From Drought to Floods in Kenya

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Apr 10th, 2006, 05:43 PM
  #1
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From Drought to Floods in Kenya

The following is link to BBC report re flooding in Kenya from massive rainfall. Hopefully, this will end the drought (We are going to Samburu in August):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/world/n...2006news.shtml

Kevin from California
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Apr 10th, 2006, 08:05 PM
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Kevin, thank you for spotting this for us. However, I hope this is good news and not the opposite. There are 3000 homeless in Isiolo (Samburu) and while that is itself not that worrying, providing it is an area that is prone to flood from time to time (people and animals alike will have some kind of contingency plans, as they do here in Thailand) if it carries on beyond "normal" there are a whole new set of consequences to face.


Kevin, this isn't a "smartass" snipe aimed at you; I know what you mean and of course I feel the same way...I'll be there in December.... this is aimed at us all ..... isn't it a bit "off" to express concern about inconvenience to one's holiday in perspective to natural disaster... hard to avoid but when do we cross the line to comments along the lines of e.g. "Luckily those damn ..(insert as appropriate depending on where you come from)... terrorist attacks happened after I had left .... (Bali/New York/London,etc.).... and so my vacation was thankfully not completely ruined"......?
Mmmmmmmm... :-?

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Apr 11th, 2006, 07:19 AM
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Last Friday in a suburban mall, I met a man from Archerís Post, who before moving to Sweden had been living in the last house before Samburu NR. He said that it had started to rain, but didnít say anything about floods. I said something about that it was good that it had started to rain, but as he also told me that ALL cows were gone, maybe I should have said something else. Peopleís lives are ruined and cows donít spring up from the ground just because thereís rain. From a touristís point of view this is probably good. Tourists donít like to see cattle and some appalling injustices have been committed in East Africa because of this.


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Apr 11th, 2006, 09:38 AM
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Nyamera.... thank you for that. You really need to develop a less "informed" point of view - or at least to add more weight to the positive, but I really appreciate the perspective in this case. I am not sure that Kevin's post deserves it, but it is certainly information that I find hard to dispute

(for the sake of transparency I have had much too much to drink on the eve of a very long public holiday here and reserve the right to come back later and qualify nd/or absolutely deny what I said) ;-)

First post was sober...
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Apr 11th, 2006, 10:18 AM
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Kimburu,
Some goats are still alive
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Apr 11th, 2006, 10:29 AM
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Kevin,
Thanks for the link. It reminded me of the encounter at the mall. Not that I needed to be reminded Ė Iím returning on Thursday even though Iím hardly selling anything at all at that place.

This man, Abdi, wasnít the first Kenyan Iíve encountered there, but he was the first one Iíve spoken to in Swahili. He told me about the cows in Swahili, so hopefully Iíve misunderstood him. Though ďngíombe wamekwishaĒ is hard to misunderstand. Some herders had taken their cows to the slopes of Mount Kenya, but there the cold killed them.
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Apr 11th, 2006, 12:10 PM
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Having just read the first chapter of George Monbiot's "No Man's Land" the drought, the floods and the loss of the cattle are very meaningful to me.

It is a tragedy of the greatest moment. It is the destruction of an entire way of life.

I will be visiting Kenya and Tanzania in August. My original goal was, of course, viewing the wild life in it's natural habitat. My readings to date have changed that to a great extent...
 
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Apr 11th, 2006, 12:32 PM
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Africnow,
I recently discovered George Monbiot and I too am reading No Manís Land at the moment. It was written in 1994 and I would like to have an update, though it seems like not that much has changed.
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Apr 12th, 2006, 01:45 AM
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I'm sorry to hear that. The more I read the more I realize that Tanzania has not escaped the problems found around the world in this regard e.g. Australia, USA, India and so on...

I wonder if there has been no follow-up because of personal reasons. In Chapter 3, 'God's Land' he mentions the difficulties and legal problems that he runs into with these kinds of investigations - p 53-54 in my edition (Green Books, 2005)
 
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Apr 12th, 2006, 07:22 AM
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Africnow,
Same pages in my book.
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