Olakira Camp, Serengeti

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Sep 27th, 2005, 06:08 PM
  #21
bat
 
Join Date: May 2004
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Leely:

No worries mate (what is the female equivalent?)

Game drives are ABSOLUTELY included. With our own Nomad guide and vehicle.

For reassurance, look at your detailed ATR spreadsheet and you will see it in there. For more reassurance, remember that climbhighsleeplow has already indicated that Nomad is topnotch.

For further reassurance, take a deep breath, open a bottle of wine and pour a really big glass, then read or re-read the Amex article about a Nomad trip.

http://www.departures.com/tr/tr_0505_serengeti.html

I was merely questioning paying park fees--not whether my game drives were included.
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Sep 27th, 2005, 06:20 PM
  #22
 
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bat,
Oh, wine is uncorked. I have to have something to worry about while I wait for amfs (sp?) to return from his/her trip and give a full report.

Of course, I should be using this time to learn more Swahili than "Habara za asubuhi?"
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Sep 27th, 2005, 06:25 PM
  #23
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Yes, please don't worry! Nomad's one of the best and your park fees are included in the overall quote by your outfitter, I am 100% sure!

What I meant was - if you get standalone quotes from these kind of camps, park fees are excluded by default (Game package or Full board - it doesn't matter). Since you are using an outfitter, the park fees will be taken care of!

As Bat stated, you have no worries! The Nomad portion of your safari will be a highlight!
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Sep 27th, 2005, 06:27 PM
  #24
bat
 
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I am drinking as I write also--and appreciate your worrying because it makes me feel better when I do--comadres in worrying.

As for swahili, I actually started to audit a course (it was free for me); started out fine, lasted 2 or so weeks and then let work get in the way. Of course, if I had diverted some of the time I spend reading this forum to my work I could have done both! So my plan is to take the teacher out to lunch and ask for some extra-curricular help.
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Sep 27th, 2005, 07:37 PM
  #25
 
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bat,
Park fees are almost always included in tour operator quotes unless otherwise specified. I have a few instances on my itinerary where they're excluded, but only because I wanted to keep our options flexible. There are two days on our schedule where we have a choice of parks/reserves to visit, and another day where we have the option to visit a park on the way to/from one of our other destinations. In those cases, I didn't want to prepay for parks that I may or may not decide to visit.
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Sep 27th, 2005, 07:48 PM
  #26
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Thanks Patty
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Sep 28th, 2005, 06:20 AM
  #27
 
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These seasonal camps sound very interesting. Does anyone know if there is a more ďrusticĒ reasonably priced variety?
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Sep 28th, 2005, 08:04 AM
  #28
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HI Nyamera

Yes indeed! All outfitters do camping safaris. But all are not equal! "You get what you pay for" is very applicable here.

Camping tents vary from igloo style tents (fine for Kilimanjaro but not for safari), to standup Bow tents to Hemingway-style tents of all shapes and sizes.

Some companies are importing tents from well-known international brands and the dark-green military-style colors of the past are thankfully being replaced with khaki colors or similar.

Camping sites are either public or special. Special camp sites are exclusive use but your outfitter has to be well-prepared as there is a strict pack-in/pack-out policy. And you don't want to find yourself in a special camp in the middle of nowhere with a crew that cannot be trusted.

Kibo Safaris has a long history of excellence in this area and they offer cheaper versions than their EMC camps. I would start with them and then compare others accordingly.

Beware of "cheapest" quotes. You will need a crew (chefs, etc) that's well-paid and experienced and you need good equipment as well as peace of mind that your team will protect you and the environment.
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Sep 28th, 2005, 08:47 AM
  #29
 
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Thanks Climhighsleeplow,

I was thinking about semi-permanent camps. I had a look at some mentioned in this thread and saw that they had en-suite facilities. I have this problem (not being a natural beauty), so I would like my own shower and mirror, but the prices seem a bit high. I can do without exquisite food and a comfortable bed. What Iím looking for is a smaller camp without permanent structures for less than $ 150 pppn (no single supplement and including everything except tips, drinks, and laundry), but Iím always looking for things that donít exist.
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Sep 28th, 2005, 09:30 AM
  #30
 
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Nyamera,
Here's a semi-permanent Serengeti camp that looks a bit more rustic to me -

http://www.flycat.com/e/camp_e.html

However, rustic doesn't always translate into lower prices I couldn't locate rates for this camp on their website but perhaps you could contact them. The German version of their site actually has far more information, but unfortunately my German is about on par with my Swahili
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Sep 28th, 2005, 10:33 AM
  #31
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Nyamera

Let's forget about this semi-permanent vs. permanent vs mobile thing and just talk about your needs.

If you are OK with basic, safe comfort then simply arrange a private camping safari and ask for a private shower and toilet! You will most probably get a Bow-type tent with a mattress and your shower/toilet will be next to your tent. You will get a guide and cook and off you go! I did something similar in June - though with friends and my own Landcruiser but it can be done.

$150 is a bit low unless you are on a group tour. For a bit more I think you can have a decent basic safari using public camp sites.

There are permanent camps around the perimeter of the Serengeti (Ikoma and Serengeti stop over) that also fall in your budget.

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Sep 28th, 2005, 10:56 AM
  #32
 
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Patty,

Thanks. That camp looks like what Iím looking for.

Iíd decided not to ask these sorts of questions before being able to plan a safari with at least an approximate departure date Ö I know no German and canít find anything that looks like rates. Iíll probably contact them with an email in Swahili. I know how to haggle in written Swahili Ė not spoken Ė but to do that I have to know when Iíll be able to travel.

Climbhighsleeplow,

Iíve been looking at Ikoma. I think itíll be less expensive than solo travel with a guide and a cook. Iíll ask more about this when I know when/if iíll be able to go to Tanzania.
Thanks


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