Antarctica pics

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Mar 14th, 2006, 01:15 PM
  #21
 
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Ah, well it helps to shoot digital and have a fast computer to work with. It also helps to have friends and family that constantly badger you for the pictures.

Of course, the only processing I did was enough to get the pics on the web. Processing done for prints, on the other hand, takes quite a bit longer. I also don't have to be as picky for pics I share with family and friends - they want to see things like what my hotel room looked like, so the editing goes pretty quickly.

My goal is usually to get the pics out before they receive the postcards I sent them. Given that it took 3 months for the postcards from Ecuador to arrive here in SF, that's usually enough time.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 01:21 PM
  #22
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I do shoot digital and process on the PC. I shoot in RAW which I actually now find faster to work with than when I used to shoot JPEG. I don't bother processing any just for web - what I do is the full process on what I think are the strongest ones and once those are done I can batch process to create smaller-sized jpeg copies for web use.

I am excessively behind though...
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Mar 14th, 2006, 01:25 PM
  #23
 
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Great pics! Couldn't you get model releases from the Skua or Penguin?? ;-)
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Mar 14th, 2006, 01:28 PM
  #24
DJE
 
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lifelist,

You've got some fabulous shots from Peru and the Galapagos. Really enjoyed viewing them.

As well as seeing the Antarctic and a return trip to Patagonia, we would also like to do a trip to Machu Picchu and combine it with a visit to the Galapagos. How many days on ship would be recommended to see the various islands and do you know anything about the hotel that is right at the site of M. P.? A trip along the Inca Trail would be amazing I'm sure but not something that I am physically capable of doing, plus I'm not one for really roughing it.

Another destination spot we are interested in going to is the Atacama desert in Northern Chile which we could probably do with one of the above excursions. Have you visited this area at all?

This year it's a return trip to Africa which I am very much looking forward to.

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Mar 14th, 2006, 01:29 PM
  #25
 
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I used to follow the same process you described, but since I share my photos more through the web rather than through prints, it seemed better to do a quick edit and use some automated scripts to get things pushed to the website. It's pretty easy to go through Adobe Bridge, tag the ones I like, do a quick adjustment to the raw file, and then do a batch conversion to jpeg.

I'll go back later and choose the ones I think are worth printing, which is usually a signficantly smaller batch of photos. Of course, this means I'm going through my photos twice, so your method is more efficient. And, if you're shooting for stock, it makes a lot more sense.

The Galapagos trip was a photo-oriented trip, so there were a number of pro and semi-pro photographers onboard. A number of them would spend their nights going through the daily take on their laptops and doing a first pass edit. That's too much work for me - I'd rather sleep.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 01:39 PM
  #26
 
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DJE,

I spent 8 days in the Galapagos, and it seemed like just the right amount. This doesn't include travel time, and time spent in Guayaquil and Quito. I went with Lindblad Expeditions, and they are a top notch operator. Everything went smoothly and efficiently. It was a spur of the moment trip - my agent who arranged my Antarctica trip sent me e-mail mentioning that they had a $1000 discount for the November departure, so I jumped on it.

The Sanctuary Lodge looked like a very nice hotel and is right at the entrance gates to Machu Picchu. I didn't go inside - mainly because I was pretty grubby by the time the hike was done. However, I would suggest that at $500 a night, it might be a bit more than most would want to spend. The Pueblo Hotel in Aguas Caliente is very nice, and not far from the bus stop to get you up to the ruins. And, it's signficantly cheaper than the Sanctuary Lodge.

I'm afraid that my visits to Chile and Argentina were limited to the Patagonian Andes, so I haven't had a chance to get to the Atacama Desert.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 01:55 PM
  #27
DJE
 
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lifelist,

Thanks for your additional comments. I too have heard some good things about the Lindblad Expeditions. From what you said we should put aside a good week for the Galapagos.

Regarding Machu Picchu, the one advantage about staying right at the ruins would be to see a sunrise before the bulk of tourists arrive and a sunset after they've all left. Thanks again for the info.

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Mar 14th, 2006, 02:04 PM
  #28
 
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Great pictures! How funny I was just thinking that some good polar bear pictures would be great to see here. But the penguins were beautiful too.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 02:05 PM
  #29
 
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Ah, but the first bus from Aguas Caliente arrives at the gate at 6 a.m., so you won't quite be alone at sunrise. The trains arrive quite a bit later in the day, so the bulk of the daytrippers won't be around. I think the biggest advantage for the Sanctuary Hotel is that you can just roll out of bed and be in Machu Picchu, rather than having to get up really early and catch the first bus.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 02:37 PM
  #30
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I'd echo lifelist's comments on hotels for Machu Picchu.

The Pueblo hotel is where we stayed for this visit in 2005 and it's actually an enchanting hotel. I could have stayed for days actually. I just loved sitting in the gardens and watching the many, many hummingbirds. They have sugar water feeders hanging throughout the garden so you'll see lots of the little beauties. Rooms were comfortable and relaxing.

The hotel is down at the bottom of the hill and it takes about 20 mins to bus up it but it's possible to do that and still be at the entrance to MP for when it opens and to stay until it closes.

When I went to MP as a teen we stayed in the hotel right at the entrance - I can't recall if it was called the Sanctuary then or not. Certainly it was more basic then and cheaper too as not so many tourists were visiting - I think MP had only recently been reopened to tourists when we were there.

A definite advantage is the ease of slipping out of the ruins and back to the hotel for lunch/ toilet as it really is right there at the entrance.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 02:39 PM
  #31
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Lifelist, well the skills of those photographers certainly seemed to be with you too - I really really like your pics.

DJE we were only in the Galapagos Islands for about 4 days and I would certainly have preferred longer.

I'd certainly suggest as small a ship as possible and one that is generous with time on shore for the excursions.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 05:03 PM
  #32
DJE
 
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lifelist and Kavey,

Thanks for the additional info.
I think I would spend the extra $$ and stay right at the site, just for the sheer convenience of it. I agree it would be a definite advantage to be able to just hop back to the hotel when needed. Do the last buses leave the site well before sunset? The idea of relaxing on a balcony or somewhere with a view of M.P. at sunset is also very appealing.

What is the best time of year for a trip of this kind to both destinations keeping weather in mind? Naturally we'd prefer a drier time and I do have difficulties with motion so calmer waters would be helpful. Temps. don't really concern me much so if it's cool that's fine.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 08:26 PM
  #33
 
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The Galapagos is good any time. It's definitely warmer during the summer months which makes for more comfortable snorkeling.

Dry season for Machu PIcchu is mid-April to October. Hot, dry days and cold, dry nights. November to mid-April is the rainy season with most of the rain during January and February. In fact, the Inca Trail shuts down in February for maintenance and clean up.
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Mar 15th, 2006, 08:22 AM
  #34
 
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Kavey -- wonderful pictures. We just got back from our Antarctic and Argentina trip a week ago and your pictures are already bringing back memories of that incredible, unique place. Thank you!
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