Last minute question--power strip voltage

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Jan 31st, 2006, 08:46 AM
  #1
bat
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Last minute question--power strip voltage

I want to take a multi outlet power strip per Sarvowinner's recent reccommendation. I am getting conflicting advice from local stores. Can a U.S. power strip handle the voltage or do I need to find a power strip that specifically handles 220?
Thanks
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Jan 31st, 2006, 09:16 AM
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Bat,

My sister who has lived in the US says the power strip can handle the voltage – you just have to make sure the appliances you plug in the power strip can handle it.

Safari njema, Popo.



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Jan 31st, 2006, 10:04 AM
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U.S. powerstrip definitely CANNOT handle 220v.

It's also very dangerous to try.

From past experience, we blew out hotel fuses and totally fried our powerstrip when we tried. Spark. Fire. Smoke. You get the picture.

You'll need a converter and I believe the powerstrip can be used with that.
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Jan 31st, 2006, 11:21 AM
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Oops. Never trust me – and definitely not my sister. I hope her house hasn’t burned down.
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Jan 31st, 2006, 11:36 AM
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Is Bat on her way to Tanzania without having read Okow68’s post?
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Jan 31st, 2006, 11:44 AM
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okow68 is correct. I accidently plugged in a US powerstrip without using the converter and 'pfft' it was fried.
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Jan 31st, 2006, 12:36 PM
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bat
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still here. I was off running other last minute errands--I have had only 9 months to pack Thanks for the info.
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Jan 31st, 2006, 02:23 PM
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sandi
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I was so thrilled to see a real outlet in a bathroom (in Turkey somewhere), other then the one they provide for shavers, that I connected a curling iron without a converter. Within 2-minutes this foul smell!

I looked at the counter and there was this puddle of melted plastic and metal.

I'll never do that again!

 
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Jan 31st, 2006, 06:10 PM
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I purchased from Europlus.com --
http://www.europlugs.com/catalog.Roc...ucts-WE-4A.htm

The WE-4A series strips are perfect as they have universal recepticles. You can then purchase whichever power cord(s) you want. I have a South African cord for use on safaris.

James
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Jan 31st, 2006, 07:35 PM
  #10
bat
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So a futile last minute effort to find a 220 power strip. I learned where I MIGHT have found one if I had not come up with the idea at the last moment. James' info seems great.
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Feb 1st, 2006, 07:27 AM
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I asked my brother who has a PhD in electrical engineering what the reply to Bat’s question should have been and his answer is:

“Of course you can use the power strip the issue is the equipment that you
>connect to the power strip. If the equipment connected to the power strip
>is marked "only for 110V" you should not use it but in mostly case it is the
>same equipment as for 220V but with different rating so you can use it
>anyway (Not to recommend if you don't know what you are doing). If the
>connected equipment is marked 110/220 V or if it has a switch for
>selecting the voltage level it is ok to use it.
>
>In this case it is the current that is the dangerous part, e.g. if a 110V
>/7 A simple device with no protection is used with a 10 A fuse it is ok,
>if the same device is used with 220V the current will be 14 A and the fuse
>will blow. If the device have some protection electronics or is rated for
>both 110 V and 220V the current when the device is connected to 220V will
>be only 3.5A and everything is ok.
>The danger with the voltage is when a high voltage can make a jump in air
>between two different potentials, normally it requires about 5000V/1cm, a
>bit dependent of moist, temperature and so on. In this case 110V more or
>less really doesn't matter if their is no electronic components witch can
>be destroyed, but in that case they are fed by DC and a transformer with
>protection is used between the electronics and the grid.”
>


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Feb 1st, 2006, 08:58 AM
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Hi James -
I just ordered one of the power strips from the link you recommended. Am curious about what countries you used this in, as there were 2 options for the actual power cord patr of it for Tanzania - and I just orded both since I leave this weekend. Would rather leave one at home if possible...thx!
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Feb 1st, 2006, 09:36 AM
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Hi Kim,

I spend a great deal of time in RSA and Bots mainly. I haven't used it in East Africa. Maybe give them a call?

Sorry I couldn't help further.

James
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