Amazing photos of lions fighting

Nov 13th, 2007, 06:05 AM
  #1  
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Amazing photos of lions fighting

Came across these 19 photos of a young lion challenging an older dark maned one, leading to a brutal bloody fight ... here's the first one, then click 'next'. This is maybe too graphic for some.

If you are squeamish about blood you should stop before the final two images.

http://www.pbase.com/canux/image/73974198

Amazing animals.

Bill
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Nov 13th, 2007, 06:46 AM
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Wow.
Bill H,
Thanks, are those pics. done by bracketting (sp.)?
I'm just now learning to do this.
cybor is offline  
Nov 13th, 2007, 07:45 AM
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Cybor, They aren't Bill's own photos so I doubt he'd be able to answer that. But to find out more about the settings used you can click on the FULL EXIF link below each image.

Bracketing is about exposure - when you aren't sure whether you have the right exposure you ask your camera to bracket - that is to take one image at the exposure it's suggested, another one that is overexposed and one that is under. This way it's likely that one of the three will be properly exposed.

For fast-moving action that wouldn't be ideal because it does take the camera time to take three shots instead of one.

Looking at the timings of these images it looks as though the photographer switched on burst mode - that allows you to take several images in very quick succession by pressing and holding the shutter down rather than having to release and press again between each shot.

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Nov 13th, 2007, 07:48 AM
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are those pics. done by bracketing?

I didn't take them (darn it), they were shot by a couple from Canada on their honeymoon.

You can click on the phrase 'full exif' below the photo and it shows whatever tech data was recorded ... exposure bracketing refers to shooting the same scene at different exposures hoping to capture the right light, but this is something you'd typically do with a landscape photo in difficult light.

With fast moving action like these lions you can't really bracket for exposure and I'm sure they were just holding down the shutter trying to shoot as fast as the camera allowed to catch as much of the action as possible.

Probably cursing when the buffer filled up and they had to wait between shots if they are like Carol and me

Bill
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Nov 13th, 2007, 07:50 AM
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Kavey's post must have gone up while I was typing mine ... everything Kavey said is right-on ...
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Nov 13th, 2007, 07:54 AM
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Sorry, Bill, I know the Q was aimed at you. It's the IT Trainer in me kicking in!
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Nov 13th, 2007, 07:58 AM
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Incredible photos!

Typically I think male lions have a pretty good gig... except when they have to fight for their territory. I don't think that young one was quite ready to try to take on the big guy.
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Nov 13th, 2007, 07:59 AM
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Sorry, Bill, I know the Q was aimed at you.

No problem Kavey, you answered it faster and better than I did

Bill
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Nov 13th, 2007, 08:37 AM
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Aaw... probably because I'm procrastinating. I'm good at ignoring my task list in favour of a bit of surfing! (I'm self-employed, before anyone assumes I'm cheating my employees!)
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Nov 13th, 2007, 08:55 AM
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Wow...thanks for sharing your find, Bill. Those are pretty amazing photos.

Shane
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Nov 13th, 2007, 10:58 AM
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Thanks, the photos were clearly marked by the couple who were on their honeymoon (Jason and Priscilla) - couldn't miss it. Just figured that with Bill being our onsite photo expert he'd know the best way to sequence an active scene.

Sounds like my instructor is calling the burst mode "bracketting". It's a feature built into my camera that I'm trying to play with. It doesn't require one to hold the shutter down as Kavey suggested, as I have a built in setting for this.

We tried this technique in class with moving objects and people. I was thinking that this would be a good technique for active wildlife shots.
That is, of course, if I become as lucky as the lion fight photographer.

At any rate, back to digital class and thanks for the replys.
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Nov 13th, 2007, 11:16 AM
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Gee, I was eating my paltry lunch of yogurt at my desk and looking at these photos. Exciting as it was, well, my yogurt went in the trash

Thanks for the link!

-doo
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Nov 13th, 2007, 11:57 AM
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Just figured that with Bill being our onsite photo expert ...

Cybor, this is flattering (blush) but there are several people on this group better qualified for 'expert' status than me, people like Andy Biggs and Johan (Skimmer) immediately come to mind.

(burst mode) doesn't require one to hold the shutter down as Kavey suggested, as I have a built in setting for this.

What model do you have? With most dSLRs there's a setting for 'drive' (in Canon-speak, Nikon may use something else) and you set it up there. So for example on the body I just got I can set it to single frame or 3 frames/sec or 10 frames/sec but I have to hold the shutter down to get 3 or 10 fps to burst. But I can set up the bracketing to all fire off with one shutter press ... up to 7 frames with varying exposures.

The other thing to look out for when bursting is the buffer depth ... this is on-camera memory that lets you store the images quickly while bursting, but once it is full the camera has to write off to the compact flash card before you can take another shot.

For example on the camera we use most of the time the buffer was 20 deep and we could shoot 8 frames/sec, so in 2.5 sec you can fill the buffer, then it slows to about 1 frame/sec (the camera writes to the card at 8 MB/sec and the files are about 8 MB, so one buffer spot is freeing up each second). On my new camera it's 30 deep and 10 fps so after 3 sec and 30 shots I hit the speed bump.

I was thinking that this would be a good technique for active wildlife shots.

Yes, these cameras are used mainly by sports, news and wildlife photographers. On a typical trip to Alaska or Africa I find I only need this 2 or 3 times per trip, but when you need it it's nice to have. We got 40 photos (20 each from his and her cameras) of OUR lion fight in April 2006 in under 3 seconds, which is about as long as the fight lasted Really glad we had the fast bodies.

Bill
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Nov 13th, 2007, 01:11 PM
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Amazing sighting. The leaps are incredible. The youngster took a beating.

The last image in the series is magnificent.

Unfortunately many of the pics are slightly OOF (Out of Focus)

Geoff.
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Nov 13th, 2007, 01:31 PM
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WOW! what a sighting. As much as I would love to take pictures of these lions in such brutal fight, the truth is that watching it without a camera would be even better. I'd also find it hard to focus, you cant have it all. Where was this anyway?
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Nov 13th, 2007, 01:43 PM
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somewhere in Tanzania
matnikstym is offline  
Nov 13th, 2007, 02:06 PM
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Well who ever you are out there, all your pictures, not just they lions are very well captured moments, nice eye for photography
Alejandra is offline  
Nov 13th, 2007, 02:38 PM
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Hi Bill,

Amazing sequence of images. thanks for posting that link.

Here is another great lion sequence of a lioness makng a kill and then a male joining ....

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/587968/0

cybor - continous high speed shooting is commonly known as burst mode in photographic jargon.
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Nov 13th, 2007, 03:40 PM
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Unfortunately many of the pics are slightly OOF (Out of Focus)

The EXIF data indicates 1/80th sec at 400 mm ... ideally you'd want at least 1/1,000th sec with a lens that long and that fast action so I think there's some motion blur because of the slow shutter speed. Probably could have jacked the ISO up one stop (from 200 to 400) but still hard to get a fast enough shutter speed in that light, I guess.

Bill

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Nov 13th, 2007, 06:42 PM
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Bill_H and Mohammed

Thanks for sharing the great photos.

Percy
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