:32 PM
  #32
 
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Guarang

Thanks for the info...I just wanted to know.

Take Care
Percy
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Jul 21st, 2012, 03:08 PM
  #33
 
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Hello all,

Thank you for the great information about putting together a travel kit for Africa. Be careful taking medications across borders. Benadryl is considered a controlled substance in Zambia. Importing it can lead to fines and/or prison time.

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_p.../cis_1062.html
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Jul 22nd, 2012, 06:51 AM
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That was very interesting to read about benadryl being an illegal drug in Zambia. I'm looking up other countries I'll be visiting to make sure I don't make any innocent, costly mistakes like taking in illegal antihistamines!
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Jul 22nd, 2012, 05:41 PM
  #35
 
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Six year old thread but still useful information
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Jul 23rd, 2012, 06:52 AM
  #36
 
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I wonder if the state dept website is up-to-date on the Zambia info.
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Aug 5th, 2012, 01:57 AM
  #37
 
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Ha! Thanks for the resurrection, I obviously missed the remainder of this thread back at the time, how lovely to come across a question about whether I have a bowel disorder! (NO!)

The metronidazole is for very severe diarrhoea. Usually try immodium first for minor. Then cipro, have resorted to that on occasion, not often, and it's virtually a miracle drug. But have been advised that should the cipro not be working to take metronizadole. To my recollection, this has only been the case once on a trip to India and in fact I ended up in hospital on that occasion as my body simply wasn't responding to any drugs taken orally and they gave me the medication via drip, which sorted me out within 24 hours. Delhi Belly and a half!

The motilium is for vomiting, I've never taken it though. It's a trade name for domperidone and in the kit just in case of severe vomiting.

The point of such a kit is not that one is likely to use most of the contents on any trip, in fact, we often use very little. But on many trips we have needed one or other item, including the stronger stuff such as cipro, and it's been a godsend. Even lesser items such as throat lozenges have been very welcome when suffering a very irritated and sore throat out in middle of nowhere.
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