Film for safari

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May 17th, 2002, 04:46 AM
  #1
Judy
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Film for safari

We are bringing two cameras with to photograph wildlife. Kodak Easy Share DX4900 digital and also older model Minolta camera with 200mm lens. Do you think we should invest in a new point and shoot with zoom lens instead of the Minolta? We are not very good photographs but especially want these pictures to turn out well. What brand of film have you had good luck with? Kodak or FIJI? Is 800 speed film recommended over 400? Any other suggestions would also be appreciated. Thanks!
 
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May 17th, 2002, 05:03 AM
  #2
Patricia
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We just came back from safari and a couple from our trip took a point and shoot and said they got great pictures. I don't know what speed film they used. It does get kind of dim sometimes later in the day. I took 400 Fuji film and most of my pictures came out great. I only used the telephoto lens a few times (up to 135--not a very powerful one). I have an older model manual Pentax. It was kind of a pain in the neck sometimes, but I could see a big difference in my pictures and some of those taken by my friend who went with me and used a point and shoot. Mine were brighter. The problem with 800 is that it may be affected going through security if you don't hand carry it. I put my 400 film through in my carry-on luggage and it came through just fine. It went through 3 or 4 airports before it was used. I doubt anyone in our group used greater than 400. Maybe Thyra (of our group) will answer this question herself, as she gets on these threads often. Hope this helps. Also, I didn't need a bean bag to steady my camera, as many recommend. I took one but never took it out of my bag and didn't miss it.
 
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May 17th, 2002, 06:08 AM
  #3
kavey
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Judy
I took all Fuji, which I prefer to Kodak for better colours.
But I took 100, 200 and 400 speeds, having heard about how intense the light would be, even in winter.
Unfortunately I found that early morning and late afternoon game drives meant many pictures taken in reduced light. It was hard to have the right film in at the right time, since I didn't take as many films as many others so one film sometimes lasted through from midday to the same evening.
In retrospect I will next time take 400 speed all through.
Print quality for my purposes is fine, including reasonable size blow ups, and I am not going to get the pictures published, so I don't need 100 speed film fine grain.
And anyway, these days 400 speed films have such small grain as to be like 100 speed films 15 years ago.
Kavey

So in summary, Fuji Superia 400 is my favourite.

For camera, it's hard to recommend, I took my Minolta SLR and could not have got my shots with a point and shoot, since I made use of changed aperture etc. But if SLR photography isn't your thing, consider a point and shoot, or you might lose the shot for the time you spent messing around with the camera settings.
 
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May 17th, 2002, 06:21 AM
  #4
Patricia
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One thing I meant to add that Kavey mentioned--several times I did miss a shot messing with aperture change and focusing. Although one, the only leopard we saw (who was up in a tree), the shot my friend got with her point and shoot was so dark you couldn't tell there was anything in the tree, unless you knew. I missed it altogether, because he jumped down and took off through the grass. But, in a way, she missed it too because you couldn't see him. Don't know what Thyra got as I haven't seen her pictures. It's kind of a trade off, I guess. And depends on the camera. Whatever you're most comfortable with.
 
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May 18th, 2002, 06:36 AM
  #5
Kavey
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Patricia
All the more reason to go back soon and have another go at getting that shot!

Kavey
 
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May 18th, 2002, 04:04 PM
  #6
Nancy
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I used a Canon Rebel 2000 (which I bought specifically for my safari) with a 200mm lens and it was great. I did not have to fiddle with camera settings. Some others had up to a 400mm lenses but, honestly, there wasn't much difference. You need at least the 200mm lens to get good shots. You can spend a whole roll just on a group of lions looking for the best shot. And, you want closeups. I like Fuji film as I think the color develops brighten but it may be my imagination. My film varied between 200 and 400 and I still can't see the difference.
 
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Jun 1st, 2002, 07:35 PM
  #7
little tourist
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For film there are differences between Kodak and Fuji. Basically, Fuji film is created with a blue and green base. Kodak has a red and gold. If you get confused, their colors correspond to their marketing colors. Anyway, for places like the Pacific Northwest in the U.S. Green trees and blue skies and blue water go fuji.
For the dessert, red and yellow sand, go Kodak.
At this point, technology is so wonderful, the difference between 400 ISO and 100 ISO isn't very noticable to us amateurs. I'd only take 400 as it's the most versatile.
As for Cameras, unless you have a specific weight limit that you're worried about, take them all! We're headed to Africa next year and I'll be taking my Canon EOS but I'll also take my Olympus point and shoot. You want a camera that you're comfortable with, so you don't waste time trying to adjust, if you're not super fast.
 
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Jun 2nd, 2002, 01:00 PM
  #8
DiDi
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I took a Minolta Maxxum 5 camera with a 28-200 lens and wish I had bought the 28-300 instead. I was very fortunate that our guide used a Minolta and had 75-400 lens which fit my camera. Although I didn't use it all the time, I did find it very convenient.

I took both 100 & 200 speed Kodak and was forced to buy some Fuji Superia film. I must admit that the Fuji colors were definitely preferable to those of the Kodak. The 100 & 200 speed worked pretty well but for my next trip I would go for the 400 speed film.

Enjoy your trip and take lots and lots of film with you if you are going on Safari. It's tough to find when you are "in the bush". Also, make sure you take extra batteries for your camera.

 
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Jun 3rd, 2002, 09:51 AM
  #9
chris
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On my safari last year in Kenya and SA I used exclusively Kodak Supra 400 and 800, with a Canon EOS Elan and Tamron 28-200. I was very pleased with the results. The 400 was the most usefull but some shooting was during low light so the 800 was used. Supra is a professional quality film but for the litle extra cost is definetly worth it for these important occasions.
One comment is that often you are so close to the animals that a 200 lens may be too much, I suppose you could use your digital then but I would personally either get a good point and shoot zoom as you mention or another Minolta lens, say 28-200.
Have fun & Bon Voyage
 
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