packing for Tanzania

Old Apr 27th, 2007, 05:29 AM
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packing for Tanzania

I'm leaving for Kenya/Tz in 3 weeks. I've been reading all the lists of what to bring with me. But, a few more questions - I know it is suggested to wear long sleeves at night. Is a long sleeve T-shirt better than an open collar shirt? What about socks? Will my clothes get really dusty during the drives? How do I pack my binoculars? Or always carry with me? Is it too cold to use the hotel pool?

Any suggestions from recent visitors? I'm trying to pack as lightly as possible, but it's tough when you are a single traveler. Thank you
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 08:22 AM
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These are the questions I can answer.

Is a long sleeve T-shirt better than an open collar shirt?
I bring one long sleeved T-shirt and sometimes wear it over a collared short-sleeved shirt. That way it is one more layer I can add or remove. The long-sleeved T is a good garment for back at camp.

What about socks?
I brought about 4 pairs of hiking type socks even when I was not hiking and had the dirty ones laundered, allowing an extra day for them to dry because they were thick.

Will my clothes get really dusty during the drives?
Less dusty in a closed vehicle. My trousers never got too bad. With daily laundry service, no problem.

How do I pack my binoculars?
Either in your carryon or they become an accessory to keep the weight down, even if binocs as a necklace looks funny.

Or always carry with me?
Yes, keep binocs with you in carryon or on person.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 08:31 AM
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I was thinking of silk socks, the kind that you can wear under heavy ski socks. They are warmish but lightweight and dry fast.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 10:01 AM
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Those socks should be fine.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 10:29 AM
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I agree with atravelynn about the clothes. The dusty part is another story. It really depends on where you are going and what type safari.

We were extremely dusty! Worth it all though. As for the hotel pool...depends on where your hotel is. If you are staying at a lodge on the rim of the crater it might be a bit cool at night. Parts of Tanzania are actually on the equator and we had 110 degree days. Have a great time!

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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 12:35 PM
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"parts of Tanzania are actually on the equator"

Duh! When did they move the actual Equator? Last I checked it was in Kenya, running right through the Mt. Kenya Safari Club, about 2.5/hrs north of Nairobi.

Few hotel pools are heated, so the water is often cold and should be toe-tested, especially if traveling during the East African "winter" months (July - Sept). End of May into June, when you are traveling, is what would be considered Fall in the northern hemisphere, with mild days and cool nights/mornings. But the pool may still be cold.

Other advise is wise, but why would it be any more difficult for a single traveler that if two or more. You still have your own bag. Believe me, it's easy enough to keep within weight limits; being able to have laundry done at little or no cost, makes it even easier. You really don't need more changes of clothing for the amount of time you are at any one park/reserve the longest. So, if 4/days, say in the Masai Mara, then 4/days worth of clothing. Keep to similar colors with items that are interchangeable and you should be fine.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 01:32 PM
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Bear in mind that the advice for a long-sleeve shirt in the evenings is because mosquitos are most active at dusk, and you'll want the extra protection for your arms. The collar should help protect your neck, as well, unless you have a scarf or something. A collar is also good for sun protection, which you may or may not need depending on your vehicle (pop-up roof vs. the other type).

Sandi - If couples are anything like my parents, it's easier to pack with a couple because when my mom goes over the limit, she just puts extra in my dad's luggage.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 03:10 PM
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The reason why it is sometimes harder for 1 to pack than 2 is that I have to bring the toothpaste, bandaids, aspirin, sunscreen, etc. No one to split the load.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 03:22 PM
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It appears LilyLace is a time traveler, who has given herself away. Africa is moving slowly northeast and in the distant future (Lily's time) Tanzania will be on the equator. By the way Lily do you happen to know who won the 2007 World Series, I need some money for my next Africa trip.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 03:43 PM
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Whether traveling with a friend (male or female), I would never think to "share the load" and never trust anyone with "too much" of something (weight). My "stuff" is constantly ready to go on a moments notice... just pick it up and into the bag it goes. Then my clothing and I still manage to come in underweight.

Guess that's somewhat cheating, as I've done it so often, it doesn't take much thought.

But when I think about it, even to other destinations, always pack my own and take my own - I'm a big girl now!
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 04:10 PM
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I would never share my travel load with a companion. But when traveling with my husband we can more easily economize on space and weight. We don't take personal toothpastes. If a spare of something is needed, I just take one, not two. We share the contents of the medicine kit and the nail clippers. I can take half as much reading material because we swap. Only one map is needed and often only one set of other travel docs (plus the backup) is required. This paperwork can really add volume and weight so sharing it helps. It's even nice to split that wad of ones with another person. With all those advantages of togetherness, I should try to get him to accompany me more often.
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Old Apr 27th, 2007, 05:18 PM
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See that is why I post on this site with hesitation. There was no need to be so rude in response to Lily's posting.
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Old Apr 28th, 2007, 04:34 AM
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lynn -

There's a "he"? I don't recall reading this before (then, you may have never mentioned).
...and "he" doesn't accompany you? Ever?
Doesn't like travel? the destinations you choose?

I hear of so many women travelling on their own as their significent other or husband doesn't wish to, for whatever reason. And, your "he" why, my inquiring mind wonders?

Hey, only if you wish to share.

Maybe a survey of those with partners - male or female - who don't join in travel. Specific destinations only, don't like long flights, weather, health issues, prefer own space when the other is away, do their own travel at other times... and on and on. I've always wondered when I hear this. The reasons why!

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Old Apr 28th, 2007, 09:23 AM
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I'll be happy to try to satisfy your inquiring mind.

There's been the same "he" for 20+ years. His feeling is that he has had enough adventure in his life and is quite content at home but he is interested in the places I go, photos I take etc.

I did some traveling before we were married, but my ability to afford trips was much less then, so less travel. The Africa travel started about 8 years into our marriage when my earnings permitted it. Fortunately he has adapted well to this interest.

Someday he will accompany me to Africa, maybe on a brief swing down from a vacation in Europe. But hours of endless wildlife viewing is not his thing. We've seen bears in Minnesota and Alaska and he thought they were great and really liked looking at them. For about 15 minutes. That was enough. He enjoys the deer, occasional coyote, raccoons, etc. that pass by our window at home.

For someone who is luke warm about Africa and similar destinations, it does not make sense financially for him to go.

He likes history and trips such as those locating battle sites of the Black Hawk Indian wars. We've been to Metropolis, Illinois a few times which boasts the Superman Museum and the grave of the Birdman of Alcatraz and he even has his own signature brick below the Superman statue near the courthouse. It is not far from Tom Brokaw's.

I've met several other married women who travel without their husbands. I don't recall meeting any married men who traveled without their wives.

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Old Apr 28th, 2007, 02:01 PM
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Thanks Lynn -

Guess your "he" can join so many others I know who don't travel, at least not exotically. Hear similar stories from other women, so they go it alone. One gal travels so often I barely have time to read one trip report, that she's gone and returned from somewhere else.

And, no I've yet to hear of a married (or partnered) man traveling on their own... though a few might get away with "the guys" but, these are usually no more than a long week-end.

Wait - there is one couple I know who take separate vacations. Sometimes during the same time period - he in one direction, she to another; other times when it's best for either to travel.
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Old Apr 29th, 2007, 08:03 AM
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I rarely even meet single men who travel alone. Most men I encounter on trips are part of an established couple. But it is common for me to encounter a man alone doing a particular activity while his signficant other is back at the hotel or camp. So they'll split up for specific excursions while on a trip together.

Women seem to enjoy traveling with their spouse or partner, going solo, teaming up in groups of 4-6, booking with a tour, or joining a couple as a third. We don't seem to be particular, as long as we can get there.
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Old Apr 29th, 2007, 08:15 AM
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It's an old line, but my partner is fond of saying that his idea of camping is staying at a Holiday Inn. Not only does he actively not want to go to Africa, I actively do not want him to go with me because I want to be around people (preferably very few people) who really, really want to be there!

I did have a single fellow on one trip -- celebrating his 39th birthday (another statistical oddity) as well as a recent divorce -- and it was an interesting dynamic.
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Old Apr 29th, 2007, 09:03 AM
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My husband is now traveling alone occassionally, but just to dive, and he usually meets other men/women his age with his passion for sea life while there. I have no interest in diving or the destinations(Bonaire, Cozumel, etc) and we still have a son at home, so he goes alone. I have no problems with traveling alone either, in fact, it's been quite a different experience from always being a couple. Guess that makes him one of the few?
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Old Apr 30th, 2007, 04:39 AM
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Excuse me Sandi, for my horrible mistake. I should have said Kenya. My point is still the same - it will be hot and steady weather.

Your comments were very rude. My goodness, if you get this upset over such an oversight I certainly hope you never travel in my circles.
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Old Apr 30th, 2007, 06:37 AM
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Lily -

Far from upset, just wanted to correct the error and didn't want someone to go looking for the actual equator in Tanzania.

When traveling during Dec - Mar, in the northern areas of Kenya, the temps are very high, and can reach into the 100s. Likewise, you will find this in Tanzania. Only when visiting areas that are at higher altitudes, will you find the temps during this period somewhat more comfortable, but not by much; evenings and mornings are still cooler than daytime temps.

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