Best Rooms at Kwando Camps?

Sep 27th, 2006, 10:15 AM
  #21  
santharamhari
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gaurang,

Yes i did watch it on HDTV. The specs, i hv to chk with her. I will let her know about the external microphone. Right now, on certain days, the wind noise seemed pretty obvious and was pretty annoying, especially since i couldnt get what the guide was saying on the commentary.

You will like Little Kwara also. Make sure you do the boat trip to the heronery. Must do....

Hari
 
Sep 27th, 2006, 10:31 AM
  #22  
santharamhari
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gaurang,

Hope you have great luck with the new infra red equipment....During my recent trip, our night drives got extended only twice in total. One at Lebala where we found a leopard and tried to follow her. Once we lost her, we came across a relaxed serval....then came across genet prior to heading home.

The next came at Kwara, where the lions had just brought down buffalo....we were there for quite a bit.....

Besides these instances, in most other cases there wasnt much around and at night tracking is difficult also.....so i was happy to head back to camp.

Hari
 
Sep 27th, 2006, 11:49 PM
  #23  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 342
Thanks Hari. I've been told to expect temperatures of 20 degrees C at night, while I'm there.

I don't plan to do the overnight drives any more, but I do plan to have some late nights.

Do Kwando and Wilderness camps use UK style 3-pin electrical sockets?
Africa is offline  
Sep 28th, 2006, 12:42 AM
  #24  
santharamhari
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I can't remember the WS charging systems, i was last there in 2004. I would expect them to have the ability....

Yes, Kwando has the adaptability for all universal systems. I did specifically check this, during my stay in August....as my Sister had to charge the video camera literally every day.

Later nights should be easily possible...also, if you arent interested in sundowner stops in the evenings, you dont have to waste time doing this just inform your guide. However, if you see something good....the usual norm is for the sundowner stop after the best evening light has passed.....

You wont be cold in November, however a light sweatshirt of something could be handy. Definitely take something for the rain. Although, they do hv ponchos in the car. They also carry the large plastic garbage bags to help protect your camera and gear from the rains.

Hari
 
Sep 28th, 2006, 05:26 AM
  #25  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 342
Thanks Hari.
Africa is offline  
Sep 28th, 2006, 07:11 AM
  #26  
santharamhari
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Anytime, Gaurang....i'm very excieted for you...
 
Sep 28th, 2006, 02:33 PM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,501
Hi Gaurang,

The type of socket at WS camps depends on which camp you are in. Assuming you have in-room sockets (not all camsp to) they will usually be the three-round-pin South African type so you'll need an adaptor.

If you need to charge stuff in the bar (as you will at Savuti) the sockets will almost definitely be the three-round-pin SA ones.

You may want to bring at least one UK-SA adaptor if you have a lot of gear as I've found that there tend to be a lot of US-SA adaptors around but not as many UK-SA ones.

Cheers,
Julian
jasher is offline  
Sep 28th, 2006, 03:06 PM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,766
Africa

At Duma Tau we got to within about six feet of a Black Mamba that was dying from presumably an Eagle attack. As we were watching and taking pictures it moved into the channel and swam about halfway across before rearing out of the water in presumably a death throw, the disappearing forever.
napamatt is offline  
Sep 28th, 2006, 10:21 PM
  #29  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 342
Julian....thanks for the information. That is a great help and very useful, as I wasn't really planning on taking an UK-SA adapter.

Matt....a very lucky (but sad) sighting. A very dignified ending for a wonderful animal. How long was the snake?
Africa is offline  
Sep 28th, 2006, 10:25 PM
  #30  
santharamhari
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gaurang,

Why is the black Mamba your favourite? just curious....also, have you ever seen one? At LK this trip, i saw a Mozambique spitting cobra. U seen one?

Hari
 
Sep 28th, 2006, 11:43 PM
  #31  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 342
Hi Hari

I've been interested in snakes for a long time. When my mother was young, she used to keep a wild cobra in India - it was not enclosed and was allowed to freely roam in the attic. It even used to drink milk from a bowl!! My mum is quite religious and a strong believer of Shiv - thus her admiration for cobras.

From my science research, I became fascinated by their venom which has amazing properties. Today snake venom is being researched for potential cures/treatments to many human diseases - with the potential to develop new drugs.

For me, the ultimate snake is the Black Mamba - purely for a combination of speed, size, strike rate, venom toxicity and respect. It is also the most feared snake in Afica - but a lot of the old stories have been made up and passed down from generation to generation. I have only ever seen the back end of one. On foot, I have approached a puff adder and python - both to within 2 meters (puff adders are very slow but have a fast strike - so you have to stay out of their strike range). I would never approach a black mamba on foot!!!

I haven't seen a cobra in Africa yet, but would like to.
Africa is offline  
Sep 29th, 2006, 12:52 AM
  #32  
santharamhari
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thanks Gaurang, very informative. I guess i have a lot to learn about snakes and release my fear of them.

Hari
 
Sep 30th, 2006, 03:25 PM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,501
Hi Gaurang,

My last trip was a big trip for snakes -- a black mamba at Mombo, a puff adder at Kwando, and a twig snake at Londoz. Every encounter was closer than the last...

Cheers,
Julian
jasher is offline  
Sep 30th, 2006, 05:10 PM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,766
Africa

2.5 meters easily.

Jim Weis got some cool pictures.
napamatt is offline  
Oct 1st, 2006, 07:11 AM
  #35  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 342
Julian.....we are still waiting for the photos I hope got some good pictures.

Matt....that would be a dream sighting for me!!
Africa is offline  
Oct 1st, 2006, 03:16 PM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,274
Gaurang,

I've been fairly lucky on safari and have seen and been able to photograph a few snakes...a puff adder close-up just outside Chizarira NP in Zimbabwe, an Egyptian cobra at a distance and a Kalahari sand snake really close in Botswana (plus a very big python high in a tree, but no photograph). I had the sand snake ID'd but I'm still not 100% certain of the species...as you're a snake enthusiast, maybe you can help:
www.afrigalah.com/sel3img/Sandsnake.jpg

John
afrigalah is offline  
Oct 1st, 2006, 10:16 PM
  #37  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 342
Hi John

I'm definately not a snake expert but I do have an interest in the more venomous species.

From the shape of the head and the size, position and features of the eye - it definately looks like an African sand snake. But the colour does look unusal for an African sand snake and not one that I've seen before? I think there are 23 different sand snakes in Africa.

Gaurang
Africa is offline  
Oct 1st, 2006, 11:12 PM
  #38  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,274
Gaurang,

I sent this photo back to LE a couple of years ago, and got the reply, 'Kalahari sand snake'...but as you're probably aware, local common names can differ from those the taxonomists give some species. I've sent Botswana bird photos to internet birders' galleries with the local names I've known them by, only to have the galleries display them with different names.

This fellow was so tiny. I was on my stomach when I took the photo, with a 1:1 macro lens probably less than a foot from its head. The guide was asking me not to go closer, so I didn't. The shot is cropped.

John
afrigalah is offline  
Oct 1st, 2006, 11:48 PM
  #39  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 342
Hi John

Most Kalahari sand snakes are brown with white underbellies. This one seems olive with a yellow underbelly. You never know.....you might have discovered a new sub-species!!!

Try contacting a herpertologist who specialises in African snakes. It may be African sand snake number 24!!!

Gaurang
Africa is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2006, 12:27 AM
  #40  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,274
Gaurang,

I've just spent a little time re-scanning the slide to try to get a better image, and I've discovered the name LE gave me was 'yellow-bellied sand snake.' I think it was the guide who told me 'Kalahari sand snake' when he was explaining that it was harmless and it would be OK for me to get out of the vehicle

Nevertheless, I'll see if I can find an African herpetologist. Thanks.

John
afrigalah is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:55 PM.